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Weinie

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First to Fight: The Polish War 1939
By Roger Moorhouse
Genre: Military History (World War II)

One aspect of World War II history that is glossed over is that of the defence of Poland by the Polish forces. One of the reasons for this is history is written by the winners and poor Poland was "liberated" from the Germans by the Soviet Army. The Soviets did their best to suppress knowledge of the beginning part of the War so as to keep knowledge of what they did to the poor country quiet. Poland during WWII due to its geographic location had the misfortune in September 1939 of not only being invaded by German forces from the west but also Russian forces from the east due to the secret Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact which divided the country between the two countries.

This book seeks to overcome the lack of knowledge about the defence of Poland by its forces as well as dispel some of the myths that have risen about the battles. I think the book did an excellent job of describing the battles and atrocities that occurred during the occupation of Poland by two ruthless forces. The author also does a good job of explaining how due to its location the nation had been screwed over by various nations (Russia, Prussia, France, etc..) over the centuries. The author also includes some good maps and photos that help you understand the information presented.

If you are interested in military history especially that of WWII history then this book is highly recommended. It will give you a greater knowledge of what occurred during what we sometimes call "The Phoney War" period of WWII, a period that no Poles would call Phoney as it is estimated that 200,000 Polish (military and civilian) citizens were killed during that period.
I don't know if you have ever been to Poland, but their collective hatred of Russia is intense.
 

mariomike

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( President ) Harry Truman's Excellent Adventure: The True Story of a Great American Road Trip​

When President Truman left office, he bought a Chrysler New Yorker, and drove it from Missouri to New York City and back home again. A 2,500 mile journey. Before the age of super-highways that bypassed Main Street America.

Just him and his wife. ( There was no Secret Service protection for former presidents in those days. )

It was something no former president has done before, or since.
 

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PMedMoe

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( President ) Harry Truman's Excellent Adventure: The True Story of a Great American Road Trip​

When President Truman left office, he bought a Chrysler New Yorker, and drove it from Missouri to New York City and back home again. A 2,500 mile journey. Before the age of super-highways that bypassed Main Street America.

Just him and his wife. ( There was no Secret Service protection for former presidents in those days. )

It was something no former president has done before, or since.
Sounds interesting. I am currently rereading Blue Highways: A Journey into America by William Least Heat Moon.

In 1978, after separating from his wife and losing his job as a teacher, Heat-Moon, 38 at the time, took an extended road trip in a circular route around the United States, sticking to only the "Blue Highways". He had coined the term to refer to small, forgotten, out-of-the-way roads connecting rural America (which were drawn in blue on the old style Rand McNally road atlas).
 

dimsum

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Sounds interesting. I am currently rereading Blue Highways: A Journey into America by William Least Heat Moon.

In 1978, after separating from his wife and losing his job as a teacher, Heat-Moon, 38 at the time, took an extended road trip in a circular route around the United States, sticking to only the "Blue Highways". He had coined the term to refer to small, forgotten, out-of-the-way roads connecting rural America (which were drawn in blue on the old style Rand McNally road atlas).
When we can travel again, I'd love to do a road trip eastwards. PEI is the only province I haven't been to yet.

I already avoid highways if at all possible, unless it would take too much more time.
 

PMedMoe

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When we can travel again, I'd love to do a road trip eastwards. PEI is the only province I haven't been to yet.

I already avoid highways if at all possible, unless it would take too much more time.
It's much harder to avoid highways in Canada than in the U.S. Unless you really want to go out of your way. ;)
 

daftandbarmy

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I see Robin on LinkedIn alot.... it's good to see someone like that come out of the shadows and express his opinion from time to time in that kind of forum. Too many keep quiet about too many things, I find. And he's pretty funny too:

'As I pointed my rifle at the pub, I rested the magazine on the grass. Instead of coming to rest on soft turf, it scraped a metal surface. I pulled away the grass to discover a galvanized builder's bucket, half buried in the ground, with cardboard taped onto the open end. It was buried sideways in the mound of earth on which I lay, and was pointing towards the wall of the post office. It was a claymore mine, a directional bomb which, when it exploded, would send its shrapnel towards the wall, killing anyone standing there. I crawled back, keeping low in case anyone was waiting to fire it, then I scampered around the corner of the building and reported what I had seen to my patrol corporal, Pete Light, who radioed in the news. The operations officer at the time had received the same training as we had before deploying to Northern Ireland. He had seen the photos of bodies blown to bits by bombs, of headless corpses and butcher's slabs of meat. He had been taught that if a suspect device was found, it should not be touched. Yet his first command to Pete was to go and take another look, to make sure.'


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dangerboy

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Just finished reading The Madman and the Butcher: the Sensational Wars of Sam Hughes and General Arthur Currie by Tim Cook (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9371064-the-madman-and-the-butcher).

I enjoyed the book and thought the author did a good job of explaining these two important Canadian World War One figures. I especially liked the portion of the book talking about the libel trial. Recommend this book to anyone interested in Canadian military history. 9371064.jpg
 

Journeyman

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