Author Topic: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)  (Read 153178 times)

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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2750 on: May 20, 2020, 17:39:50 »
Wonderful….

“Everything looked ready to go, and then the government announced emergency benefits for students and young people. As a result, all but four employees decided to stay home, opting to collect government cheques rather than working all day every day for 50 per cent more pay.”


Chris Day: We are forming new work habits because of the lockdown — and that's going to be a problem

With COVID-19 closures and lockdowns now in their ninth week, an important milestone looms: day 66.

Researchers at University College London found that 66 days is the average time it takes for new behaviours to become automatic or habitual. (Giant grain of salt: this varies with the individual, the activity and the circumstances.) This prompts questions about what habits we are hardwiring into ourselves, given that our daily lives have been upended now for two months and counting.

Roughly 40 per cent of what we do is habitual and, according to Jim Davies, a professor of psychology at Carleton University, forming habits is important for higher-order thinking — i.e., thinking about things other than the immediate task that is occupying us at any given moment. Essentially, habits clear brain space for us to deal with life’s bigger decisions.

So, with lives and routines completely disrupted, how will the habits we are installing now affect how and when we emerge from our current state? Davies doubts anyone knows for sure. And because habits are so individual, it may be impossible for governments and employers to predict precisely how they will factor into the economic recovery on a society-wide scale. Yet with billions of dollars of public money at stake, and our economic health on the line, that’s a major problem. And already there are signs that government aid may be having counterproductive effects.

Take the case of Cleen Detailing, a car care company with operations in Ottawa, Toronto and Vancouver. As its managers were ramping up for the start of their busy season this spring, they went looking to hire dozens of college- and university-aged workers for the summer. Hundreds of candidates applied and dozens were shortlisted. Some even signed contracts. The company invested in extra safety and sanitization protocols to protect them from infection.

Everything looked ready to go, and then the government announced emergency benefits for students and young people. As a result, all but four employees decided to stay home, opting to collect government cheques rather than working all day every day for 50 per cent more pay. The company’s owner, now scrambling to find workers and keep customers, worries that some people’s work ethic is starting to atrophy. He wonders how that will impact his hiring going forward — especially if wage replacements are extended beyond June.

If welfare-over-work becomes habit, how tough will that instinct be to break? If the car detailer’s experience is shared more broadly, will it put a stop to talk about schemes like a universal basic income? Looked at another way, how might work be valued and rewarded after the pandemic?

Some employers are already giving cues. Twitter recently told its employees that they might be able to work from home indefinitely. Other companies are providing their employees with more flexible schedules and other supports to account for new realities and employee demands. And still others, such as many grocers, have increased wages to compensate workers for heightened risks. Expect those costs to appear on future grocery bills, if they haven’t already.

What cues are governments sending? Most provinces are being tentative in their reopening and relaunch plans, despite emptying coffers and ballooning deficits. As for the federal government, all signs so far indicate that the taps will stay open and public dollars will continue to flow for as long as it takes. But that is neither sustainable, nor perhaps advisable, as those bills will come due, as well.

Yet even while the pandemic programs are still in place, there will be a need for governments at all levels to tweak or overhaul them, since most of them were rolled out at lightning speed at the start of this crisis. And in order to do this effectively, governments need information.
Some stats — like rates of substance and spousal abuse, suicides and other collateral damage that has resulted from the lockdowns — are fairly easy to obtain. But others are inherently individual and tougher to quantify, so how will governments and corporations make decisions accordingly? What role will legislators play in assessing whether programs are working as intended or not? How will companies incentivize people to return to full productivity?

The habits we are learning now will influence how and when we are ready to go back into the world. If leaders are thinking deeply about that, most aren’t talking about it. It may be that they simply don’t have answers, but with health restrictions remaining in place for the foreseeable future and debt clocks spiralling ever upward, time may be a luxury in the search for solutions.

With habits becoming more ingrained by the day, any potential corrections may get tougher and less politically palatable — but also more urgent. And from a public policy perspective, that should be focusing minds across the land.

https://vancouversun.com/opinion/chris-day-on-covid-19-we-are-forming-new-work-habits-because-of-the-lockdown-and-thats-going-to-be-a-problem/wcm/93235e4a-9898-441a-a819-0a470d48e263/
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Offline BeyondTheNow

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2751 on: May 20, 2020, 18:00:06 »
Our Regimental march dates back to the Riel Rebellion. The words are Pork Beans and Hardtack ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iboG6b3ewA ) Curiously, The University of Utah Fight Song.

The Regimental Band has put together a COVID 19 hand-washing video.  Please watch and if you have any comments, please send to the Bandmaster, Captain Ryan Wehrle at ryanwehrle@hotmail.com

https://youtu.be/6v3Emq3dWc4

It’s on the brigade, unit and band Facebook pages as well. Enjoy a laugh at my expense.

Proud of our Regimental Band for their work on this!

DMus

That’s terrific, I bet they had a lot of fun putting that together. Thanks for sharing!
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Offline Blackadder1916

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2752 on: May 20, 2020, 19:35:29 »

The Regimental Band has put together a COVID 19 hand-washing video.  . . .

Good fun, but having to learn a new tune and lyrics would take too long.  I've long stopped using Happy Birthday as a timing device.  Even before the pandemic, my song of choice was "North Atlantic Squadron"; the chorus, a verse and a chorus comes out about 23 seconds.  It is much more entertaining and probably most in uniform (at least from my generation) already know the tune.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2fJ6zmKFeY
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Offline Navy_Pete

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2753 on: May 20, 2020, 20:07:24 »
Okay, so quick math; student benefit is $1250 a month. If he's paying 50% more then that, that's $1875 a month. At min wage, he's talking about scheduling people for about 30 hours a week.  After taxes, they would probably pocket $4k for the summer, and just tuition is $6-8k.

At the current min wage, working 160 hours in a month, you are looking at $2240/month. Bear in mind that you get a few 31 day months, plus good chance of holiday pay, OT etc. If you do landscaping or similar, it's really easy to do 60 hours or more a week if the weather cooperates, and lots of other jobs have opportunities to pick up extra shifts and get more hours.

 If he's having a hard time finding students, it's not because they are lazy, it's because they are smart enough to find another job where they can make enough to pay tuition. Even if you have zero living expenses during the summer, after taxes, he's not paying enough to pay for tuition for a year (let alone books and all the other expenses you run into).

So F*&^ this guy for making it a generational thing when he is trying to take advantage of students as cheap disposable labour and having a hard time finding people. Schedule/pay people enough hours so they can afford to live and maybe you'll have more success.

There are a lot of students pretty panicked about being able to go to school next year; in my experience as a current PGT, they are smarter and harder working then I was 20 years ago, with a lot more competition. This is turning into a pretty nasty bow wave with some of the changes to the student loan programs in Ontario, so expect to see enrollment drop significantly next year. Taking a gap year to work isn't a bad thing, but the stereotypes of Gen Z are way off point from the type of people that are plugging away in post secondary from what I can tell.

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2754 on: May 20, 2020, 20:53:16 »
The 50% figure wasn't in quotations, so that's the author's figure. Indeed has Cleen Detailing paying $18 per hour, so just under $3000 before taxes and deductions. That's a reasonable wage for unskilled seasonal labour.

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2755 on: May 21, 2020, 01:03:29 »
Global report: don't count on vaccine, US scientist warns, as cases near 5 million

Brazil reports nearly 20,000 infections in one day; Trump says he’ll stop taking hydroxychloroquine in two days; Lufthansa in rescue talks

A top US scientist has said governments should not count on a Covid-19 vaccine being developed any time soon, as global infections were set to pass 5 million after surges in Latin America, including Brazil, which has recorded nearly 20,000 new cases.

William Haseltine, the groundbreaking cancer, HIV/AIDS and human genome projects researcher, has said the best approach to the pandemic is to manage the disease through careful tracing of infections and strict isolation measures whenever it starts spreading.

He said that while a vaccine could be developed, “I wouldn’t count on it”, and urged people to wear masks, wash hands, clean surfaces and keep a distance. Vaccines developed previously for other types of coronavirus had failed to protect mucous membranes in the nose where the virus typically enters the body, he said.

The United States and other countries has not done enough to “forcibly isolate” people exposed to the virus, Haseltine said, but praised China, South Korea and Taiwan’s efforts to curb infections.

Haseltine said the US, Russia and Brazil – which rank first, second and third for infections – have done the worst.

As global infections neared 5 million, Brazil reported a record 19,951 cases on Wednesday, according to the ministry of health, taking total infections to 291,579. If the trend continues, the country would shortly overtake Russia’s cases (308,705).

Brazil’s health ministry, meanwhile issued new guidelines for the wider use of anti-malarial drugs in mild coronavirus cases, a treatment touted by President Jair Bolsonaro in defiance of public health experts warning of possible health risks.

The interim health minister, Eduardo Pazuello, an army general, authorised the use after two doctors left the ministry’s top job under pressure to promote early use of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine.

The new guidelines suggest dosage for the anti-malarials along with the antibiotic azithromycin at the onset of symptoms. Patients or family members will have to sign a waiver recognising potential side effects.

President Trump has said his hydroxycholoquine regimen, which goes against the advice of the US Food and Drug Administration, would end in two days. Trump also said if New York and New Jersey were not included in the US Covid-19 numbers, the country would be “just about in a class by ourselves”. He strongly criticised China’s reported coronavirus figures, saying: “they gave numbers that were so low … I saw more problem on television than they were reporting, just by looking at a picture.”


https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/21/global-report-coronavirus-vaccine-us-scientist-cases-5-million
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline OceanBonfire

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2756 on: May 21, 2020, 15:35:22 »
Quote
28 CAF members sent to Quebec, Ontario care homes diagnosed with COVID-19

The Canadian Armed Forces is reporting a dramatic increase in the number of military personnel who have contracted COVID-19 while working in long-term care facilities in Ontario and Quebec.

A total of 28 service members deployed in such facilities have tested positive for the respiratory illness, the military said in a statement Thursday. That compared with only five who had been found to have caught COVID-19 last week.

Military officials had previously indicated they were only to provide such updated numbers every two weeks. The Armed Forces now says it will publish a daily update, suggesting it expects more cases as service members continue to work in long-term care homes.

...


https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/twenty-eight-soldiers-test-positive-for-covid-19-after-working-in-care-homes-1.4948771

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/pandemic-covid-coronavirus-canadian-forces-long-term-care-1.5578948

https://globalnews.ca/news/6969802/coronavirus-armed-forces-care-homes/
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Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2757 on: May 21, 2020, 17:15:23 »
Quote
28 CAF members sent to Quebec, Ontario care homes diagnosed with COVID-19

The Canadian Armed Forces is reporting a dramatic increase in the number of military personnel who have contracted COVID-19 while working in long-term care facilities in Ontario and Quebec.

Didn't the CDS say we weren't going to report numbers on our members getting covid?
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Offline Quirky

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2758 on: May 21, 2020, 19:52:10 »
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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2759 on: May 22, 2020, 01:53:35 »
Didn't the CDS say we weren't going to report numbers on our members getting covid?

That's only in China :)
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline Colin P

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Offline Rifleman62

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2761 on: May 22, 2020, 12:00:59 »
Quote
28 CAF members sent to Quebec, Ontario care homes diagnosed with COVID-19

Good luck with VAC. They will probably need a letter signed by the Surgeon General stating COVID-19 wholly resulted from military service and even that letter will not be enough proof for the various Adjudicators.
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Offline Ralph

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2762 on: May 22, 2020, 13:07:22 »
28x CF 98 and DND 663s to be staffed. Supervisors, sharpen your pencils!

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2763 on: May 22, 2020, 14:37:57 »
28x CF 98 and DND 663s to be staffed, so far. Supervisors, sharpen your pencils!

There, FTFY.
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline Rifleman62

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2764 on: May 22, 2020, 15:58:22 »
" Somebody" with authority should have staffed a template of the CF98 and DND 663 quoting the CF OpO authority, for the CF pers who get infected. Run it by VAC to ensure it meets their requirements, brief VAC staff that these docs are approved. All the on site units would have to do would be to add victim and witness particulars, dates, loc, possibly some supporting detail, etc.
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Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2765 on: May 22, 2020, 16:02:03 »
We can't prove they didn't have Covid before going into the long term care facilities - probably VAC
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Offline MilEME09

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2766 on: May 22, 2020, 16:07:07 »
We can't prove they didn't have Covid before going into the long term care facilities - probably VAC

Except likely they were under orders to work from home leading up to it.
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Offline Remius

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2767 on: May 22, 2020, 16:09:56 »
Except likely they were under orders to work from home leading up to it.

Assuming they followed said orders.
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Offline Rifleman62

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2768 on: May 22, 2020, 16:12:30 »
Exactly. The reason for a DND/VAC approved documents prior to submission. It also takes the stress off the victim or the C oC if there is a fatality.

I thought everyone was quarantine for 2 weeks prior to deployment? Understand you could be clear one day, infected the next. Another reason to cut VAC off at the knees.

Leading Change?
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Offline CanadianTire

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2769 on: May 22, 2020, 16:16:01 »
Yes, they were quarantined for two weeks prior to deployment. That seems to be a CAF-wide requirement.
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Offline Chief Engineer

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2770 on: May 22, 2020, 18:14:36 »


Trudeau says question of hazard pay for military in care homes remains undecided

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the question of whether military members serving in long-term care homes hit by the coronavirus pandemic remains under consideration.

But he gave no indication of whether any decision has been made.

“These are discussions that are ongoing within the military,” Trudeau said when asked during a daily press briefing whether those deployed to the hard-hit care homes in Ontario and Quebec should earn more money.

“We need to thank the women and men of the armed Forces for stepping up yet again, whenever they are called on to go into difficult or risky situations to do the work of protecting Canadians. This is what they are doing, we thank them and we salute them.”

The number of Canadian Forces members deployed to long-term care homes who have contracted COVID-19 has risen rapidly over the past week.

A total of 28 have been diagnosed as of Thursday.

That compares to just five who were found to have tested positive last week.

https://globalnews.ca/news/6973811/coronavirus-canadian-military-care-homes/?fbclid=IwAR2q2qn03p3IZkWULw7_kWh31HJMvFRP04GKEo-ye4izcC3yQnUY_j1PkwY


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Offline stellarpanther

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2771 on: May 22, 2020, 19:45:23 »
Yes, they were quarantined for two weeks prior to deployment. That seems to be a CAF-wide requirement.

A lot of the people doing GD type work are the ones who were quarantining in Borden however, most of the medics were taken from the various base MIR's some were working right up to a few days before getting deployed. 

Offline stellarpanther

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2772 on: May 22, 2020, 20:06:30 »
Today's letter from the CDS, amongst other topics it states that they will soon be restarting training but only vaguely mentions returning to work,  has anyone heard more people returning to the office or is that something that will be a while still and we will continue to work from home?

https://twitter.com/cds_canada_cemd?lang=en





Online kkwd

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2773 on: May 22, 2020, 20:32:21 »
The latest from Dr Fauci

https://www.businessinsider.com/anthony-fauci-irreparable-damage-stay-at-home-too-long-2020-5

Quote
Anthony Fauci warns of 'irreparable damage' if lockdowns are kept in place for too long

Quote
"We can't stay locked down for such a considerable period of time that you might do irreparable damage and have unintended consequences, including consequences for health," Fauci said in a CNBC interview.
An opinion based on facts? What is that? An opinion is an opinion.

Offline Remius

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Re: All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)
« Reply #2774 on: May 22, 2020, 20:34:31 »
He’s not wrong.

But I am concerned here at least that measures haven’t been properly implemented.

Tracing, testing etc.
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