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All Things Paul Franklin (merged)

the 48th regulator

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That was the best interview I have seen.

I have watery eyes and a lump in the throught, geez, he is a hero to look up to for all Canadians.

He spoke it exactly like how I felt coming back, years ago.

dileas

tess
 

R@chel

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What a great interview.  Paul did a great job, not that he could do anything but.

Well done!
 

CdnArtyWife

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I was very impressed and deeply moved. I missed it on the tv, but I watched the segment online, and though the video was extremely choppy the sound was fine...and really that is all I needed.

Wow...I would be humbled in his (and his wife's) presence...

Strong people.

Cheers,

CAW
 

3rd Horseman

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I watched it late last night......he was superb as usual. This was the second detailed interview I have seen of him and he is remarkable. A true hero, an example to all. His recollections were clear and his description of his new self once he came home rang true for me also. I just could not have put it as well as him so soon after my injury.
 

Journeyman

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I missed its original airing, so I just watched CBC's online version.

Without a doubt, the best 30 minutes of my life in recent memory.

Awesome, awesome interview.
 

simysmom99

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Thank you for all your great comments.  That was a hard interview and Paul was exhausted, but I thought he did very well.  I will make sure he hears all of this.
 

FuzzyLogic

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Paul McGrath of CBC has said that the interview will be posted to YouTube in a few days. 

I'll post the url as soon as it's up on YouTube.

It'll be great to share a genuine Canadian hero with the world.  YouTube has already given the Canadian soldier a forum to show his stuff ... and so far his stuff looks pretty good!

:salute:

 

Flip

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Last night on the National there was a report (a rerun actually)
about Master Corporal Paul Franklin. - very pleased to see it again. :)

But this morning who should be interviewed here in Edmonton
on CBC Radio?

The Northern Alberta Amputee Program is what's going on and
I must say - I'm damn proud of that guy! :salute:

Here's the link:

http://www.naap.med.ualberta.ca/

There was a brief mention of Noreen Golfman's skirmish with Rick Mercer.
- just excellent!

There is a Fund Raiser in Edmonton for the program - not sure when.
I'll get back with whatever I can.

Master Corporal Paul Franklin, Thank you for your service!!!


 

Kilroy

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While I in no way mean to diminish this man's courage, accomplishments and everything else he has done, (If I had 1/10th the willpower of this man I wouldn'r be so f****d up with PTSD right now. I must set the record straigh in that he DID NOT apply his own Tournaquit. Even one of the news articles stated, and I quote ***Franklin says he owes his life to a colleague who quickly tied a tourniquet to one of his shattered legs.***unquote. The simple fact that it appears he traind the gentleman who actually applied the tournaquit says something of the man. I have seen the medics in Sfghanistan, and had the chance to see them in action. I do not in anyway envy thier job, and i highly doubt I could evne do it myself. I just wanted to set the record straight, in saying that he did not apply the tournaquit himself.


:salute:
 

Cansky

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Thank you for the clarification on the tourniquet.  As soon as Paul was able to tell the world his tales he himself has set the record straight on this issue.  In the book "The long walk Home" is excellent explaintions about how this myth was started and how it affected Paul.  I know Paul personnelly, he is an amazing human being who has incredible strength of character.  Paul is an incredible spokesperson for the CF and all injured soldiers. 
Kirsten
 

Gunner

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Kirsten Luomala said:
Thank you for the clarification on the tourniquet.  As soon as Paul was able to tell the world his tales he himself has set the record straight on this issue.  In the book "The long walk Home" is excellent explaintions about how this myth was started and how it affected Paul.  I know Paul personnelly, he is an amazing human being who has incredible strength of character.  Paul is an incredible spokesperson for the CF and all injured soldiers. 
Kirsten

+ 1

Kilroy - the tourniquet issue was resolved a very very long time ago.  Next time check the dates on the posts as this thread has been ongoing since the attack on Paul in Dec 05.
 

Kilroy

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Gunner said:
+ 1

Kilroy - the tourniquet issue was resolved a very very long time ago.  Next time check the dates on the posts as this thread has been ongoing since the attack on Paul in Dec 05.

I read thru the entire thread and did not see mention of it. If I missed it, then I apologize. The reason I knew about this matter, was that it happened just before I got to Afghanistan myself.
 

The Bread Guy

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Good luck as you move along into the next phase of your life - thanks for the sacrifice, and for the promotion of the cause of the wounded  :salute:

Shared in accordance with the "fair dealing" provisions, Section 29, of the Copyright Act.

Soldier who became vocal advocate for disabled leaving military to further cause
The Canadian Press, 24 Sept 09
Article link

A soldier who has become a national advocate for the disabled after losing both his legs in a suicide bombing in Afghanistan in 2006 says he's leaving the military to do more charity work and speaking engagements.

Master Cpl. Paul Franklin says his career in the military has stagnated, likely because his injuries prevent him from completing the physical aspect of the courses that are required to receive promotions or postings to other military bases.

The army medic says while the military has made great strides in the way it treats injured soldiers, more needs to be done to ensure that they have good career opportunities in the armed forces.

Franklin says he has talked to senior officers who support such measures, but he says it could take years to change policies to allow the disabled a greater role in the military.

After he officially leaves his duties next month as a casualty support specialist helping other injured soldiers in Edmonton, Franklin says he will focus on his goal of creating the Franklin Foundation.

He sees it as a national group that would provide support for other amputee programs across Canada.
 

Scott

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Good luck Paul, you're an inspiration to all.
 

FormerHorseGuard

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good there MCPL
i hope some one here can keep us informed and let us know where to send money  to hel[p fund this when the time comes. I am in for 50. I know it is not much but i am out of work and living on odd jobs but that is my  pledge
 

basrah

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While it is a shame that Mr Franklin lost his legs, I must admit that I am a bit shocked at his constant presence in the media.

It is obviously very important that the Canadian public be informed and up to date on projects like soldier on, and other worthwhile causes, but some of the attention has been in my opinion, negative.

While listening to a radio station here in Edmonton, Paul was on the air. The station had a contest where listeners would call in, tell their most painful stories, and Paul would relate to how much pain he had been in, and how bad his suffering was. There have been a few other circumstances like this, and it is well known around certain units that he does go way overboard with the media, and it some times puts a negative view on the CF. I was personally shocked when I heard this on the air.

Besides all that though, I do wish him the best of luck in the future.
 

mariomike

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"Franklin says he will focus on his goal of creating the Franklin Foundation.
He sees it as a national group that would provide support for other amputee programs across Canada."

Good luck. The War Amps have helped many amputees since World War One:
http://www.waramps.ca/about/history.html



 

simysmom99

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Hi all this is Paul Franklin and thanks for the comments.

I may just want to say a few words on what was written in some posts.

First the War Amps is a very good organization that has a proud and respectable history.  That being said the current batch of war amputees and injured/ ill amputees are NOT helped by the War Amps. 
In the 1990's there was a time of fiscal restraint and as such the decision was made to focus on the CHAMPS program which helps children with amputation to receive and get training in prosthesis.  I asked in early 2006 and again in the summer of 2006 if they would like to use the new amputees to help their organization...my request was declined.  Mark Fuchko (fellow Afghan amp) asked in the summer of 2008 and was also turned down.  The War Amps of today does amazing work with kids and I finacially support them as best I can.

This does not diminish the fact that there are gaps in the care and charitable needs of amputees.
These gaps fall into three main areas.
Research
Education 
Peer support (The FF works with the Amputee Coaliton of Canada and the Amputee Coaliton of America to make this happen)

That is the goal of the Franklin Foundation (www.franklinfoundation.ca)  It was originally conceived in 2006 as the Northern Alberta Amputee Program and started from my experience while being a patient at the University of Alberta hospital and the Glenrose Rehab Hospital.  While there I noticed that the care I was receiving was for a longer time line than the civilian patients around me.  This and then the advanced prosthetic devices that I was allowed to own showed that there was a gap in what we got and in what civilians got.  There should be pairity for all amputees across Canada, be they military, police firefighters, EMT, doctors, car accident victims, diabetics, or someone who suffers an amputation from an illness.
In Canada this does not exist and as such my organization has the goal of ensuring that the military amps get the best care possible but also advocate for change so that other amputees can have the same benefits and equipment that they deserve.

We can allow someone who is sick or injured to stay at home and feel sorry for themselves or we can use our experiences in Afghan and other areas of operations to help change lives.  Soon amputees and other disabled will be in all aspects of life and work and this will allow them to have careers, incomes, pay taxes and be contributing members of society.

As a medic I feel it is my duty to help not only other soldiers but fellow citizens of Canada.  For this I make no apologies.

In 2006 when I was injured the CF was not where it is today.

The wounded and injured as well as the military higher chain of command has allowed change to occur that in the past was never possible.  We allow all wounded to stay in the CF even after a 3b medical injury that in the past would have guarenteed a medical release.

Injured soldiers receive some of the same benefits of the wounded but that is an area that needs some improvement.

In Sept 2006 I was asked if I would like to have fallen back into the medical chain of command instead of being an advocate for the wounded and doing speechs across the country about my story and the story of the good work we are doing in Afghan.
I declined and was eventually moved to LFWA to work with Casualty Support and help make changes to the system.  In this role I felt that exceptions do not do anyone any good and allowing one person to be promoted to SGT as a 3b and not another does not solve anything.  We need to change policy in one way or another.  State that a 100% disabled per is not wanted by the CF.....plain and simple.
If we don't say that then we need to find ways to use the experiences that our wounded and injured can provide to the CF.
Schools, training areas, advocates for the wounded, JPSU, Soldier On are all places that these types of mbrs can not only work but excel.  This means we also need to promote and allow these people to go on courses and postings. (sorry standing on my soap box now)  There are too many desk jobs and places that our 600 wounded and NBI can fit.  I believe its our duty to give them these positions and allow them to prosper.

The new VAC charter needs work and various wounded and injured soldiers are taking that torch.  This new charter has many great positive programs but the lump sum payments are too low for modern dollars and the income replacement piece is a slap in the face of the people that really need the care.

SISIP is in need of improvement as well.
i.e.  A one leg payment (amputation) is the same rate as it was in 1972.... $125 000.  Obviously 1972 dollars are not the same as 2009 dollars. 
This is being fought at in a court fight between some vets and SISIP (treasury board).

May I make a quick comment about my apperences in the media.
I have used the media as a tool to help move the bar in both the care that soldiers receive after injury and also for civilians.
I will make some negative comments but if you look at the messaging it is in general positive.  We have to showcase what is wrong as well as what is right and only then can we change things.

Just one good example is why someone who has an amputation can go back overseas and someone who is a diabetic is forced out of the military......

Change takes time and it will occur but it takes pressure from all sources to showcase what is wrong and how it can be fixed.

Also remember that the media sometimes gets it wrong.
The Sun article was three paragraphs long and they managed to squeeze in 3 mistakes.  The CBC article and radio piece were good and helped explain my upcoming retirement and my future goals.

I do not like to think that i am "quitting" the army but I am simply moving onto new and different things in my life.
I can be contacted by anyone at the below email and please look at the charity website to see what we do and how we do it.


MCpl (ret.) Paul Franklin (as of Nov 16th)
ptepaul@yahoo.co.uk
www.franklinfoundation.ca

Freedom Through Sports is our program that helps amputees get back some piece of their life.
www.ualberta.ca/SIGNATURE/freedom.html

Amputee Coaliton of Canada is a program that focuses on peer support and accrediting amputees so that they have the knowledge to talk to new amps in a way that does not hurt their recovery. The ACC gets its program and mandate from the American program which is widely used in Walter Reed Army Medical Centre and San Antonio's Intrepid Centre.  The FF financially supports the ACC in providing peer support programs and instruction qualifications across Canada.
www.amputeecoalitioncanada.org/






 

daftandbarmy

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simysmom99 said:
Hi all this is Paul Franklin and thanks for the comments.

I may just want to say a few words on what was written in some posts.

First the War Amps is a very good organization that has a proud and respectable history.  That being said the current batch of war amputees and injured/ ill amputees are NOT helped by the War Amps. 
In the 1990's there was a time of fiscal restraint and as such the decision was made to focus on the CHAMPS program which helps children with amputation to receive and get training in prosthesis.  I asked in early 2006 and again in the summer of 2006 if they would like to use the new amputees to help their organization...my request was declined.  Mark Fuchko (fellow Afghan amp) asked in the summer of 2008 and was also turned down.  The War Amps of today does amazing work with kids and I finacially support them as best I can.

This does not diminish the fact that there are gaps in the care and charitable needs of amputees.
These gaps fall into three main areas.
Research
Education 
Peer support (The FF works with the Amputee Coaliton of Canada and the Amputee Coaliton of America to make this happen)

Well done Paul, thank you for your work, and best of luck in the future.

Through my civvy career I have recently made contact with some folks in the Rick Hansen foundation here in BC. If you're interested in connecting with them through my contacts, fire me a PM and I'll see what I can do.

Cheers,

D&B
 
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