Author Topic: General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]  (Read 19384 times)

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LightFighter

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Re: General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]
« Reply #25 on: August 04, 2017, 19:47:39 »


    Added questions after reading and researching other posts that were not clearly outlined in the original post/thread:

    • Because I have no set residence and just travel and live where I want to (not quite a "homeless person" but still have no mailing address or place of residence) will that make it more difficult for enrollment? I live and work wherever I want to and live a free life, not being held down by conventional living standards and am a very clean well kept individual. (You wouldn't guess that I was actually homeless unless you asked me.)
    • Where should I apply to if I live in this type of situation? I am going to join the regular forces and do everything full-time and live on base for the duration of training before deployment. (If at all possible)
    • There are many choices of trades to take within the military and I am still unsure what would best suit my abilities and keep me challenged. When I was 19 I went to a recruiting office in Winnipeg and the recruitment officer was looking to get me into logistics... I'm not going to work as a warehouse person. (I honestly don't care about the paycheck, what I care about is the skills and experience I gain and what the military needs from me.)
    • When I join, I would like to do full-time training with very little respite between, am I forced to wait for specific dates for certain areas? Or could I simply travel to a new training site and continue training?
    • From the answers given Navy is a great way to travel and as mentioned, that's if you are LUCKY, though I'm not interesting in only port cities and want to focus on humanitarian missions for the most part. Because of all my current skills I feel I would be an asset to crews helping to rebuild or stabilize countries currently experiencing hardships such as Yemen, Syria, Sudan, etc.


    I will most likely add to this list and edit (strikeout) it as answers are given.

    I hope this is not too much for people to handle, or maybe it is just enough, in any case, if anyone has questions, feel free to ask, I'm an open book.

    Thanks everyone for taking your time to read all of this and for taking your time to reply.

    I look forward to potentially becoming a part of the family and can't wait to gain the skills and experience I am looking for!

    Will Flett



    PS: After researching, I do not think reserves would suit my situation because I travel wherever I want to and if I would stay at any one location, it would be for short-term unless there is a substantial reasoning behind it.

    Because of this I've decided to join the Regular Forces, before anything is said, I can accomplish anything, period. I have the willpower and drive to push through anything I need or want to... This is my reasoning for traveling and not needing to live a conventional life.[/list]

    Unless you are willing to change your life style and accept you won't be able to do anything you want at anytime the military isn't for you. Your nomadic life style may cause some road bumps in recruiting. As well, in the military you will not be busy every day, training non stop.  There will be times where nothing is happening. Also, may not get any deployments depending on how long you are in for. As well, they may be combat orientated and you won't go in a humanitarian mission, etc.

    If you wish to help rebuild war ravaged countries, look into other organizations that are actually focused on that.
    « Last Edit: August 04, 2017, 19:50:59 by LightFighter »

    Offline mariomike

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    Re: General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]
    « Reply #26 on: August 04, 2017, 19:58:49 »
    WFlett, regarding deployment,

    Possibility of deployment 
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=124754.0

    Can someone throw me a friggin deployment????!!! 
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=103498.0

    Chances of Deployment ?
    https://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=105273.0

    Deployment probabilities 
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=104102.0
    2 pages

    Curious about deployment rates if anyone can help?
    https://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=121073.0

    Voluntary Deployment??? 
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=98932.0

    Wanna join, but what if I don't wanna deploy? (merged)
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,89177.0/nowap.html
    4 pages

    Reserves and Deployment 
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=102409.0
    2 pages.

    Deployment Tempo 
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,39949.0/nowap.html
    2 pages.

    TOURS AS NCM INF PRIVATE
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=122685.0

    Deployment length?
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=110691.0

    Deployment duration
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=36345.0
    2 pages.

    Timeframe before deployment for infantry res
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,110399.0/nowap.html

    BMQ to Deployment Timeline 
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=87928.0

    Deployment
    https://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=104765.0

    etc...

    See also,

    Operations update
    "The Canadian Armed Forces operations monthly public affairs narrative is designed to give an up-to-date overview of ongoing Canadian Armed Forces missions in Canada, North America and around the world."
    http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/operations/update.page
    Date modified: 2017-08-04

    Because I have no set residence and just travel and live where I want to (not quite a "homeless person" but still have no mailing address or place of residence) will that make it more difficult for enrollment?

    You can ask questions regarding your application here,

    General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]
    http://navy.ca/forums/index.php/topic,107882.0.html
    34 pages.


    « Last Edit: August 04, 2017, 20:12:45 by mariomike »

    Offline WFlett

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    Re: General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]
    « Reply #27 on: August 04, 2017, 20:12:31 »
      Unless you are willing to change your life style and accept you won't be able to do anything you want at anytime the military isn't for you. Your nomadic life style may cause some road bumps in recruiting. As well, in the military you will not be busy every day, training non stop.  There will be times where nothing is happening. Also, may not get any deployments depending on how long you are in for. As well, they may be combat orientated and you won't go in a humanitarian mission, etc.

      If you wish to help rebuild war ravaged countries, look into other organizations that are actually focused on that.
    As mentioned, yes, I am willing to change my life style if there is an acceptable reasoning behind it that offers me the ability to gain more experience and skills. As well, I do look forward to making the forces a life-long commitment, but to do so, I need to make a conscientious decision about it. I'm not like most of the high-school kids or younger adults who are looking at joining the military on a whim (though I can not speak for them personally from what I've been reading). This is something I feel I could make a difference with, where my hard work will actually pay off. Too many times have I worked better and harder than my coworkers only to find myself with more responsibilities and less pay or recognition than people who simply have worked there for a longer time.

    Also, from what I understand the Canadian Military focuses on humanitarian aid or supporting other military organizations... Also from the threads posted by mariomike, many people mentioned that they were doing humanitarian aid while traveling, not specifically being posted as a humanitarian officer, but simply pitching in with the local communities as they traveled.

    Eventually, if/when I am forced to take time off or between deployments, I will be joining those humanitarian organizations, my skills in the military will prove a life-long asset for being a part of those kinds of operations, either as security or humanitarian aid.[/list]
    I've never owned any fire-arms and have only shot a basic .22 rifle and a 12 gauge shotgun.

    Based on my research, when I purchase any fire-arms, they would be:

    My dream rifle: IWI - Tavor or X-95 (have to use myself)
    My dream pistol: Sig Sauer - P226 MK25
    My dream shotgun: Kel-Tek - KSG

    I like my bull-pups. Can't wait to see each in action.

    Offline mariomike

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    Re: General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]
    « Reply #28 on: August 04, 2017, 20:17:17 »
    Also, from what I understand the Canadian Military focuses on humanitarian aid or supporting other military organizations...

    Chances of going overseas for Peacekeeping/Humanitarian Missions?
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=122872.0

    The Canadian Peacekeeping Myth (Merged Topics)
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=29913.0
    12 pages.

    Military Ill-prepared for Peacekeeping - G&M
    http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=121925.0
    2 pages.

    etc...

    LightFighter

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    Re: General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]
    « Reply #29 on: August 04, 2017, 20:24:44 »
      As mentioned, yes, I am willing to change my life style if there is an acceptable reasoning behind it that offers me the ability to gain more experience and skills. As well, I do look forward to making the forces a life-long commitment, but to do so, I need to make a conscientious decision about it. I'm not like most of the high-school kids or younger adults who are looking at joining the military on a whim (though I can not speak for them personally from what I've been reading). This is something I feel I could make a difference with, where my hard work will actually pay off. Too many times have I worked better and harder than my coworkers only to find myself with more responsibilities and less pay or recognition than people who simply have worked there for a longer time.

      You may work harder than others, and you still may feel "screwed" over, etc in the Military. Also, you will make less money than people with more time in, regardless if you believe they are doing less work.

      Yes, if you put your time in and get the required courses to advance in rank you will advance, but starting as a fresh private will take some time to get to that level. 


      Also, from what I understand the Canadian Military focuses on humanitarian aid or supporting other military organizations... Also from the threads posted by mariomike, many people mentioned that they were doing humanitarian aid while traveling, not specifically being posted as a humanitarian officer, but simply pitching in with the local communities as they traveled.

      The military is not focused on humanitarian work. I've been deployed twice, not once have I done humanitarian work like rebuilding a community, or helping locals outside of assisting with the security of the area and being in a patrol where toys and candy was passed to some local kids.  Not have I ever been on any training focused on humanitarian work.

      The DART does conduct humanitarian type rebuilding work, etc when deployed. You may never be tasked to this organization however when they deploy.  This will also depend on where you are posted and your trade.

      Eventually, if/when I am forced to take time off or between deployments, I will be joining those humanitarian organizations, my skills in the military will prove a life-long asset for being a part of those kinds of operations, either as security or humanitarian aid.[/list]

      What if you won't be allowed to join those organizations while in, as well you may also not be authorized to travel to the countries you wish to help out.









       
      « Last Edit: August 04, 2017, 20:28:44 by LightFighter »

      Offline WFlett

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      Re: General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]
      « Reply #30 on: August 04, 2017, 20:33:02 »
      Chances of going overseas for Peacekeeping/Humanitarian Missions?
      http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=122872.0

      The Canadian Peacekeeping Myth (Merged Topics)
      http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=29913.0
      12 pages.

      Military Ill-prepared for Peacekeeping - G&M
      http://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=121925.0
      2 pages.

      etc...

      Thank you so very much mariomike, you've helped out so much, I have no way to express it other than a couple good old emoji'  :salute: :cdnsalute:

      So far I've read through everything up to the CSOR or CANSOFCOM and am working my way through the banter of the thread picking out the real information needed or pertaining to my question(s) and interests.

      I'm interesting in the next section, researching about your gear/equipment available, all in due time...

      Admittedly, I've refined a lot of my questions after reading those threads and will be constantly doing so the more I read, no doubt.

      Merci, Xie xie, Spacibo and thank you very much!


      You may work harder than others, and you still may feel "screwed" over, etc in the Military. Also, you will make less money than people with more time in, regardless if you believe they are doing less work.

      Yes, if you put your time in and get the required courses to advance in rank you will advance, but starting as a fresh private will take some time to get to that level. 


      The military is not focused on humanitarian work. I've been deployed twice, not once have I done humanitarian work like rebuilding a community, or helping locals outside of assisting with the security of the area and being in a patrol where toys and candy was passed to some local kids.  Not have I ever been on any training focused on humanitarian work.

      The DART does conduct humanitarian type rebuilding work, etc when deployed. You may never be tasked to this organization however when they deploy.  This will also depend on where you are posted and your trade.

      What if you won't be allowed to join those organizations while in, as well you may also not be authorized to travel to the countries you wish to help out.

      Sorry I completely missed your reply and thank you for your hands on experience and clarification.

      I'm sure that the feeling of being "screwed over" happens anywhere, but at least I would be accomplishing a life-goal and gaining experience anyways. When not doing piece work or working on commission, I've worked many different jobs in various fields, as you could tell by my original post, those didn't give me any more skills but allowed me to hone my leadership skills and experience, as mentioned, I would always be put into a leadership and training role... often within months or even weeks of starting a new job.

      How do you know whether or not you are or would be authorized to travel? Are you given orders not to leave province or country at all while in the regular forces?

      This is fine, as long as I am allowed to receive other training, out of my own pocket of course, or at the very least be involved with extra curricular studies, training or activities on base. Even squad/unit training or building exercises.

      I will most likely be reading about the intricacies of deployment once I get to the threads posted by mariomike, but your own knowledge and experience is extremely helpful and I appreciate you keeping up to date with my thread and offering your own expertise and experience.
      « Last Edit: August 04, 2017, 21:09:14 by WFlett »
      I've never owned any fire-arms and have only shot a basic .22 rifle and a 12 gauge shotgun.

      Based on my research, when I purchase any fire-arms, they would be:

      My dream rifle: IWI - Tavor or X-95 (have to use myself)
      My dream pistol: Sig Sauer - P226 MK25
      My dream shotgun: Kel-Tek - KSG

      I like my bull-pups. Can't wait to see each in action.

      LightFighter

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      Re: General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]
      « Reply #31 on: August 04, 2017, 21:33:07 »
      I'm sure that the feeling of being "screwed over" happens anywhere, but at least I would be accomplishing a life-goal and gaining experience anyways. When not doing piece work or working on commission, I've worked many different jobs in various fields, as you could tell by my original post, those didn't give me any more skills but allowed me to hone my leadership skills and experience, as mentioned, I would always be put into a leadership and training role... often within months or even weeks of starting a new job

      I'm sure you can use some of those qualities in the Militay, but I hope you aren't expecting to be placed quickly into a leadership role in the Military if you join as a NCM.

      How do you know whether or not you are or would be authorized to travel? Are you given orders not to leave province or country at all while in the regular forces?

      Before you can go on leave, you will submit a leave pass that has to be approved, on the leave pass you say where you will be during that period.  As well, there is a phone number you are supposed to call when you plan on travelling abroad, as well they will give you information relevant to the countries you wish to visit, etc.  Also, a leave pass will be required anytime you will be leaving the geographical area for weekend travel.

      Also, if the Canadians government travel website says travel to a certain country should be avoided, chances are you won't be authorized to go there.
      https://travel.gc.ca/travelling/advisories

      This is fine, as long as I am allowed to receive other training, out of my own pocket of course, or at the very least be involved with extra curricular studies, training or activities on base. Even squad/unit training or building exercises.

      You can take civilian courses on your off time, provided they won't interfere with work. Keep in mind if you get injured doing flying suit or BASE jumping over the weekend, they may not be thrilled especially if the injury prevents you from going on course or exercise. The base may have clubs you can join that offer certain activities. You can join clubs off base, as well as do schooling online, etc.

      In the Infantry your leadership may run low level training for the platoon when nothing is going on during the day(working hours).
      « Last Edit: August 04, 2017, 21:41:00 by LightFighter »

      Offline WFlett

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      Re: General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]
      « Reply #32 on: August 04, 2017, 22:15:51 »
      I'm sure you can use some of those qualities in the Militay, but I hope you aren't expecting to be placed quickly into a leadership role in the Military if you join as a NCM.

      Before you can go on leave, you will submit a leave pass that has to be approved, on the leave pass you say where you will be during that period.  As well, there is a phone number you are supposed to call when you plan on travelling abroad, as well they will give you information relevant to the countries you wish to visit, etc.  Also, a leave pass will be required anytime you will be leaving the geographical area for weekend travel.

      Also, if the Canadians government travel website says travel to a certain country should be avoided, chances are you won't be authorized to go there.
      https://travel.gc.ca/travelling/advisories

      You can take civilian courses on your off time, provided they won't interfere with work. Keep in mind if you get injured doing flying suit or BASE jumping over the weekend, they may not be thrilled especially if the injury prevents you from going on course or exercise. The base may have clubs you can join that offer certain activities. You can join clubs off base, as well as do schooling online, etc.

      In the Infantry your leadership may run low level training for the platoon when nothing is going on during the day(working hours).

      Thanks for more clarification, also I do understand what you mean about injuries, you do never know what could happen, but training to prepare for anything is one of the reasons why I am looking at joining the CF. Working out, increasing cardio, endurance, etc. will also be a huge facet of going through the different training programs.

      Also no, I do not expect to just jump in and magically become an officer, commander or even a leader instantly. I like to prove my worth and earn my respect, which is why I get placed into the positions mentioned.

      I just have to say, with your self described levels of awesome in all facets of human existence, I would recommend direct entry as a Top Gun SERE instructor.

      I'm sorry but I didn't intend on describing myself as being "awesome in all facets of human existence", I simply described myself as I am, I'm honest, sometimes overly honest.

      I did mention that I'm not the best at cardio, but could lightly jog 2.4 kms in 12 minutes, I walk 1.5-2 kms in 15-20 minutes (used to walk daily to work).

      Simply put, I am above average in most regards, because I try, I push myself, I have the willpower and drive to accomplish my goals... Why else would I choose a life-style of hardship. Why else would I sell everything I own, my big screen TV, gaming computer, Xbone, all of that crap to push for a life-long journey. To experience life and what it has to offer, to meet new people, see nature and test my own capabilities...

      Who knows, I might die while attempting to survive through the winter in the BC mountains before I ever join the military, if that's the case, that is my prerogative.

      Otherwise, if you think that what I simply posted so people can help me accurately decide where to focus my efforts in joining the CF, then thank you very much.

      You too are awesome, just focus on your goals and life aspirations, don't let anyone deny you what is necessary for you to have a complete life.
      I've never owned any fire-arms and have only shot a basic .22 rifle and a 12 gauge shotgun.

      Based on my research, when I purchase any fire-arms, they would be:

      My dream rifle: IWI - Tavor or X-95 (have to use myself)
      My dream pistol: Sig Sauer - P226 MK25
      My dream shotgun: Kel-Tek - KSG

      I like my bull-pups. Can't wait to see each in action.

      Offline WFlett

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      Re: General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]
      « Reply #33 on: August 04, 2017, 23:36:34 »
      You probably have little to no idea of what the CAF will give you for equipment let alone the policies on non issue items. Yet you are already planning on buying all kinds of gear? 

      What gear and specialized equipment are you planning on getting?

      Depending on your unit, you may not be allowed anything that wasn't issued. With the units that do allow non issue kit, there are still rules/limits to that. Get in, finish your training, once you get to a unit and some time in see what other people have an go from there.

      Now that I've officially researched the threads given to me and re-researched my previous studies to verify what I understood from before.

      You are absolutely right, I have no idea exactly what type of gear I would be receiving, never-mind mission specific or even platoon specific gear I would be receiving.

      All I knew from before was that if you wanted to buy your own gear it had to be green (even if you're in a desert), such as non mission specific gear, ie. boots, gloves, goggles, hats, etc.

      Also to specify, I wasn't planning on buying "all kinds of gear", just gear that I could keep for myself and also to update or customize my own mission-ready gear. I know that with a full mission-ready setup you are looking at carrying minimum of 150lbs of gear, I'm not sure if that includes water, ammunition, grenades, etc.

      I'm not sure if your gear is your own when you receive it, or whether or not you could use it on your own excursions... For example, if I received a bivy, bag, sleeping solution, webbing, etc. could I trek through and camp on my own time with it? Or are you only allowed to use your gear while on-mission? I wasn't expecting to be able to honestly, which is why I was mentioning I would get my own gear.

      On a note of purchasing and using your own fire-arms, I knew from years ago that asking the question, "Can I buy my own rifle to use on-mission." Was ridiculous and you were beaten with a stupid stick, at least that's what I witnessed after using the search feature years ago.

      What I'm not sure about is why not? If you have a rifle that is compatible with military issued 5.56 NATO rounds, why can't you bring it? I'm sure the obvious answer is, if something breaks you won't have the replacement parts for it... At the same time, you don't carry an entire replacement rifle to replace whatever parts that may break anyways.

      Also what about pistols? Are you only ever issued one pistol?

      Personally I'm sure that the C7-C8 are great rifles, but why not be capable of purchasing your own weapon, with your own money to protect your own and your squads life(s)?

      Also, back in the day when I searched about this last time, nearly 10 years ago, from what I remember only Riflemen or Weapons Specialists were the only ones allowed to bring their own weapons.

      On a side note, I realize completely that a civy version of the rifle I would want to purchase is only semi-automatic, but I wouldn't want it for civilian life...

      In all honesty, I can't say what I would want, not want or give any suggestions for... The only webbing I ever wore was "tactical" paintball gear, which fit great even though it was for a bigger guy. I haven't fired any full-auto rifles or any pistol of any kind, so I can't say what would be better, best or anything. I have no idea what kind of pouches, attachments or, well, anything about the gear you receive.

      I'm also not trying to be some Rainbow Six, Counterstrike, COD whackjob who thinks they are going to go around throwing "Tactical Hatchets" at people like all these freaking nutjob YouTubers living in fantasy land. In all honesty, I freaking hate all of the crap I see on YouTube about the "Tactical" crap, tactical this, tactical that... next thing we'll be seeing is friggen tactical toilet paper and tactical tampons for frick sakes...

      So yeah...

      I'll continue reading all of the other threads mariomike posted for me to read... almost finished...
      I've never owned any fire-arms and have only shot a basic .22 rifle and a 12 gauge shotgun.

      Based on my research, when I purchase any fire-arms, they would be:

      My dream rifle: IWI - Tavor or X-95 (have to use myself)
      My dream pistol: Sig Sauer - P226 MK25
      My dream shotgun: Kel-Tek - KSG

      I like my bull-pups. Can't wait to see each in action.

      LightFighter

      • Guest
      Re: General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]
      « Reply #34 on: August 05, 2017, 09:23:07 »
      I'm also not trying to be some Rainbow Six, Counterstrike, COD whackjob who thinks they are going to go around throwing "Tactical Hatchets" at people like all these freaking nutjob YouTubers living in fantasy land. In all honesty, I freaking hate all of the crap I see on YouTube about the "Tactical" crap, tactical this, tactical that... next thing we'll be seeing is friggen tactical toilet paper and tactical tampons for frick sakes...

      You're coming off as that whack job though, wanting to buy your own weapons in case things fail and you can single handedly save everyone.

      No, you can not use your own weapons in the military, issued CF weapons only. Pistols aren't given to everyone. 

      The gear you are issues is yours while you are in, than it gets returned. You can use some of it like the sleeping bag on your own camping trips. However there are better and lighter gear out there to buy for your own use.

      Buying your own gear for military use, again it will vary by unit what is allowed. Also, it isn't restricted to only being green. 

      You've never served, never used our equipment or weapons. Might want to just drop the fantasy of whatever you have about modifying and buying all kinds of gear. If you get in, you will figure out what works or doesn't work for you. As well, you will find out what civilian gear or allowed for use.

      Offline mariomike

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      Re: General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]
      « Reply #35 on: August 05, 2017, 20:10:04 »
      Mariomike and Lightfighter have both at least offered their opinions, expertise, suggestions and help to literally everything I've asked, I thank both of them for that.

      You are welcome. good luck.  :)

      Offline Michael O'Leary

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      Re: General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]
      « Reply #36 on: August 05, 2017, 21:13:55 »
      WFlett,

      I have been watching this thread evolve over the past few days and, to be honest, the recurring thought that comes to mind is a line from the movie Battleship: “Who do I call to teach you humility.”

      You started with a shopping list of desires that only served to illuminate how little time you had spent researching the CAF, on and off this forum, before posting. I can see you've been disabused of some of those, like the need to select either commissioned or non-commissioned service, that Chaplains do not carry weapons, and that personnel within each trade (or “classification” for officers) work and train within the limits of that trade.

      You also have a very high opinion of yourself, your skills and your potential. That's good, there's nothing wrong with self-confidence. The flip side to that is that it needs to be balanced by a similarly high degree of self-discipline. You express a personal need for high energy, high stimulation, and a wide variety of experiences. Unfortunately, the CAF does not always offer that, and certainly doesn't line up experiences like that at the desire of the individual. Even the people who have had very varied careers in the service tend to leave out the number of months they spent back in the training system at every transition point. They also leave out the months or years as the developing individual in their new trade or skill area each time they transitioned.

      If your eventual goal is to be a special operations assaulter, you best bet may be to join as an infantry soldier. That route will, however, include periods of low intensity activities which will not be stimulating or exciting. Someone has to clean the weapons, vehicles, and the vehicle hangar floor. Those jobs too, are infantry soldiers' work (as they are in many trades). Establishing with your chain of command that you desire more than that is good, but demonstrating that you can accept those mundane tasks time after time and do them well is what demonstrates that a soldier is dependable and ready for greater challenges. When limited opportunities for courses, like para, or recce, or patrol pathfinder come along, there will be proven and dependable soldiers ahead of you who have been waiting for those courses and who will get priority, regardless of whether you feel you are better than they are as individuals. Sucking that up is also part of the long slow years of “paying your dues.”

      You may think your assessment of your leadership skills make you a good fit for an officer's commission. But you don't like paperwork. In the military, paperwork is a part of like, for officers from their early days in the military, and for non-commissioned members as soon as they have positions of responsibility (and earlier for some trades like Clerks). That paperwork is essential, and needs to be done right, whether it be planning future training, ordering beans, bullets, and shitters, or writing the justification why one of your soldiers should be considered for a compassionate posting for the benefit of a child's health. Most of that paperwork is also unseen and unrewarded. It's often done after hours when the soldiers have gone home or to bed during training. And it's just as important, and just as much part of being the leader, as saying “Follow me” at the start of an operational mission.

      The CAF has lots of opportunities for exciting training, demanding courses, and challenging postings. But the reality is they don't line up for everyone. For every officer who goes to CSOR, a half-dozen go into instructional posting at schools, running training courses at all levels. Even more find themselves in headquarters across the country, manning a desk day after day for years at a time. It's good to have a dream, but it needs to be balanced with a solid understanding of the reality.

      Before you start that online recruiting application, you need to ask yourself if you're ready to be sitting in a classroom again, for months at a time for regular force courses, learning basics one step at a time along with the wide range of recruits the CAF brings in. There's no accelerated class for you to ask for. There are no short cuts. And the sergeant who tells you he's going to inspect the training platoon at the end of the day on Friday won't care if you have a scheduled wing-suit lesson.

      Are you ready to slow down, suck back, and take the CAF's training at the pace it is delivered. Are you ready to show dedication, perseverance, and commitment to duty for the years it may take before you have a chance to go on one of those high-speed low-drag courses, or to apply to join a special operations unit? Are you ready to head home with a stack of course training files to review and write course assessments on your students on your own time? Are you ready to sit at a headquarters desk processing other units' training requests?

      All of those things are also work challenges that face CAF members every day. And each of them are jobs that need to be done well, each and every day, but they are without the excitement and energy you tell us you thrive on.

      It great to want to a rock star and to seek that opportunity, but the road to that opportunity is long, slow, and fraught with the possibility of missed chances. Frankly, the day to day work, training, and operations of the CAF aren't dependent upon the rock stars. The real need is people who can fit in, maintain stability, and further the interests and goals of the institution one small step at a time. Sometimes, the real rock stars are those who quietly study and identify issues, and solve those problems (some of which may have existed for years before them) without it ever being public knowledge.

      If you're looking to contribute to the CAF, we have a place for you. If you see the CAF as merely a life experience opportunity with lofty goals for the range of things you wish to do, I predict you will be sorely disappointed, and that it will start quickly after joining and build to intolerable levels if you don't control it.

      Good luck with your decision, keep studying and analyzing your options, but also look between the high points and ask yourself how you're going to do when life gets slow in the military, and next week is going to look a lot like last week with no missions on the horizon. Operational missions get a lot of attention, the work done to hold the institution together and be prepared to develop the forces needed for the next mission seldom do.

      Offline PuckChaser

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      Re: General Questions regarding your application [MERGED]
      « Reply #37 on: August 05, 2017, 21:53:53 »
      I'm locking this up. There's nothing further to gain by antagonizing the OP.

      WFlett: Your posts come across as literally every military stereotype, that's why you're getting a hard time. Most of the questions you have are answered here already. You're also in no position to decide who should or shouldn't serve in the CAF until you've actually served yourself, despite all of your civilian qualifications.