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Electrical Distribution Technician ( EDT )

fordgru

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Hi everyone,

New member here lol. Im currently a 3rd level 309A electrical apprentice and will be graduating from a 3 year construction engineering technology advance diploma from George Brown College in Toronto.

I've read and watched the video explaining the trade and i am very interested in joining.

Anyways, my question is what should i expect? What would a typical posting be like? and what would it mean if i was deployed to another base? would i only stay on the base or would i be ordered to leave on patrol?

Thanks for you help!!
 

Smirnoff123

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You would not be deployed to another base within Canada you would be posted to one. In Canada, you will not be leaving the base to do patrols, in that trade I would be surprised if it even happened over in Afghanistan.

However in addition to your trade you will also have to stay qualified on the weapons and practise your soldiering skills on the occasional exercise.
 

fordgru

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C.G.R said:
You would not be deployed to another base within Canada you would be posted to one. In Canada, you will not be leaving the base to do patrols, in that trade I would be surprised if it even happened over in Afghanistan.

However in addition to your trade you will also have to stay qualified on the weapons and practise your soldiering skills on the occasional exercise.

Thanks for the response!!

My ultimate question is what are the chance for deployment over seas and would the job description entail when over seas?

Soldier first - trade second  ... so when posted over seas what does the job entail?

thanks for all your assistance!
 

Smirnoff123

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Seeing as we are on our way out of Afghanistan your chances of deploying are zero, until something else comes around. As far as what your specific duties would be, I couldnt tell you anything more than what the recruiting website says as I am not in that trade.
 

fordgru

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Thanks!

Just curious as too when an technician is deployed over seas. Wondering if you stay on the base or your put out on patrol etc..
 

PMedMoe

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fordgru said:
Wondering if you stay on the base or your put out on patrol etc..

Out of my lane, but I really, really, really, really doubt you'd be on patrol.  Really.

You seem rather hung up on that...
 

blacktriangle

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PMedMoe said:
Out of my lane, but I really, really, really, really doubt you'd be on patrol.  Really.

You seem rather hung up on that...

I'd send him on garbage patrol.
 

Smirnoff123

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If going on patrols is that important to you, join the combat arms and after youve had enough transfer to this trade.
 
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MikeL

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fordgru said:
Soldier first - trade second

Don't read too much into that and thinking you can be employed as a Infantryman.  Overseas you would be working within your trade/position and doing the duties required of a Electrical Distribution Technician.  AFAIK that does not include going on patrols. 


As a Soldier,  you will do the BMQ-Land course as well as your annual PWT(to which ever standard is required of your trade/unit) as well as the BFT(13km ruck march, etc) - unless this has changed due to the new FORCE test.  During the year,  you may have IBTS week where you will do some "Soldier stuff" such as TOETs on different weapons(or maybe only your C7) and some range time(maybe only for your C7), plus other requirements such as CBRN, etc

During work up training you may get trained on more,  all depends on the theatre and what is required for your position.  The basics will be some ranges on your pers weapon,  convoy,  first aid/combat first aid, etc
 

Smirnoff123

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Don't read too much into that...

I think that it is a very important mentality to have regardless if you never end up doing the pointy end stuff. To many people lose it and just treat their trade like a regular 9 to 5.
 
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MikeL

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C.G.R said:
I think that it is a very important mentality to have regardless if you never end up doing the pointy end stuff. To many people lose it and just treat their trade like a regular 9 to 5.

There is a difference between maintaining your basic soldier skills/being prepared to use them(and learning advanced skills if you have the opportunity) and thinking you are going to be out clearing grape huts or trenches with the infantry as a *insert CSS trade here*

Certain support trades are part of a Rifle Coy, and can go out on patrols/operations with the Coy.  They would be trained up to do their job supporting the Infantry as well as having a good grasp on the soldier skills so they can fulfil their job requirements. 

Trades such as those in EME can be part of a MRT crew attached to a Combat Team, etc but they would be there to keep the combat team's vehicles, equipment, etc working/funcitional.  They could find themselves being shot at,  hit a IED, etc.  So yes it is important to maintain your skills,  but you have to be realistic in your expectations and what you could actually be employed doing.
 

fordgru

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Thanks for all the informations, I just want to have a clear understanding of the job description etc.

You've all helped a lot, so thank you for all your input!
 
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Hello!

Applied for the Electrical Distribution Tech trade and was interested to see if anyone else had applied or is currently enrolled! Would love to pick your brain!
 

mariomike

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kailee.macisaac said:
Would love to pick your brain!

This may help,

Electrical Technician vs. Electrical Distribution Technician?
http://army.ca/forums/threads/119977.0

RE: Electrical Distribution Technician 
http://army.ca/forums/threads/109711.0

Electrical Distribution Technician
https://www.google.ca/search?q=site%3Aarmy.ca+Electrical+Distribution+Technician&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-CA:IE-Address&ie=&oe=&rlz=1I7GGHP_en-GBCA592&gfe_rd=cr&ei=kcdkVsLxCIHd8gf8paeADA&gws_rd=ssl

Electrical Distribution Technician,
For applicants who have a Department of National Defense Certificate of Military Achievement with a QL5 rating and rank of corporal in one of nine matched trades (below), a copy of your Member’s Personnel Record Resume (MPRR) is sufficient evidence of your qualifications and experience; once submitted, the College will verify the validity of your certification and approve you to write the C of Q exam without further training.
http://www.collegeoftrades.ca/wp-content/uploads/Trade-Equivalency-Assessment-Application-Guide-March-2015-FINAL.pdf
See page 3.

ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION TECHNICIAN

GRANT: whether you’re in the Regular Force or the Reserve, electrical distribution work in the military is similar to what you’d do in the same trade on the civilian side. That means installing residential, commercial and industrial-grade wiring in all kinds of buildings.

CONNELL: But there’s a lot more to an ED Tech’s job than that: we can go from running simple electrical circuits for plugs and lights to pole climbing and working on bucket trucks, installing hardware on power lines and transformers, even laying in runway lights for the Air Force.

GRANT: I really like the fact that my job is different every day – that’s something you’re not likely going to find working as an electrician on the civilian side.

CONNELL: With the military, you can still do your job, it just has a broader scope. We can come in and be pulling wires, or working on panels, or we can be doing high-voltage work and working on an airfield or a fire alarm system. And it’s pretty rewarding at the end of the day.

GRANT: It’s on deployment that you really feel like you’re part of a big team.

Comradeship in the Forces is one of the best things about it. You make friends that you can’t make on civilian street being an electrician. And you experience things that most people will never experience in their life. While I was in Afghanistan, we maintained all the Canadian assets in Kandahar, we designed buildings such as the Canada House, lighting and power for a hockey rink; we also did jobs out in the forward operating bases where we’d go out and provide power for showers, and heat, air conditioning for the soldiers that are out fighting in the front lines.

CONNELL: You’ve got a job to do, and a tight timeline to do it, and you get a real feeling of satisfaction when you get it done.

The most rewarding part of the job, I’d say, is getting to work with the other trades, getting to learn other trades and I really enjoy the opportunities that they provide for us to continue our education.

GRANT: You don’t already have to be a working professional electrician to become an ED Tech in the Canadian Forces.

CONNELL: The military will train you and take you right through your apprentice and journeyman status.

GRANT: After your basic military training, the first semester of course work to become an Electrical Distribution Technician will bring you here to Gagetown and the School of Military Engineering for about six months.

You’ll start with the basics of wiring and circuitry, how to read blueprints, set up security and fire-alarm systems, and they’ll introduce you to specific military applications like airfield lighting.

CONNELL: After the first course, you’ll be assigned to an Army, Navy or Air Force base in Canada for about two years of on-the-job experience.

GRANT: Then it’s back to Gagetown for another 6-month course to complete your qualification.

CONNELL: We’re very fortunate to be doing the job we love and supporting the mission at the same time.

I’d say it’s a really rewarding job. It not only challenges you mentally, but it challenges you physically too.

GRANT: An ED Tech in the military is trained in many aspects of electrical. And also we train with weapons and in combat. It’s very exciting and that’s my favourite part about the job, is deploying overseas and really making a difference in a country and making a difference for our troops.


 

mariomike

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kailee.macisaac said:
Thank you for the information! Very appreciated. Just waiting on the call for BMQ.

You are welcome. Good luck.

 

mariomike

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Saw this question asked and answered in Ask a CAF Recruiter. Adding here for reference,

Education requirements to become an electrical distribution technician 
http://milnet.ca/forums/threads/122930/post-1435455/topicseen.html#new
"I want to apply to become an electrical distribution technician in the army."
 

Zmar

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I'm extremely  interested in joining the armed forces as an EDT, my concern is that I'm already a working 3rd year apprentice and I'm worried about losing all my trade time in the event I don't want serve past the initial service time
 
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