Author Topic: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)  (Read 1695164 times)

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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4500 on: October 29, 2019, 18:25:54 »
Simple economics really, the more orders for the aircraft, the lower the cost. Whats cheaper ordering 10 or order 100 ?

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4501 on: November 08, 2019, 10:13:02 »
Norway has their new fighter in operation way before RCAF will:
Quote
Norway reaches IOC milestone with F-35

Norway has declared initial operating capability (IOC) status for its Lockheed Martin F-35As, with the milestone having been reached on 6 November.

The achievement followed a deployment to Rygge air station to check that the aircraft could be successfully operated away from its home base of Orland.

Norway is third European country after Italy and the UK to reach the IOC milestone.

Oslo has conducted two years of test and evaluation activities with its F-35s, including a focus on the fighter’s cold-weather capabilities
[emphasis added].

Since receiving its first three examples of the fighter in November 2017, the Royal Norwegian Air Force’s fleet has grown to 22 aircraft. Of these, seven are stationed at Luke AFB in the USA as part of a multi-national training component.

Next year, Norway will deploy its F-35s to Iceland to conduct NATO air-policing missions. By 2022, the country will perform quick reaction alert missions with the fighters from Evenes air base in the north of the country [emphasis added].
https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/norway-reaches-ioc-milestone-with-f-35-462072/

Mark
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Offline dapaterson

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4502 on: November 08, 2019, 10:43:17 »
Does IOC for Norway include any weapons testing?  It sometimes seems that the quest for "good news" stories (We've reached IOC!) means we overlook basic things like the ability of a military aircraft to do military things.

If all IOC for a fighter requires is an ability to operate in cold weather, and operate in an austere deployed location, then we can buy some new Twin Otters to get that IOC...
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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4503 on: November 08, 2019, 12:38:01 »
Does IOC for Norway include any weapons testing?  It sometimes seems that the quest for "good news" stories (We've reached IOC!) means we overlook basic things like the ability of a military aircraft to do military things.

If all IOC for a fighter requires is an ability to operate in cold weather, and operate in an austere deployed location, then we can buy some new Twin Otters to get that IOC...

Unless Norway is buying a F-35 that they're building themselves from the ground up (they're not, same production line as USAF A/C), I think they're good considering F-35s are dropping JDAMs in Iraq from April 2019 until presumably the present. https://www.defensenews.com/air/2019/04/30/us-air-force-conducts-airstrikes-with-f-35-for-first-time-ever/

Don't tempt the Liberal government with Twin Otters. If they can get Bombardier to build them and squeak through NORAD capability requirements, that's what we'll get.

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4504 on: November 08, 2019, 14:15:51 »
Hell, this gov't (and the previous one) wouldn't even get new CC-138 Twotters for 440 Squadron, Yellowknife (http://www.rcaf-arc.forces.gc.ca/en/squadron/440-squadron.page)--planes now 48 years old. Post from 2015, guess who bought these new Twotters:

Quote
Why Not Just Buy New-Build Viking Air Twotters for RCAF?


https://mark3ds.wordpress.com/2015/03/26/mark-collins-why-not-just-buy-new-build-viking-air-twotters-for-rcaf/

Mark
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Offline Spencer100

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4505 on: November 08, 2019, 18:26:35 »
Unless Norway is buying a F-35 that they're building themselves from the ground up (they're not, same production line as USAF A/C), I think they're good considering F-35s are dropping JDAMs in Iraq from April 2019 until presumably the present. https://www.defensenews.com/air/2019/04/30/us-air-force-conducts-airstrikes-with-f-35-for-first-time-ever/

Don't tempt the Liberal government with Twin Otters. If they can get Bombardier to build them and squeak through NORAD capability requirements, that's what we'll get.

Twin Otters are built by Viking now and manufactured out west in Alberta. So no Trudeau doesn't care to buy them.
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4506 on: November 09, 2019, 14:41:30 »
That failure to communicate:
Quote
In First, Air Force Will Send Secure Data Between an F-22 and F-35

The U.S. Air Force will soon test out a gateway that could finally allow the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter and F-22 Raptor to share data during missions without compromising the fighters' stealth, a service official said Thursday.

It would be the first time the Air Force will test how the two highly capable fifth-generation fighters can exchange battlespace information after years of incompatibility, said Preston Dunlap, the Air Force's chief architect serving the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics.

"From zero to 60 in four months, [the goal] is to design and integrate the gateway so we can have something to triangulate" the information, Dunlap said during the DefenseOne Outlook event in Washington, D.C. The testing is set to begin in December, he said.

Dunlap said the two aircraft were built with different communications standards in mind.

Because the F-22 was built with a datalink -- Intra-Flight Data Link, or IFDL -- system that is incompatible with the F-35's Multi-Function Advanced Datalink system, or MADL, it can receive data from the F-35 and fourth-generation fighters through its legacy Link 16 system, but cannot share data back. Link 16 is the standard U.S. and NATO operating system.

"That's both the physics, like frequency, and software, like a radio and what's behind that actual antenna," Dunlap said. "So for the first time, we want to be able to share data as we would like to in a relevant time and environment -- and we want to operate in a highly contested environment -- and ensure it gets [securely] from one place to the other."

The technology is "something that can translate from that way not only one platform talks, [like] the language, but also has to cross over the frequencies," he added.

In 2013, Lockheed Martin demonstrated linking the F-22 and F-35 avia a Link 16 capability in what the company called "Project Missouri." But the process never became standard-use.

In line with Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein's vision for the service, the effort also supports the Defense Department's goal to connect and share between platforms and streamline and centralize the information.

"We want to move quick, and we want to show it can be done, and we want to push ourselves to continue to enhance capability," Dunlap said, adding officials will share progress reports with the Army and Navy.

Speaking to reporters after his panel speech, the chief architect said the experiment will bring in a range of Air Force units, with operations taking place in widely separated geographic locations.

Earlier this year, the F-35 connected and shared information between a U-2 Dragon Lady reconnaissance aircraft and a ground control facility operated by the Missile Defense Agency, according to Lockheed Martin Corp., which ran the test.

"During the demonstration, called 'Project Riot,' an F-35 detected a long-range missile launch with its onboard sensors and shared the information through the U-2 to the air defense commander on the ground, enabling the commander to quickly make the decision to target the threat [emphasis added]," Lockheed officials said in a September news release.

"This next-level connectivity reduces the data-to-decision timeline from minutes to seconds, which is critical in fighting today's adversaries and advanced threats," it stated.
https://www.military.com/daily-news/2019/11/08/first-air-force-will-send-secure-data-between-f-22-and-f-35.html

Mark
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4507 on: November 09, 2019, 14:45:49 »
This capability I think is a game changer.

Offline SupersonicMax

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4508 on: November 09, 2019, 16:42:25 »
Link between aircraft is nothing new.  The fact they couldn’t talk from the beginning is a travesty.

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4509 on: November 09, 2019, 23:32:52 »
Link between aircraft is nothing new.  The fact they couldn’t talk from the beginning is a travesty.

Travesty is a bit dramatic.  Compatibility wasn’t in the Raptor’s original CONOP, because MADL hadn’t been developed yet. 

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4510 on: November 10, 2019, 12:26:57 »
USAF F-35As for Eielson--note they are for Pacific, do not (for time being at least) have NORAD mission. That remains with F-22s at Elmendorf (and might some F-15EXs go to Alaska for NORAD?):

Quote
The first F-35 jet is being tested at Eielson Air Force Base. The Fairbanks area is preparing for a population jump.

 The first F-35A Lightning II fighter jet has landed at Eielson Air Force Base and will spend much of November going through testing to ensure it can operate on an icy runway in frigid Interior Alaska.

“They‘re going 150 miles per hour down the runway, hitting the patch of ice and making sure they can still keep it under control,” said 2nd Lt. Kitsana Dounglomchan, a public affairs officer on the base southeast of Fairbanks.

The F-35 arrived at Eielson last month. It‘s the  to bring 54 of the new F-35 stealth fighters to Eielson. The F-35 is the military‘s most advanced jet yet, and also its most expensive.

Eielson‘s batch of the radar-evading planes will start arriving in April 2020. With them will come about 3,500 people, including airmen, contractors and family members, most of whom are expected to settle in nearby North Pole, said Kevin Blanchard, who directs the 354th Fighter Wing‘s F-35 Program Integration Office at Eielson.

Blanchard said he expects the first wave of new military personnel to arrive at the base between October 2018 and September 2019, followed by even larger groups in 2020 and 2021.

He said the F-35 program will increase the number of military personnel at Eielson by about 50 percent, a significant change for a base once on the brink of closure...

 At Eielson, about $550 million will be spent on construction and renovation projects for the F-35 program, according to Blanchard. The projects include renovating airmen‘s dormitories and building a new child care center. There will also be a new building to house a flight simulator and a new maintenance hangar [emphasis added, Cold Lake and Bagotville?].

“We‘re in constant planning mode right now,” he said...

 At Eielson over the next few weeks, the military will continue to test the F-35‘s ability to maneuver on an icy runway and taxiway, which does not yet include it taking flight, Dounglomchan said.

Eielson is also testing a drag chute, requested by Norway, that would help the F-35 land on a short runway with high crosswinds [emphasis added], said Lt. Col. Tucker Hamilton, commander of the 461st Flight Test Squadron at Edwards Air Force Base in California.

Dounglomchan said the F-35 will head back to the California base on Nov. 20.

In January, five F-35 fighters will arrive in Eielson for more robust testing, including flights.
https://stockdailydish.com/the-first-f-35-jet-is-being-tested-at-eielson-air-force-base-the-fairbanks-area-is-preparing-for-a-population-jump/

Mark
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Offline LoboCanada

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4511 on: Today at 09:42:53 »
Australia's F-35s: Lessons from A Problematic Purchase

Quote
In a startling statement reported this month, two recent Air Force chiefs assert Australia has made some grave force structure errors. It seems the RAAF needs a new bomber, as the new F-35 Joint Strike Fighter now entering service is inadequate for future strike operations. The chiefs’ intervention raises questions about how this could have happened and, given growing international tensions, how such expensive strategic missteps can be avoided.

The first two F-35s finally arrived in Australia in late 2018, with the last nine planned for mid-2023. These nine are expected to be the Lot 15 Block 4 version, the fully developed standard broadly envisaged back in 2002. The rest, comprising six different interim-build standards, will then be progressively modernised to this definitive configuration.

The Lot 15 aircraft has significant hardware and software changes so the complete maintenance and support system, simulators and training centres will also need modernising. This will take time and additional money, but there is no choice. If not modernised, the earlier F-35s – almost all the RAAF’s brand-new fleet – will become hard to maintain or software update, and gradually operationally deficient.


https://www.lowyinstitute.org/the-interpreter/australia-s-f-35s-lessons-from-problematic-purchase