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CH47 Chinook

dimsum

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CBH99 said:
The Australians also manage their defence budget a LOT differently/more effectively than we do.

Yes, and that's because they know they're the major "Western" power in that side of the world.  The Americans, even the ones in Japan, can't be guaranteed to send help in time.
 

Old Sweat

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We are getting off the track, and maybe this discussion re Australia can go elsewhere, but visualize a map projection centred on the centre of Australia. You are a long way from any allies except New Zealand, which is in virtually the same boat. The Aussies got a real scare in 1942 with the Japanese on their northern flank in New Guinea, Timor and the Solomons. Their active service army was overseas as was the bulk of their navy and airforce and the Brits were reluctant to return them home. In fact 9 Division in the Middle East was sent to defend Ceylon, not Australia. This made sense if one was viewing the strategic situation from London, but it sure didn't from the perspective of Cranberra.

With that in mind, the Australian approach makes a lot of sense.
 

Colin Parkinson

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Just spoke to a guy yesterday getting their new aircraft papers in order, A Cessna Caravan, just over 3 million, 300,000 for the floats alone!!! That's a production aircraft and accessory, aircraft are just darn expensive!
 

Loachman

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The Chinook project was cancelled this morning. All aircraft already delivered will be returned to Boeing for downgrading to regular F-model standard.
 

SeaKingTacco

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I heard that they were going to the MH Sqns, to be converted in to ASW aircraft.
 

Strike

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SeaKingTacco said:
I heard that they were going to the MH Sqns, to be converted in to ASW aircraft.

It's a great day to be MH!  ;D
 

Colin Parkinson

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Na, the Griffion did so well in Afghanistan, that PWGCS announced that we will be buying more of them and replacing all the Chinooks with Griffions, but only enough spare parts for 1/2 the fleet and no cross over training funds are to be had.
 

Retired AF Guy

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Loachman said:
The Chinook project was cancelled this morning. All aircraft already delivered will be returned to Boeing for downgrading to regular F-model standard.

Funny we haven't hear more about this?

In related news; Spotted one coming home from Bath on Friday afternoon. Heading east-west probably to CFB Trenton.
 

RubberTree

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But you are correct, there was one flying around Trenton on Friday afternoon for a couple of hours.
 

Loachman

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And it's hanging around there for a bit, but you'll not see it flying.
 

Colin Parkinson

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a rather negative article on the completion of a fairy decently done contract


http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/eight-year-odyssey-to-buy-battlefield-helicopters-comes-to-an-end-265751551.html


PETAWAWA, Ont. - New military helicopters that were ordered eight years ago to fill an urgent need over the battlefields of Kandahar have finally all been delivered — three years after the end of Canada's combat mission in Afghanistan.

Defence Minister Rob Nicholson was on hand today as the last of 15 Chinook helicopters touched down at its home base in Garrison Petawawa, Ont., about 170 kilometres northwest of Ottawa.

The choppers were initially ordered in the summer of 2006 by one of Nicholson's predecessors, Gordon O'Connor, as the army was being further drawn into a nasty guerilla war with the Taliban.

The helicopters were considered essential to keep soldiers off the bomb-sown roads of Kandahar province.

The Harper government made them the subject of a sole-source contract with U.S. defence giant Boeing, but getting them through the air force and defence bureaucracy proved to be frustrating.

It took a recommendation from the Manley commission to force the purchase of six older, used CH-47Ds for use in Afghanistan at a cost of $292 million — helicopters that were eventually junked after the war.

The entire program — both acquisition and long-term support — cost $5 billion in total.

As part of the industrial offsets, Boeing has committed to spend $2.95-billion in Canada.

Despite the delays and setbacks, Nicholson said the occasion was cause for celebration.

"The delivery of the 15th and final Chinook helicopter demonstrates our government's strong commitment to providing our men and women in uniform with the right equipment to perform their jobs," he said in a statement.

"The Canadian Chinook F-model — designed especially for Canada's demanding operational and environmental requirements — will provide increased mobility and flexibility to the Royal Canadian Air Force as they protect Canadians, and Canadian interests, at home and abroad."

The air force did fly Chinooks for decades, but they were sold off to the Dutch in the early 1990s by the Mulroney government in a cost-cutting exercise that was part of its so-called peace dividend at the end of the Cold War.

Ironically, Canadian troops hitched rides on those same helicopters in Afghanistan before they got their own.
 

Good2Golf

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Fact check fail - contract signed in June of 2009, not 2006.  That means the procurement went from contract award to full fleet delivery in five years, not eight. 

Perhaps the author meant to refer to the initial stand up of the project in late 2005/early 2006, following the programmatic steps of requirement identification leading to capability definition, after which contract award leading to system development and implementation?  Or maybe the reporter just got their facts wrong.  The contract award in 2009 is a matter of public record.

Regards
G2G
 

PuckChaser

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Lets not get facts in the way of a smear piece on the Tories. After all, I'm positive they didn't go and get some D models to fly around until the F models were ready, almost a year after contract award. Oh wait....
 

CougarKing

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For Chinook watchers:

Flight Global

Dutch to acquire 14 more CH-47F rotorcraft

08 SEPTEMBER, 2015 BY: ANNO GRAVEMAKER
The Dutch defence ministry is to acquire 14 new Boeing CH-47F transport helicopters, in an expansion of its existing rotorcraft capabilities.

Recognising the Chinook’s importance in missions such as deploying quick reaction forces and humanitarian assistance, the Dutch air force has decided to retire its 10 ageing CH-47Ds – which were delivered from 1995 – and upgrade its existing six F-model examples, which entered use from 2013.



(...SNIPPED)
 

SeaKingTacco

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It will be interesting to see if they opt for the Canadian modifications. If they do, IIRC, we get paid.
 
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