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ADHD, ADD, and why we can't get in rants......

EpicBeardedMan

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Loachman said:
There is no need to go on and on in that fashion.

You may be an absolutely wonderful person in real life. That is not how you are coming across here, though, and not just in this last exchange. Some patience and diplomacy is seldom a bad thing.

Sorry I hurt your feelings in this post and apparently other posts.
 

Loachman

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My feelings are not hurt, but I thank you kindly for your concern.

Wind yourself back in.
 

Cbass216

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Hello,
I am a 21 year old university student that has dreamt of going into the army for a number of years. Recently i have applied for the CF as a weapon technician - land and was denied for ADHD (wrongly diagnosed) and Depression, this being at a very young age but have never taken any medication.
I have visited a psychiatrist and got everything in order clearing me up of both ailments and don't take medication for either and have not for over 10 years.
I have been told to send my files i have now to the recruiting medical offices in ottowa and was wondering if anyone has been through this process and what other avenue i can take to appeal the process?
Such as talking to my recruiter with files in hand or seeing a certain doctor, ect.
Thank you for reading this post.
 

sarahsmom

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They have special doctors in Ottawa who make these decisions on a case by case basis. Seeing your recruiter with your medical files in hand will do nothing.
The process for the appeal should have been outlined in your rejection letter. Follow those steps and *IF* it is something that needs re-evaluation or new information which changes your condition in THEIR eyes, you may be reconsidered for service.
It's not just the fact that you have never needed medication that is the issue. Depression can be a serious condition. The doctors and specialists in Ottawa will examine how they feel your condition might change if exposed to the hardships of tasking and deployments. While you may be perfectly healthy otherwise and your condition would not hinder your profession civvy-side, the military is an entirely different thing.
 

mariomike

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Cbass216 said:
I have been told to send my files i have now to the recruiting medical offices in ottowa and was wondering if anyone has been through this process and what other avenue i can take to appeal the process?

Challenging a medical decision/Requesting second review 
https://army.ca/forums/threads/37404/post-1461930.html#msg1461930

As always, Recruiting ( Medical ) is your most trusted source of official up to date information.

"Unofficial site, not associated with DND or the Canadian Armed Forces."

 

Xylric

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Had an interesting discussion with a group of retired US military members (consisting generally of officers who would be in a position to make the following observations). More or less, the claim was made from a former medical officer that it is reasonable to conclude that certain trades have a higher proportion of members with the traits of ADD/ADHD or ASD, among others, given that the beneficial advantage of these traits may serve well for the role - for example, a pilot who has an innate sense of where North is due to an enhanced sense of magneto-reception is going to be a far more effective navigator than someone who does not, just as someone whose brain has a quirk which makes the part of the brain which deals with math blend into their visual cortex is going to have a far better sense of aim.

Given, however, that these are US members who have all retired from service more than a decade ago, most of their information borders on useless, save for that which is empirically valid (such as the existence of a human magnetic sense - one of the officers now works as a physics professor, and demonstrates his own as a Day 1 demonstration). It does bring to mind a particular question - given that it is entirely possible for a person to reach adulthood without any form of diagnosis for neurodevelopmental conditions, what is likely to happen to someone who is only diagnosed during their service? I happen to personally know a Padre who was diagnosed with Aspergers less than a year after he retired from service, so I have reason to believe that there are others like themselves.

As for me, I was diagnosed with a learning disability as a child, but had my paperwork vanish over the years - most likely because as I am a twin, the existence of two files bearing the same surname with a minimal numerical difference led to a perfectly reasonable (though irritating) conclusion that one of those files was a duplicate. I'm 34 now, and I learned that I was in my second year of post-secondary education (so 15 years ago) when my mother finally stopped trying to figure out what had happened. Honestly? I like to think that I've done incredibly well for myself - I'm a member of MENSA, I run a business worth more than $700K, and honestly have never needed any medication. Most important thing I ever learned in my education was not just how I learn specifically, but how to enjoy learning. Whatever "disability" I had is either gone or has been turned into just another tool.

My attitude towards it is very simple - either it is going to pose an issue with my application, at which point I will be given an even greater knowledge of myself than I currently possess, or it is going to be a non-issue. Either way, I gain a productive benefit. I think this is the healthiest perspective to take.
 
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