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ADHD, ADD, and why we can't get in rants......

kadrury

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Unfortunatley I totally disagree. I am a military member with ADHD. I am an adult. My docotr sees high number of adult military members a week that have adhd. It is not a true statment to say that adhd rarely persists into adult. Actually it is the exact opposite.
 

ModlrMike

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kadrury said:
Unfortunately I totally disagree. I am a military member with ADHD. I am an adult. My doctor sees high number of adult military members a week that have adhd. It is not a true statement to say that adhd rarely persists into adult. Actually it is the exact opposite.
ADHD is a "spectrum" disorder with a wide left and right of arc. Those folks like yourself are likely at the lesser end of the spectrum and are therefore fit to serve. Besides, each case is judged on its own circumstances. Just because one person has some disorder and is allowed to serve, doesn't mean all are.
 

Armymedic

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Kadrury,
You are correct, the condition persists (60% continue through adulthood).

My error.

 

kadrury

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Quote: ADHD is a "spectrum" disorder with a wide left and right of arc. Those folks like yourself are likely at the lesser end of the spectrum and are therefore fit to serve. Besides, each case is judged on its own circumstances. Just because one person has some disorder and is allowed to serve, doesn't mean all are.


As I said before many adults in the forces have ADHD. Most of us, the ones that I know, were diagnosed after enrolling. And the few that was diagnosed prior to enrolling have had no issues. According to the base surgeon on the base I serve at, someone can not be released due to the fact that they adhd. They can't even be released because they take medication.

I bet you put 20 guys in a room and at least 55-60% of them have adhd. You could be working with your best friend and you would never know.

In my opinion the military is the best job for someone with adhd. And if anyone tells me diffrent, you can come talk to me.
 

gcclarke

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kadrury said:
Quote: ADHD is a "spectrum" disorder with a wide left and right of arc. Those folks like yourself are likely at the lesser end of the spectrum and are therefore fit to serve. Besides, each case is judged on its own circumstances. Just because one person has some disorder and is allowed to serve, doesn't mean all are.


As I said before many adults in the forces have ADHD. Most of us, the ones that I know, were diagnosed after enrolling. And the few that was diagnosed prior to enrolling have had no issues. According to the base surgeon on the base I serve at, someone can not be released due to the fact that they adhd. They can't even be released because they take medication.

I bet you put 20 guys in a room and at least 55-60% of them have adhd. You could be working with your best friend and you would never know.

In my opinion the military is the best job for someone with adhd. And if anyone tells me diffrent, you can come talk to me.

Really? Because while I don't have access to the full text, wikipedia cites this study stating that it is estimated that a mere 4.6% of American adults are living with ADHD.

As for the "someone cannot be released due to the fact that they have ADHD quote, I would imagine that would very much so depend upon the severity of the disorder. Should someone with mild ADHD manage to get in, and it for some reason becomes much more severe, to the point where it impacts your ability to do your job well, I very much so doubt that there would be anything preventing them from being given a medical release.
 

medicineman

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The operative word is "tries" - just like any spectrum of disease, there can come a time that, despite medication and therapy, you become a liability, and when that happens, we have start showing/nudging/shoving people to the door.  No they can't kick you out for having ADHD in or of itself - however, if you start having behavioural issues that become administrative or disciplinary problems or your follow up requirements become too onerous, you could be released under administratrive, disciplinary or medical articles.  And yeah, I do know people in the service with ADHD, and I've also seen the results of letting people in with it that, despite medication, shouldn't have been enrolled.

MM
 

kadrury

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So your telling me, even if those people were on medication they shouldnt be enrolled. These posts jusst prove how very little all of you know about adhd. Everyone seems to look at it like its the black plague but little do you all know there is so many pluses to having it. But hey who I am to tell anyone how to think. I am just advocating for the service members who have adhd and are learning how to balance the illness and their everyday lives.
 

George Wallace

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kadrury said:
So your telling me, even if those people were on medication they shouldnt be enrolled. These posts jusst prove how very little all of you know about adhd. Everyone seems to look at it like its the black plague but little do you all know there is so many pluses to having it. But hey who I am to tell anyone how to think. I am just advocating for the service members who have adhd and are learning how to balance the illness and their everyday lives.

Just clarify for me one more time; who are you advocating for?

    a.  People trying to enroll in the CF; or

    b.  People who are currently Serving Members.
 

gcclarke

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kadrury said:
So your telling me, even if those people were on medication they shouldnt be enrolled. These posts jusst prove how very little all of you know about adhd. Everyone seems to look at it like its the black plague but little do you all know there is so many pluses to having it. But hey who I am to tell anyone how to think. I am just advocating for the service members who have adhd and are learning how to balance the illness and their everyday lives.

Well… if someone requires medication in order to be able to function well enough to do their job, then no they should not be enrolled. Because, as mentioned before, what happens when you're deployed and run out? If someone's condition is mild enough that they can still manage, without medication, to function in an acceptable manner, then I don't see it as a problem. And if they then use medication to improve their condition even further, all the better for them.

You're advocating for service members who have ADHD, and that's all well and good. I'm advocating for the service, who must ensure that when the sticky brown stuff hits the fan, every single CF member must be able to react accordingly, whether they're on their meds or not.

So yes, a prospective enrolee should be required to demonstrate that they are capable of performing whatever duties they may be assigned without the aid of medication. This is obviously a non-issue for people who were diagnosed with ADHD after they enrolled, such as yourself, as they were obviously able to prove they were sufficiently medically fit without the aid of medication for a disease they didn't know they had.
 

mariomike

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kadrury said:
In my opinion the military is the best job for someone with adhd.

I'll take your word for it. But, may I ask, why is that?

FYI, if interested:
http://www.cfgb-cgfc.gc.ca/English/2007-026.html
 

kadrury

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Because of the discipline, organization, and standards required by all CF members. It is these things that help service members with adhd. Keeps them on a path and aroutine required by them.
 

mariomike

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kadrury said:
Because of the discipline, organization, and standards required by all CF members. It is these things that help service members with adhd. Keeps them on a path and aroutine required by them.

I have always considered the CF to be a great full or part-time career for anyone, for the reasons you mention.
Thank-you for giving me your personal perspective. 
 

medicineman

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kadrury said:
So your telling me, even if those people were on medication they shouldnt be enrolled. These posts jusst prove how very little all of you know about adhd. Everyone seems to look at it like its the black plague but little do you all know there is so many pluses to having it. But hey who I am to tell anyone how to think. I am just advocating for the service members who have adhd and are learning how to balance the illness and their everyday lives.

Number 1: I have to advocate for the WHOLE CF when I do enrollment or other medicals - full stop.  As gc stated, if you cannot function to a high degree without the benefit of medication or require frequent follow up, you won't be enrolled.  If we find you to have it later on in life, we'll do our best to help you manage it, but if you fall into that group that doesn't respond well to treatment, then like other problems, we have to consider what's best for the CF and start the medical ball rolling.

Number 2:  While you and others may in fact be quite high functioning, and many are, for every one of you, there are others that have poor impulse control, little attention span or attention to details required in this job despite treatment.  ADHD is a spectrum and there are many people within that spectrum that shouldn't be doing this job.  They become discipline problems and or administrative burdens that take for ever and a day to get rid of.  While the discipline and routine may work for some, there are others I've had to deal with over the years that had no business being in the military.  That's why if they're identified as having ahd a diagnosis of ADHD/ADD an assessment from the treating clinician is required - I've seen many turned off by the RMO because of the things I've already mentioned.

BTW -  It's nice that you want to advocate for your peeps, but the CF isn't here to cater to every special interest group there is out there - as our sand box is small, we're a little particular about who gets to play in it.

MM
 

Armymedic

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kadrury said:
Because of the discipline, organization, and standards required by all CF members. It is these things that help service members with adhd. Keeps them on a path and aroutine required by them.

And what happens to the person when the world goes to shit, (as it so often seems to do, especially on operations) and said person can not cope with the constant changes, stresses and needs for improvisation?

I have a little card here that says: "Recipe for Disaster".
 

garneau26

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Hi,
I know there are quite a few posts about ADD here, they mostly all say that you need to get a letter from your doctor saying that you no longer need medication, one post said he needed to be off-med for 6 weeks, another said it was 3 weeks for him and another one for 6 months, not sure about those but anyways, I'd like to know more about the time you have to be off-medication, any personnal stories would be really appreciated
Thanks
 

the 48th regulator

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Alrighty Folks this is......

What?  What?!?  I have no time for this I am out of here, you guys bore me.

garneau26, you try the recruiter yet?  I hear he has some neat info, that can help.  I think.

dileas

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