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What to bring to the Field- Tips and Tricks

dangerboy

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One word of advice when packing your kit is not to pack your rucksack completely.  What will happen when you deploy is your friendly 2IC will give you additional items to carry that you probably won't think of : ammunition for the support weapons, extra batteries for the radios and observation devices, food and water. In fact you don't have a lot of space to put your own personal items, unfortunately we don't train like this very often and remember when we are stuck overseas.
 

Osotogari

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Two things I that strongly recommend that have actually saved my and/or other peoples' lives:

1.  Your own multifuel stove.  Mine is an MSR dragonfly.  I can't tell you how many times the issue coleman stove has crapped out, especially when colder than -25C.  The coleman 2-burners that we are issued are durable but they aren't very efficient with their burn rate vs BTUs produced. 

2.  Your own GPS.  For $200 or so, you can get a decent GPS.  If you want to pay extra for one with its own maps, go for it, but being able to get a 10-figure grid reference when you have a casualty or to back up for your nav should be the main criteria when choosing a GPS. Mine is an Etrex that I've had for almost a decade; the only downside is that these will probably be banned on your PLQ but there's not excuse for not having one in other circumstances.
 
 

LineJumper

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1 Lb brick of pemmican in a scent free bag. I've done 10 days on a Lb, just make sure you can find some food along the way before you run out. A few 1200 Cal mainstay works in a pinch too if you don't know how to render animal fat.
 

GnyHwy

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Osotogari said:
2.  Your own GPS.  For $200 or so, you can get a decent GPS.  If you want to pay extra for one with its own maps, go for it, but being able to get a 10-figure grid reference when you have a casualty or to back up for your nav should be the main criteria when choosing a GPS. Mine is an Etrex that I've had for almost a decade; the only downside is that these will probably be banned on your PLQ but there's not excuse for not having one in other circumstances.

I cannot and probably never will understand the need to buy a brand new $200 GPS for work.

1.  You are provided with one if you require it.
2.  Does a brand new GPS offer anything more than a 10 year old one?  Aside from the practically useless functions that manufacturers add to drive up price and attractability?

I am going to go out on a limb and say that there is an obscene amount of GPS receivers collecting dust in people's basements.  These receivers still perform the necessary functions that a person needs: produce an MGRS grid (UTM will even do as long as you know what you're doing), plan a route, provide a bearing and range to a target.  After that it's all fluff to me.

I do own a GPS, but it was given to me.  If you want a GPS, post a wanted ad on Kijiji.  Wanted:  GPS that produces MGRS coordinates.  Willing to pay $20.  I am confident someone will answer with a $50 bid at least.
 

Loachman

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Jim Seggie said:
Underarmour also sticks to you in an explosion or a fire. In fact, wearing underarmour with CADPAT is prohibited, as far as I know.

The polyester boxer shorts, the turtlenecky things, and almost everything else issued will burn and stick too - but they are not prohibited.
 

LineJumper

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Loachman said:
The polyester boxer shorts, the turtlenecky things, and almost everything else issued will burn and stick too - but they are not prohibited.

Boxer shorts aren't supposed to stick?
 

Osotogari

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1.  You are provided with one if you require it.

Optimistically, I would ammend that to say "You could be provided with one, if circumstances permit"

2.  Does a brand new GPS offer anything more than a 10 year old one?  Aside from the practically useless functions that manufacturers add to drive up price and attractability?

I'd start with Kijiji or eBay, caveat emptor.  Mine is 10 years old, and it works fine for me.  I bought it when issued GPS's were so difficult to get as to be almost non-existent. 

Newer ones can use colour topo maps, which may or may not be more up to date than some of the maps we're provided with.   

Furthermore, most of the time and with practise, good navigation will often mitigate the use of a GPS, but for odd time when the weather has moved in and/or when I've had a no-duff it has literally been a lifesaver.

Also, lifesavers are good for the field.  I like the red ones, but the green ones aren't bad either


 

chrisf

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2.  Does a brand new GPS offer anything more than a 10 year old one?  Aside from the practically useless functions that manufacturers add to drive up price and attractability?

Actually... yes they do in some cases...

I don't know about a 10 year old GPS receiver, but I've got two GPS receivers, one approx 15 years old (A magellan I believe) and another maybe 3 years old (A garmin).

The magellan needs to be outside to get a successful posistion lock, and won't work inside a vehicle, or heavy tree cover.

I've had the garmin get a successful lock in my basement.

There's a few advances (I don't recall exactly which ones, but I live with a geomatician, and I've had them all explained in detail) that do make a difference in new GPS receivers, however, an older GPS receiver will still provide accurate co-ordinates under appropriate conditions... and as a result of newer flashier models being very reasonably priced, you can probably pick up an older model cheap.
 

chrisf

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Osotogari said:
Optimistically, I would ammend that to say "You could be provided with one, if circumstances permit"

Or very often, if you ask...
 

VIChris

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I carry a small alpine stove, and generally a small Bialetti espresso machine as well. I can have two shots cooked, served and the equipment stowed in under 7 minutes. It's a great way to stave off the effects of inclement weather, or the morale suppression team. It's usually only there on vehicle ops with the SVC BN, but I dragged it to 5200ft on avalanche training, and it was well worth it.

This is the one, but they can be found at Homesense for abut the same price:
http://www.amazon.com/Bialetti-Express-2-Cup-Stovetop-Percolator/dp/B000NJHN30
 

GnyHwy

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To the OP,

Now that you have run out and got all the stuff listed in the thread, I think you will now need a truck.

A truck is a good thing to bring to the field.
 

cupper

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Little bit of a side track, but I'm looking at getting a set of safety glasses for use on jobsites and in precast concrete plants. I've been looking at Wiley X ballistic eyewear. I like the fact that you can get Light adjusting, and in prescription lenses.

Anyone who's used them have a review on how they work, fit, etc.?

Thanks in advance.
 

cupper

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PuckChaser said:
I love my trucksack.

Comes in light, medium and heavy models. ;D

Just make sure you have a Trucksack recovery tech available if it breaks down in the field.
 

PMedMoe

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cupper said:
Comes in light, medium and heavy models. ;D

Just make sure you have a Trucksack recovery tech available if it breaks down in the field.

A Sherpa?  ;D
 
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