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AUSTRALIAN BLACK HAWK LOSES ROTOR BLADE DURING SPECIAL OPERATIONS EXERCISE

Colin Parkinson

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A very close call for everyone involved, thing the pilot kept their cool and landed safely. Realistic training is important, but I suspect there will be some hard questions asked about this incident.


AU-1140x558.jpg
 

SeaKingTacco

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Point of fact: the Black Hawk in question did not ”lose” a rotor blade. If it did, it would have immediately and catastrophically self-destructed.

What actually happened was the tip of the rotor blade hit a mast. Not super awesome or good for your health, but a whole lot less dramatic.
 

Good2Golf

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Less the mast buffing, solid work by the crew to keep cool and conduct the pre-planned abort drill smoothly. Could have been much worse, but cool heads prevailed. MCT is at the edge of the envelope, particular at night when things would most likely happen operationally. ‘Train like you fight’ necessarily puts you at the edge often.
 

SeaKingTacco

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Less the mast buffing, solid work by the crew to keep cool and conduct the pre-planned abort drill smoothly. Could have been much worse, but cool heads prevailed. MCT is at the edge of the envelope, particular at night when things would most likely happen operationally. ‘Train like you fight’ necessarily puts you at the edge often.
Did you notice the mast appeared to be at the 2 o’clock position relative the helicopter? I was always taught, when conning, to keep obstacles out of 10 o’clock and 2 o’clock positions. These two places are the most difficult for a pilot to determine distance.
 

Good2Golf

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Absolutely, SKT. 11-1 or direct abeam is preferred, given the A-pillar in the cockpit blanking the 10 and 2 as you note. 11-1 is preferred since both pilots’ eyes have the obstacle, vice cross-cockpit issues for a beam obstacle where pretty much only the pilot on the controlling obstacle side is going to have an unrestricted view. Mr. Relative Wind also gets a vote though, and sometimes adds some spice to the evolution.
 
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