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Canadian Federal Election 44 - Sep 2021

The Bread Guy

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Hey look, Trudeau's first post-election apology.


Trudeau apologizes to First Nation in B.C. for not following up on Truth and Reconciliation Day invite​

Link


Sorry, he's busy in meetings all day :cool:
More of the same ...
The national chief of the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) has criticized Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s decision to go on a holiday on the same day Canada marked its first National Day of Truth and Reconciliation to honour lost children and survivors of residential schools.

(...)

In an interview with The West Block’s Mercedes Stephenson Sunday, National Chief RoseAnne Archibald of the Assembly of First Nations said that the government’s “words and actions have to be aligned.”

“When the prime minister talks about reconciliation, please, you know, don’t go on a holiday on the very first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. Participate in an event on the day, not the day before. That would be more in alignment with his real commitment to reconciliation.”...
 

McG

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To be fair, this is the reason many veterans don’t believe Remembrance Day should be a statutory holiday. As soon as the day is a stat, the name is window dressing and the day really becomes about everyone’s self. Sure, I expected the PM would lead the observance of at least one iteration of this holiday before following the lowest common denominator. But he didn’t. He did illustrate that a day of solemn reflection will be quickly forgotten over the option of a “me day.”
 

brihard

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To be fair, this is the reason many veterans don’t believe Remembrance Day should be a statutory holiday. As soon as the day is a stat, the name is window dressing and the day really becomes about everyone’s self. Sure, I expected the PM would lead the observance of at least one iteration of this holiday before following the lowest common denominator. But he didn’t. He did illustrate that a day of solemn reflection will be quickly forgotten over the option of a “me day.”
I think an appropriate observance for him would have been for him to attend and to be seen attending an indigenous-led ceremony or event, but not to speak as part of it. Some sort of separate presser afterwards, sure- but the right call would have been to be seen listening.
 

mariomike

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To be fair, this is the reason many veterans don’t believe Remembrance Day should be a statutory holiday.
I remember CAF members like my uncle killed in war.

Like many others, I had to work it anyway. So, it also meant,
If the employee works on the actual holiday the employee will be paid two (2) times his regular rate of pay for the time so worked and in addition shall be paid for the full day or night at his regular rate of pay.
 

Infanteer

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To be fair, this is the reason many veterans don’t believe Remembrance Day should be a statutory holiday. As soon as the day is a stat, the name is window dressing and the day really becomes about everyone’s self. Sure, I expected the PM would lead the observance of at least one iteration of this holiday before following the lowest common denominator. But he didn’t. He did illustrate that a day of solemn reflection will be quickly forgotten over the option of a “me day.”
I hear this trotted out, but haven't seen it play out this way. Remembrance Day ceremonies (up until COVID) are still well attended by the communities I've been in.
 

Navy_Pete

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To be fair, this is the reason many veterans don’t believe Remembrance Day should be a statutory holiday. As soon as the day is a stat, the name is window dressing and the day really becomes about everyone’s self. Sure, I expected the PM would lead the observance of at least one iteration of this holiday before following the lowest common denominator. But he didn’t. He did illustrate that a day of solemn reflection will be quickly forgotten over the option of a “me day.”
I was a big fan when I moved to Ontario when the kids were still in school for Remembrance day; pretty difficult to keep a little kid involved in one of the memorial services at a Cenotaph (especially on a bad weather day), and they do a pretty good job at the school ones of making it meaningful.

Was looking for something similar for the TRC day, but wasn't really anything organized on the day of, outside what was on tv. There was a really good GoC one run during the work day a few weeks ago with some guest speakers, but maybe next year with more time to organize things and COVID restrictions eased up might be something similar. But it's a lot easier to put together a Remembrance Day ceremony, whereas TRC is a lot more complicated.
 

daftandbarmy

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I'll believe it when I see the tears flow...

7036888_2.jpg
 

daftandbarmy

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I hear this trotted out, but haven't seen it play out this way. Remembrance Day ceremonies (up until COVID) are still well attended by the communities I've been in.

I agree. Attendance has been increasing at cenotaph events too.

From 2019, Pre-COVID:

Remembrance Day ceremonies likely to see another increase this year​



More and more Canadians are attending Remembrance Day ceremonies every year and it appears this coming Monday, Nov. 11, will be no different.

A new survey suggests that more than 41 per cent of Canadians plan to attend ceremonies honouring fallen service members on Monday.

 

Remius

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I hear this trotted out, but haven't seen it play out this way. Remembrance Day ceremonies (up until COVID) are still well attended by the communities I've been in.
Agreed. I’ve been at the NWM in Nov 11th most years and the place is packed. And early. Regardless of weather.
 

McG

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I hear this trotted out, but haven't seen it play out this way. Remembrance Day ceremonies (up until COVID) are still well attended by the communities I've been in.
I have seen good and bad turn outs for Remembrance Day events, and every major city will have one or two events that draw crowds. But it’s important to keep in mind that a tiny percentage of a very large population is still a big number. 5,000 people would represent only about a half a percent of either the national capital region or Edmonton.

A lot of PPC supporters looked around at crowds attending their rallies and believed the party was on to something popularly supported by Canadians, but they couldn’t see the majority of us were not there with them.

I believe it is important to reflect on the cost of war and to remember our fallen. I have seen the crowds that can come out in cities, but I am aware that those crowds represent only the data points that came out to be seen. I do not believe that the majority of Canadians place remembrance higher than a spa day or family vacation.
 

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Remius

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I have seen good and bad turn outs for Remembrance Day events, and every major city will have one or two events that draw crowds. But it’s important to keep in mind that a tiny percentage of a very large population is still a big number. 5,000 people would represent only about a half a percent of either the national capital region or Edmonton.

A lot of PPC supporters looked around at crowds attending their rallies and believed the party was on to something popularly supported by Canadians, but they couldn’t see the majority of us were not there with them.

I believe it is important to reflect on the cost of war and to remember our fallen. I have seen the crowds that can come out in cities, but I am aware that those crowds represent only the data points that came out to be seen. I do not believe that the majority of Canadians place remembrance higher than a spa day or family vacation.
We also don’t have the gong show Event sales and discount days we see south of the border on days like that. Every school does something. Most businesses that are open actually stop at the 11th hour. I think it’s better than you think. It isn’t perfect by any means though.
 

The Bread Guy

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Another take on the Tofino trip (article opens with a push to subscribe, the meat IS there lower down) ....
... To call this an error in judgment fundamentally misunderstands Justin Trudeau’s psychology and what motivates him. As far as we at The Line can tell, the timing of this trip, the location, and the predictable negative reaction, was very deliberate, and is entirely in keeping with the prime minister’s previous behaviour. To put it bluntly, the prime minister is taking a suck attack.

(...)

Rejection is hard for any of us to take, but Justin Trudeau seems to take it harder than most. What we are seeing right now in Tofino is Suck Attack 2: Justin’s Break Point. The prime minister seems to have decided something like the following: “If you don’t love me for the noble do-gooder I know I am, fine. I’ll be the jerk you think I am.”

His behaviour on the beach on Thursday wasn’t bad judgment, it was a deliberate heel turn. And if you are wondering why his advisers and officials didn’t stop him, it might be worth considering that they feel entirely the same way.
 

mariomike

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To be fair, this is the reason many veterans don’t believe Remembrance Day should be a statutory holiday.
According to our unofficial poll, 62% say it should.

September 30 was a paid stat. holiday for Peel Region employees.
Region of Peel offices and non-emergency services will be closed in observance of National Day for Truth and Reconciliation on Thursday, September 30 and will reopen Friday, October 1.


Not sure how typical that was for municipal employees in the rest of Canada.
 

dimsum

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September 30 was a paid stat. holiday for Peel Region employees.

Not sure how typical that was for municipal employees in the rest of Canada.
It wasn't where I was...at least I don't think so. It was pretty busy with people going to/from work.
 

Altair

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A new poll suggests that Canadians rely heavily on a political party’s platform when deciding who to vote for, and that young voters are more likely to be influenced by online exchanges than others.


As Canadians come to terms with the results of the most recent federal election, the Research Co. poll found that 59 per cent of Canadians felt a party’s platform was “very influential” or “moderately influential” in their voting decision.

The actual party platforms are very influential when Canadians are choosing who they will support in the federal election,” said Research Co. president Mario Canseco.

In fact, it’s more influential than conversations with families and friends or what people see on social media, Canseco said. More than 40 per cent of Canadian voters said discussions with family and discussions with friends influenced their vote, while only 35 per cent mentioned campaign ads on radio and television as an influence.

Age also affected how people were influenced to vote, Canseco said. For those aged 18 to 34, 43 per cent said social media interactions with candidates on social media influenced who they voted for, compared to 30 per cent of Canadian voters of all ages. That same Gen Z and young millennial age group was also more likely to be influenced by interactions with others over social media (44 per cent) than the general population of voters (26 per cent).

When broken down by party lines, nearly 75 per cent of People’s Party voters cited the platform as a major influence, while 67 per cent of Conservative voters and 64 per cent of Liberal voters said the same. Among NDP voters, 64 per cent said the party’s platform was a major influence, 39 per cent of Green voters and 19 per cent of Bloc Québécois supporters.

I'll just leave this here.
 

dimsum

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To be fair, this is the reason many veterans don’t believe Remembrance Day should be a statutory holiday. As soon as the day is a stat, the name is window dressing and the day really becomes about everyone’s self.
For another comparison, ANZAC Day is a stat in both Australia and NZ.

Their services (especially the Dawn Service at...well..dawn) are very well attended. You pretty much had to be there an hour before the service starts to get anything resembling a standing spot within visual range of the cenotaph.
 

daftandbarmy

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What do we want?

Great leadership!

What do we get?

Trudeau!

:)

KINSELLA: Justin Trudeau irredeemably deserving of outrage​


Who gives pious, sanctimonious speeches -- and then lies about where he is, and heads out to check out the waves?


When you’ve worked in politics or journalism for a while, you kind of lose your idealism, you know?

It happens because, in politics and journalism, you get exposed so regularly to the very worst in human nature. Lying, deceit, wrongdoing: You see a lot of it. Too much of it.

So you develop ways to cope. Some drink, some do drugs, some screw around. But most everyone in politics and journalism lose some (or all) of their passion. They get tired, they get cynical.

Most of all, they lose their capacity to feel outrage.

Having dabbled in both politics and journalism, I sometimes feel like that. That — after seeing too many scandals and hearing too many lies — I can’t feel actual outrage anymore.

You know, outrage. The dictionary people all define it as “a feeling of anger and shock.” Not anger or shock. Both.

That’s what I felt when I my colleague Brian Lilley called me, Thursday, to tell me where Justin Trudeau was. I had just gotten off the line with my Indigenous daughter, and I thought Brian was joking, at first. But he wasn’t.

Justin Trudeau was in B.C., on a surfer’s beach. That’s what Brian Lilley told me.

What was astonishing about that was twofold. One, the Office of the Prime Minister had flat-out, bald-faced lied about where he was. They issued an official statement, on PMO letterhead and everything, that said Trudeau was in Ottawa.

He wasn’t. He was four provinces to the West.

But here’s the other reason why it was such a shock, why it has whipped up a tsunami of anger: Justin Trudeau had blown off meetings with Indigenous people to hang out on a beach with surfers. On the very first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation.


 

Bruce Monkhouse

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I'll just leave this here.
Should have left it in the trash where it belonged.....WTF did they expect people to say? I voted because I like socks??? Seriously stupid....


I'd have asked them after to quote one section of each parties platform,....I'll bet that would have been funny.
 
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