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Quitting Smoking

PPCLI Guy

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PPCLI Gal and I are about to try again - and this time, I can't wait.  This week is a bad one for us, but come the end of the long weekend, we intend to be free.  Other than money, my motivation is simple - every year my caboose gets bigger, the troops get younger, and my lungs get smaller...
 
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17thRecceSgt

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I am on day # 3 now.  Started Sunday ( I was bored at the airport, almost 6 hour wait for my flight on Saturday so I ended up with a smoke in my face).

Doing it cold turkey, and am doing it "week by week".  My goal this week is to not smoke at all.  I am half way there.

Sunday when I wake up, I do it all over again.

When I feel like a smoke, I am gonna do whatever I have to not to go get some.  Thinking of dying of lung/throat/mouth cancer and all that is working for me so far, and I actually googled those subjects and found some motivating pictures.

Luck to all, stick with it!

Mud
 

Kat Stevens

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I tried a few times before it actually took.  I believe it's all in the mindset....The first couple times I was not really all that intertested in stopping, this time I sat myself down and gave myself a good stern lecture.  Convince yourself just how stupid it really is to pay large dinero to kill yourself.  Plus, it really does look kinda silly, doesn't it?
 

CFGF2MP

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It's been over a year since I quit smoking and it's been four years of trying to quit.  I got lucky this last time, the BF isn't a smoker wasn't about to let me smoke around him.  I decided that I was way more interested in spending time with him then having a smoke then trying to cover it up.  Trying to quit around friends and family and especially spouses who smoke makes it that much harder, so if at all possible try to see these people in a place neither one of you can light up.  That may be hard, but just like a coffee or a drink these people trigger your need for a smoke all the same.  There are many of my friends who I don't spend as much time with anymore because we only talk with a cig and a drink in our hands and that just isn't who I want to be anymore. 

The other factor that REALLY helped me stop was choosing not to have that smoke.  Now this may sound silly but the difference between quitting or not "allowing" myself have a cigarette and making the choice not to have one is huge.  Choosing not to smoke, choosing not to ruin my cardio even more, choosing not to stink is the right choice.  Denying myself that instant pleasure of not lighting up feels like punishment, and I'm not one to say no to something that feels so good...for a few minutes.  Even if choosing not to have a cigarette, even if it only works for a half  hour is still a half  hour closer to your goal.  It worked for me.




 

Hunter

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I fell off the wagon this past weekend.  I was on my way to my sister's wedding Saturday when a head-on collision happened in front of me.  I needed a smoke after that one, it was waaay too close for comfort. 

So, I'm starting back at square one again, something that it seems a lot of people on this list have had to do.  From the Quit4Life website, this is what it says about unsuccessful attempts to quit:

"No one likes to fail. But people who try difficult challenges aren't a failure. Don't you admire people who try to do things they believe in? Everyone who seriously tries to quit is a winner. Even if you don't quit for good, each quit attempt allows you to learn something important about yourself and your smoking. You can use each quit attempt to figure out how you will do things differently on your next quit attempt. What seemed to be a roadblock can become just another giant step forward."

As the saying goes, get knocked down 6 times, stand up 7 (or something like that). 
 

gaspasser

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Well Folks, just to add my 2 cents worth (and I do have it now that I'm quitting) I started when I was 13 cuz it was cool and all the cool kids were doing it.  Lordie, what we did in those days to get in with the right people.  I quit (once) in 2004 for about 10 months using the patch.  Woke up one morning, couldn't catch a breathe and said that was that.  Put on a patch and in three weeks I was done.  Luckily for me I got CRS (can't remember s**t) and forgot that I smoked until I picked it back up again after a deployment.  Stress will do that to you. 
  So here I am again, three years later, woke up hacking and said today's the day.  Patch on!  Had one or two every now and then, but stuck with the plan. I suppose it doesn't help with 9er smoking up a chimney either.  It's been only two days (again!)  I hate to say that I'm a quitter but this is one of those times it's a good thing. 
  Note to others: the first time I quit, I signed for the Butt-Out program but started early.  They talk about "triggers" for smoking and it sure helps to stay away from those.  Drinking coffee-tea or BEER, driving in the car and being bored are your usual triggers to have a smoke.  Stay away from those and you'll do fine.  I sure miss my coffee!!! ;D  but I don't miss the smokes.
  Good luck all if and when you quit.  I feel better.  Not sure I'll start doing marathons or anything. ;D
  Out 
 
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17thRecceSgt

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Hunter said:
I fell off the wagon this past weekend.  I was on my way to my sister's wedding Saturday when a head-on collision happened in front of me.  I needed a smoke after that one, it was waaay too close for comfort.   

Well between me, you, the fence post, and Army.ca, I think we can understand that one.

Hope all is well.  Give it another shot when ya can.  :salute:
 

Hunter

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Hey thanks Recce Man, much appreciated.  I had a few smokes that day and wasn't going to apologize to anyone - daughter included.  I'm back on the wagon again.  We'll see how it goes though.  One day at a time.
:salute:
 

rmacqueen

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I have decided to quit, stop date is 25 Sep.

I started smoking when I was 12 so have been at it for over 30 years.  I have tried a couple of times in the past but at 3am in a slit trench bored out of you mind, well... (you should see what a lighter does to night vision goggles)

I have the usual reasons for quiting, health, etc but my biggest incentive is that I found out this week that my daughter can't stand to hug me because of the smell.  I can't think of any bigger reason.

I am going whole hog in the stop smoking program.  I have seen the doctor and he is putting me on the Zyban/patch combo(tried a sample piece of the gum and it took me 24 hours just to get rid of the taste, yuck)  As part of it I am also going to take up jogging in the morning, the time I would normally be chain smoking with a cup of coffee.  Call it a mid life crisis but talking to everyone on here has reminded me of the shape I used to be in as a soldier so I am determined to try and get some of that back.

So, there you have it, a testimonial how Army.ca has changed my life ;D
 

gaspasser

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Well tomorrow is my 43rd (yeech, where did the time go) birthday and I am now good and quit (again). My last official cigarette was three weeks ago, had the odd puff off the wife's but not going back. 
Good luck to all who are going try to quit.
Cheers, GP
 

pinkbug

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It's all different for everyone.
I smoked for about 12 years and woke up one morning and just called it quits.
Of course, it didn't work! I was at the local watering hole on Saturday and lit one up.
But that following Monday, I caught a cold/flu and the taste was awfull.
I quit then.

What motivated me ?  Those ugly pictures they place on the cigarette packages in Canada.
Those rotten teeth and lungs. That was wnough to make me quit.
I can honnestly say I feel in good health now. No more huffin' & puffin' going up and down the stairs ...
One thing tho, I need to loose about 25 lbs. I find it's harder to loose weight than it is to quit smoking!

Best of luck to those that wants to quit.
You need to be determined and motivated to acheive it.
 
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I remember being fifteen years old and forcing myself to smoke, so I can be cool like the other kids who were hanging around the smoking area at school. It was a cool factor at the time. I continue smoking when I joined the forces. By that time it was a part of my life. It appeared that nearly everyone in the Forces smoked then. We even had a smoking section in our Mess Hall. Then smoking areas popped up everywhere and smoking was banded in all Government buildings. I was posted in CFE Lahr at the time. Drinking Beer and smoking was again, just a part of life. I finally came up with the notion to quit when one day I realized that every morning, on my way to work, I had to have a smoke. Here I was in a nice new car and I would smoke a cigarette before arriving to my unit. I actually hated that cigarette, but yet, I would have one anyways. It didn't make any sense to me that I was doing something I didn't want to.
   Quitting was no easy task. I found that if you keep on quitting, it eventually gets easier.I didn't even get pass lunch time on my first day. Finally, after a dozen attempts I did it. My 28th birthday was coming up and I then decided that the time has finally come for me to beat this. I picked my Birth date to be the day. I did it "Cold Turkey".  I wasn't going to let a small cigarette beat an Army guy. I can do this.Then the smoking urges were getting worst and frequent. They were lasting for about 20 seconds and can be very tempting to light up. I was reading an Article at the time on the importance of water consumption. That 70% of our body is water. And, that it is important to drink at least 8 glasses of water a day. At the time I would be lucky if I drank one glass of water a day. So, I decided to drown my urges. Everytime I had an urge to smoke, I would drink down a whole glass of water.It worked, It took care of my smoking urges and also giving me adeqaute amount of fluids to my body. Getting posted back to Canada helped too. All the Malls and Restaurants went smoke free and then eventually the Bars went smoke free as well. It's been thirteen years now and I love the fact that a small cigarette does not have control of me.
I was a Crewman when I left Germany and remustered to Medic. My first years as a TQ3, I worked mostly on an Oncology ward of a CF Hospital. I saw many people die from lung cancer in that ward. It tore a piece of my heart out everytime. It is one of the most unfair things that can happen to someone. They passed on too early in their lives.
Everday I see young soldiers hanging around the smoking area puffing away and I think to myself, That was me at that age. I try not to preach to them too much. I know that would of made me smoke even more for some reason. I had to combat this habit on my own. And,I did. Now, I hope this post I wrote will help someone in some way.

Salut





 
J

Jacqueline

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I quit three years ago because my very good friend and neighbour died in his sleep from lung cancer at age 33. The neighbourhood used at have big ol' barbeques until he died. Also acquaintances, and people I seen around have died from smoking. I smoked for 4 years and quit cold turkey. It was hard, but I really wanted to be independent (from cigarettes) so it wasn't that hard. Not to mention what it does to your body as motivation.  :p
 

camochick

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It's been 7 days since my last cigarette. I miss them, I almost want to have a funeral for them, since it feels like i've lost my best friend. My husband (a non smoker who hates smoking) told me that if i quit the smoking he would get me a personal trainer at our gym. So since I have an appoinment with the trainer this week I figure I will keep up my end of the bargain and stay away from my smoking co-workers.
I found that the first few days were easy, but now it seems the cravings are getting worse. I'm going to take it one day at a time, and hopefully I'm done with them for good. It's kind of nice to wake up and be able to breathe.
 

niner domestic

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Camochick, that is awesome that you've made it over the hump of the first week.  Congrats! 

I'm celebrating my 10th month of non smoking and I still feel very pleased with myself for quitting.  I don't miss it in the least, which was the number one reason I never seriously tried before to quit.  I was so afraid of feeling like I was missing something.  I read this book that really helped and one sentence stood out and said volumes to me..." You can make the choice to be a smoker who simply can't smoke anymore and live your life denying yourself that cigarette and being miserable or you can make the choice to be a non-smoker who doesn't smoke."

I made the choice of the latter and haven't felt icky at all.  What also firmed it up for me was the comment I made to the husband.. "Well dear, I've tried this smoking thing for 20 years, now I'll try the quitting thing for the next 20 and see how I make out." I'm really liking it so far!



 

Samsquanch

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I was a smoker for the last 8 years about a half pack a day. My grandpa passed away last year from emphysema (from smoking) that day I threw out the pack of cig. buts stomped on them and haven't had a single drag since. It isn't the quantity of life I was concerned about it was the quality..... hooked up to an oxygen tank and not being very mobile is really crappy. Everything tastes better I don't use as much salt on food, I can run twice as fast and I can smell everything which is sometimes bad if you work with the hygienically challenged.

I found the first three days easy. However the next three weeks are hell. I had cold sweats, nightmares, shaky hands, headaches and I got angry at people for no reason. I learned that don't go play poker, run before going to a smoking environment (less inclined to smoke after running), if you have a choice don't live with a smoker, buy lots of mints and gum, quit drinking for the first little while because smokes go great with beer and beers also lower the willpower. Being sick sucks, cancer sucks, oxygen tanks suck, surgery sucks, emphysema sucks, medication that messes you up sucks...........not being able to enjoy the last 25 years of your life sucks. Quit smoking and you will feel better after the first horrible month if you are like me, I don't even like being near other people smoking now.Good luck
 

KwaiLo

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My wife and I decided to quit towards the end of 2006.  In looking into the cessation aids, we came across Nicorette Inhalers.  I have been 2 weeks without smoking so far, and have only WANTED a smoke 2 times.  Having the little plastic stick in my mouth has helped me as much as the nicotine, I am sure of it.

I don't know how many packs a day a person would have had to have smoked to need the reccomended dose of the Inhaler though.  I have been using 1/3 of what is said, and think I would be physicaly ill if I used more.

A few people at work are telling me they are watching closely how I do, as they are interested in quitting as well.

Luck to all who are trying.
 

beands

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My plan/story:

Started smoking cig's and pot at 18, now I'm 23. It has now been 40 days since I put down the herb. I am absolutely 100% confident I won't smoke pot again.
I have had no withdrawls from it, and to be completely honest, can't even describe the feeling to even miss how it felt.

I planned to quit smoking cigs at the same time, and let me tell you, that is a whole different ball game folks.
Since I searched quiting smoking and found this here thread, I have a brand new (or shall I say "re-found") reason to quit. That would be my goal of joining the CF.
Stopped the pot for that very reason, and planned smokes for it too. The struggle has been great. But, I am down to 3 smokes right now, and planned to pick up more in the morning.
Since finding this thread, I have changed plans and will NOT be buying more in the morning.
If I am back on this one writing in, I will have stumbled. Otherwise I will have conquered my feats. (I am holding my application back for the 6 months required to be clean of pot, by personal choice. Hopefully I can quit smoking cigs in this time.)

The method I will be using, my uncle used when on tour in Bosnia. He put his last few smoked cig butts in a 590ml pop bottle with a small bit of water. He carried that every day, and when he figured he needed a smoke, just crack the lid and took as big a sniff of the fumes in the bottle as he could. Puked many times but as he put it...
"Turns you right the hell off to smoking 'em"


Thanks in advance for the luck wished upon me!  ;D
 

N-CK

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I found quitting smoking to be one of the most rewarding experiences of my life.  I smoked all through high school, despite playing every sport imaginable and never had a problem.  To tell the truth, I have never disliked smoking, but I had a real problem with having an addiction.  I first quit in college for 6 months or so only because nobody at my school really smoked.  I saw all the guido's standing outside shivering so hard they could barely hold the thing and it made me think I would be better off going to the gym or having a protein shake.  This all went really well...until i dropped out.

Then I declared martial law on my body, any healthy enzymes were to be eradicated and replaced with carcinogens.  Needless to say, I developed the ability to drink myself sober, forget my middle name on a weekly basis and magically make 25 cigarettes disappear in one night.  I was a real role model I tell ya.  Finally I made a pact with the tiles on my bathroom floor that I would clean my act up.  Unfortunately at this point I had a full blown pack a day addiction and realized I would need some help.

I don't know about you guys, but if you ask me, Zyban should just not be legal.  After the first sleepless week of rearranging furniture and polishing wooden spoons I tossed the entire bottle.  Relapsed again since working in the service industry it is very common place (anyone who has ever been a waiter or a cook before would know this) as the only break you can really get is if you smoke.  Nobody really gets 5 minutes to have a seat and relax, you only stop moving if you smoke.  Naturally lots of people who have never smoked before are inclined to try.  That's why everytime you go to a nice neighbourhood pub your middle aged waitress likely has yellow fingers and a leatherface, combined with a voice that would make Oscar the Grouch cringe. 

It wasn't I got a nasty infection in my throat that I was motivated to put cigarettes down for good.  You start to really enjoy fresh air after a week of only being able to drink water, and eat blended fruits.  The best part was the doctor having to pop what he called the "big pussy things" that were holding up my tonsils.  Then after recovering from the most disgusting taste and intense pain get a half hour lecture on smoking.  It wasn't cancer, but it sure scared me away from every picking the sticks up again. 

Since then I adopted a policy of doing something positive for myself everytime I crave a smoke.  It usually is as little as chewing a piece of whitening gum, the chewing really helps, and the knowledge that there is a little bit of good in it for your teeth helps even more.  Also the phrase "an apple a day keeps the doctor away" works even better with dentists.  The texture of the fruit will scrub your teeth and massage your gums. 

Then, just to be sure that you are REALLY committed to not smoking, find someone (preferably someone you know or at least have bought a drink) that smokes and give them a big sloppy smooch.  Once you have done that you are to taste your lips and the entire inside of your mouth...then realize that despite all the cologne and breathmints, that is how you have tasted for all those years. 

p.s. bonus points for the guys when their moustache returns to its original colour


cheers
 
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