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Australian navy's hunt for new sub to replace Collins class

Underway

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That - in my crayon brain - is a good first step.
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Australia's going to (or have to) refit all the Collins to keep them going until the next generation UK reactor/sub is ready to go as all signs point to it being UK derived even though that makes little sense to me. What would make more sense would be to share the reactor between the US/UK/AUS. The UK is having a hard enough time keeping its small production running
I think that might be a good argument in favour of building the reactors in the UK. Smaller production means Aus orders are more easily fit into a schedule, gives the UK some breathing room between their own subs without losing the expertise, and ensures continuity of the program. We know the US will keep building. The UK getting an order sheet might be just what they need for nuke program stability.
 

Kirkhill

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Aussies on British nuke courses.


It would make sense.

The Brits are reliant on Yank technology. If the Aussies are happy with the Brit technology it leaves the Yanks with a tech cut-out between their world and their allies. They don't have to expose everything they know.
 

RDBZ

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Australia's going to (or have to) refit all the Collins to keep them going until the next generation UK reactor/sub is ready to go as all signs point to it being UK derived even though that makes little sense to me. What would make more sense would be to share the reactor between the US/UK/AUS. The UK is having a hard enough time keeping its small production running
Not sure which signs you're referring to, but there are those who believe the US invited the UK to join the program in order to interest them in aligning their future submarine programs with the US. The former defence minister Peter Dutton has made some interesting public comments, and the RAN will want a plan B.

The recently announced AUKUS hypersonic missile program was in fact a pre-existing Aus-US program the Brits were invited to join.

The RAN is very USN centric in combat systems and weapons, and integrating those into a UK design wouldn't necessarily be easy or quick.
 

suffolkowner

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Not sure which signs you're referring to, but there are those who believe the US invited the UK to join the program in order to interest them in aligning their future submarine programs with the US. The former defence minister Peter Dutton has made some interesting public comments, and the RAN will want a plan B.

The recently announced AUKUS hypersonic missile program was in fact a pre-existing Aus-US program the Brits were invited to join.

The RAN is very USN centric in combat systems and weapons, and integrating those into a UK design wouldn't necessarily be easy or quick.
Well there's this


but yeah its a difficult road the Aussies are embarking on. I believe the American subs are too big and too manpower intensive and strangely they seem to not be capable or inclined to increase production not that the Aussies dont need time to tool up. The UK and I expect the French too appear to be constrained by alternating attack and ballistic schedules and reactor design changes
 
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