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ADHD, ADD, and why we can't get in rants......

HaZarD SFD

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I have had ADHD from the age of 11.  Took medication till I was 17.  In the past 3 years (I am 32 now)  I have retaken medication to see if it helped with my sleeping and attitude. (Maybe 3-4months of medication over 3 years)

I was denied due to taking medication from 2000 till Jan 2015.  I think they just misread the information that was given. 

I took the denial letter to the doctors as per the Medical Officers suggestion.  My doctor seen the letter and clarified the situation medically and physically.  Stating I was only on medication temporarily and that I do not require doctor visits.  I maybe see her 1-2 times a year but 80% of the time its because I am actually sick.

I have been basically off it for 15 years and have achieved graduating with honors from alqonquin college and currently working in a machine shop producing Fracture Critical aircraft components.

I have been off the medication 100% since January and have submitted my letter and hope for a review of it and I will see what happens from there.

***

I was told my medical will stop my file from ERC if it does not pass.  However it was denied after ERC and the Recruiting officer had no idea of that.  I also tried contacting him 30 days prior leaving 3-4 messages and it took him a month to even call back after getting my papers back from ERC.
 

SupersonicMax

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ADHD...  I am convinced most of my colleagues, including myself, have it (or at least some degree of it).  We were just "lucky" our parents didn't take the easier route of medication...  For me, my parents kept me in sports and extra-curricular activities which made me more manageable (or so she says).  I have never been diagnosed although reading and signs and symptoms make me think of how I am.  I also believe some of those traits helped me get where I am.

It may just be me, but I find pills is the easy solution nowadays for a little more active kids...  Once they are on it, you severely reduce their life options....
 

estoguy

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SupersonicMax said:
ADHD...  I am convinced most of my colleagues, including myself, have it (or at least some degree of it).  We were just "lucky" our parents didn't take the easier route of medication...  For me, my parents kept me in sports and extra-curricular activities which made me more manageable (or so she says).  I have never been diagnosed although reading and signs and symptoms make me think of how I am.  I also believe some of those traits helped me get where I am.

It may just be me, but I find pills is the easy solution nowadays for a little more active kids...  Once they are on it, you severely reduce their life options....

Hey Max,

Totally agree with you. I had a prof at Queens in education who had a theory that ADHD was not actually a problem, but a modification in brain development.  In multitasking situations, she'd been involved in studies that found that people with ADHD worked better, as they seemed to have the ability to better track information, etc from multiple sources better.

I really discussed the issue with my family doctor in my late teens, as I believed it was an issue for me.  He felt based on our conversation that I did as well.  I never did any formal testing and we did discuss the medication angle.  He felt that at the age i was at (I was around 18 at the time), he felt the medication wouldn't do much, and considering my marks were OK in school and that I'd basically dealt with it my whole life, that I'd be fine.

In my case, I really had to get my time management down and avoid distractions.  I've made it through public school, high school, college and university with very minimal support.  Most of how I dealth with it, I did on my own.  I found information on my own and applied it.

I too believe that the medication route is an easy way out, and really does have limiting effects later in life.  I truly believe that in many instances, ADHD can be managed in other ways. People just aren't willing to do the work.
 

MikeyBoy

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Hello,

I am a student in Ontario who will be going to grade 12 in September and I want to apply and go to Wilfred Laurier University once I graduate. I'll be applying for a military history program and after graduate I plan on going to officer school in the military.

However, I learned that I can apply to join the military and have my school paid for while having to serve 2 months for every month the Army pays for after graduation. This sounds perfect to me, it aligns with my goals after graduation and it would make University less of a financial burden on me and my family. However, I have ADHD and have been taking Adderall while in school to help me do my work and retain information, I noticed that after I started taking the medication in grade 11, my grades went from 60s and 70s in academic classes in grade 9 & 10 to low 80s in university classes. I know the medication helps me a lot in a school environment, and I have been worrying that I won't be able to take my medication while I am in university if I join the payed university program.

I've done research and know that I won't be able to take any medication while I'm serving and I'm perfectly fine with that, taking the medication only during school is my main goal as I learn faster and more effectively with it.

To sum it up, my question is: If I joined the payed university program, would I be able to take ADHD medications such as Adderall whilst I am in university?

Thank you

 

GreysM

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Hello everyone,

I know ADD/ADHD have been brought up in the past, but I haven't been able to find anything on having a misdiagnose of ADD on record.
I found myself having trouble during my first year in University, and at this time my wife's health went downhill quickly after a new condition was misdiagnosed and she was prescribed the wrong meds, and we had multiple deaths in the family. I seen a doctor in January of this year, who diagnosed me with ADD(I was having trouble focusing in class and on tests). After a short time I started having a reaction to the medicine, and stopped taking it. There was no noticeable change afterwards, and I saw my doctor recently after completing summer courses without any medication, and he believed he had misdiagnosed me and that it was just from going through a stressful period, and possibly from being back in an education setting(I graduated in 2008) after so many years.

I plan to apply for the reserves soon, while I'm in still in school full time. I know I'll find out more when I talk to the recruiter(still training for BMQ) and I'm wondering if this may be an issue? My marks are not the greatest, but they are consistent.

Thank you for your time.
 

PuckChaser

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It's been covered ad nauseum here before. Fully disclose during your medical, expect to have to obtain a doctor's note and have him/her fill out a form describing the misdiagnosis. Submit and expect to wait a while as the CFRG MOs review your file. You may or may not get a favourable decision from them.
 

vancouver12

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Can someone with ADHD apply to join? Also if you are on ADHD medication will that disqualify you? If you are able to prove that you can operate without taking the medication, how does that process work?

Thank you for looking into this.
 

BinRat55

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Personal experience ONLY - not to be taken as gospel...

My son was diagnosed with severe ADHD at age 6. On ritalin for 12 years. Graduated high school (not the top, but not even close to the worst)... He is now in Borden with over 2 years reg force under his belt.

He (of his own accord) ceased his meds during his application process. It was brought up during his med interview and they were more concerned with his dandruff!! Apparently, as an adult he was allowed to stop taking meds if he wished. Because they never felt that these were "life-sustaining" meds, no harm no foul I guess.

Personal experience ONLY... NOT to be taken as gospel.
 

George Wallace

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Please SEARCH and READ what has already been posted on this condition. 

http://army.ca/forums/threads/22352.0.html
 

OlivemanD

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Hello,
My name is Dawson and I have applied to the CAF under the ROTP, for three different positions, Health Care Administration Officer, Logistics Officer, and Artillery Officer,
I currently have ADHD, and I have been on 54mg Concerta (Methylphenid) doses since kindergarten. I am 17 now. I have completed, and passed the CFAT, and my application
has been approved for further processing. I am wondering if my ADHD, as well as the medication I am taking, will pose any issues during the medical exam. This is my first post,
so if I am posting this in the wrong area, please let me know. I should be getting the call to make an interview date anytime now, so if I could get an answer to this soon that would be great.
It seems that a lot of you guy's are quite knowledgeable, so I am sure someone will be able to help me out with my "predicament"
Thanks,
Dawson 
 

BinRat55

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You don't have a "predicament" you have a "situation". Situations can be handled many different ways as they are as unique to the individual as they are to the viewer. No one on this site can tell you how it will affect you and your enrollment status except for an MO (Medical Officer) and Ottawa. The closest person to offer any advice whatsoever would be DAA, and he should be along any moment!

See what your medical says, wait patiently and let us know how you made out.
 

OlivemanD

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Thank you, if anyone else has any views, opinions, or advice about my situation, please speak up, because I really want to know if my ADHD and meds will make things
harder for me.
D
 

OlivemanD

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That link does not work for me, I can only get on it if it is on milnet.ca, my computer does not allow me on army.ca, Is that topic from the link also on milnet? If I could have
the link for that, that would be awesome.
 

BinRat55

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OlivemanD said:
That link does not work for me, I can only get on it if it is on milnet.ca, my computer does not allow me on army.ca, Is that topic from the link also on milnet? If I could have
the link for that, that would be awesome.

https://milnet.ca/forums/threads/22352.150
 

HaZarD SFD

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I can only speak on my experience.  I was on ADHD Medication.  I was told I need to be off them for 12 months.  I can see why.  I have been and have done fine.  I am now getting my application back in the pile and from when I was given the notice, I only needed my Medical to get it to its final stages.
 

loganmoore

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It's been my lifelong goal to serve my country in the military... So in January 2015 I applied for the Army reserves as an infantry soldier. I did the physical screening in January, followed by the CFAT and medical interview in May. During the interview I was asked if I was ever diagnosed with ADHD, which I answered yes. I was diagnosed in 2005, at the age of 7. I brought the forms for my doctor to fill out, which he also added that I was diagnosed with PTSD in 2011, which I or any of my family never had any knowledge of.
After bringing them back, I received a call from CFRC Halifax saying I was medically unfit for military service due to these diagnoses. The letter I received weeks later said I could challenge the RMO's decision, which I did. I went back to my doctor to get re-tested for ADHD and PTSD. After seeing ADHD specialists it was found out I never had ADHD, as I was just tested at the age of 7, the peak of my hyperactivity and they said it was just called being a kid. The doctor also went through the file and realized he made a mistake, and it was my mother, not me that was diagnosed with PTSD. I was relieved and brought the doctors not back and reapplied.
Two weeks ago I received the same letter, medically unfit for the same reasons, even though I brought a detailed letter saying both diagnoses are false. It said once again that I can challenge the RMO's decision. Would it be worth it to try again? I'm willing to do whatever it takes to get into the military. Also, would it make a difference if I applied for a non-combat career? Infantry has been my lifelong dream, but I could settle for something else as long as I'm in uniform. Thanks.
 

BC Old Guy

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Yes - challenge the decision.  But rather than just repeating what you have gone through, make arrangements with the Recruiting Medical section through or at the Recruiting Centre.  The issue is that many civilian doctors do not provide the detail, nor do they answer the specific questions the Recruiting Medical Officer is asking.

By talking to the Recruiting Medical section, you should be able to get a list of specific questions they need to answer in order to reconsider your case.  There may be a specific form, or a specific series of questions, that they can provide a hand-out for you to take to your MD or specialist.

If the requirement is for a specific review by a specialist - go to that type of specialist, even if there is a wait time.

During my time in Recruiting HQ I spent some time talking with the Medical staff, and appreciate the issues they go through to ensure that medically fit Canadians are cleared for enrollment.  From my observation, many civilian MDs are very good at treatment, but not that good at completing reports providing specific items of information.

BCOG
 

mariomike

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loganmoore said:
During the interview I was asked if I was ever diagnosed with ADHD, which I answered yes. I was diagnosed in 2005, at the age of 7. I brought the forms for my doctor to fill out, which he also added that I was diagnosed with PTSD in 2011, which I or any of my family never had any knowledge of.


I went back to my doctor to get re-tested for ADHD and PTSD. After seeing ADHD specialists it was found out I never had ADHD, as I was just tested at the age of 7, the peak of my hyperactivity and they said it was just called being a kid. The doctor also went through the file and realized he made a mistake, and it was my mother, not me that was diagnosed with PTSD.

You may find these discussions of interest,

ADHD, ADD, and why we can't get in rants...... 
http://army.ca/forums/threads/22352.25
7 pages.

A common condition: ADHD, and How I overcame and fixed it to get into the CF.
https://army.ca/forums/threads/92008.0

I was tested for ADHD but never diagnosed 
http://army.ca/forums/threads/114085.0

loganmoore said:
It said once again that I can challenge the RMO's decision.

Challenging a medical decision/Requesting second review 
http://army.ca/forums/threads/37404.0

Medical appeal 
http://army.ca/forums/threads/68680.0

As always, your most reliable source of information is Recruiting.



 
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