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Quitting Smoking

JBoyd

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I started smoking at 14, smoked straight until I was about 24, was up to about 3/4 of a pack a day, took Zyban and quit for close to a year, ended up working  somewhere where everyone happened to smoke and ended up starting again.. and kicking myself about it to boot. When I made the decision to apply to the CF and start a physical training program I quit... on the spot... cold turkey. Was easy for the first week.. then the cravings set in... I am lucky enough to now work in an area where 1) I dont get much time to even go to the bathroom let alone contemplate a smoke break, and 2) no one I work with smokes. I do get cravings when I am really stressed, but I look at why I quit and what I have accomplished since I quit and it takes me away from that place. Truth be told there is no easy quit smoking scheme, what works for one may not work for another, to those that wish to quit smoking I suggest trying what you can until you find what works, and make sure you have a good reason for quitting, one that will help you steer clear of starting up again.

As for Zyban, I dont know how many know it but it is better known as Wellbutrin or Bupropion, which is an antidepressant. Apparently the ability to aid in quiting smoking is a side effect, which they have effectively marketed into a primary use.
 

284_226

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For anyone serving that is not aware, the CF Butt Out program is now covering probably going to cover  (decision expected this week) the prescription for "Champix" ("Chantix" as it is marketed in the USA).  More information can be found about Champix here - http://www.chantix.com

The only caveat is that members must have tried all three of the other smoking cessation aids (Zyban, nicotine patch, nicotine gum) on previous Butt Out attempts.

I'm on my way this morning for my prescription for Champix - I'll let you know how it turns out.

And yes, I'm a 10-time graduate of the Butt Out program...wish me luck (and a lot of willpower).

Edit:  My impression from the Butt Out facilitator was that it had already been approved - it is not yet, but the pharmacist expects it to be approved before the Xmas break.
 

kj_gully

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my wife quit by using Champix, she preaches it like religion. It is worth funding yourself, and has an excellent success ratio. If you are committed enough to pay for it yourself, it is one more sign you are ready to quit. I think she spent  about $150 on it, got nicorette and patches from the military to support, but didn't use them. She has been smoke free since she started in september, and is going thru the christmas party season with very few cravings. She found it absolutely worth it. Good luck to everyone trying to quit, and keep at it.
 

JVJA

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284_226 said:
For anyone serving that is not aware, the CF Butt Out program is now covering probably going to cover  (decision expected this week) the prescription for "Champix" ("Chantix" as it is marketed in the USA).  More information can be found about Champix here - http://www.chantix.com

The only caveat is that members must have tried all three of the other smoking cessation aids (Zyban, nicotine patch, nicotine gum) on previous Butt Out attempts.

I'm on my way this morning for my prescription for Champix - I'll let you know how it turns out.

And yes, I'm a 10-time graduate of the Butt Out program...wish me luck (and a lot of willpower).

Edit:  My impression from the Butt Out facilitator was that it had already been approved - it is not yet, but the pharmacist expects it to be approved before the Xmas break.

Can anyone confirm if this med has been approved for funding through the Butt Out program? I am on leave right now and have signed up for the program  but haven't chosen  my exact quit date yet.

I found Zyban effective the first time (8 yrs ago) but after I restarted smoking I tried it again, and it seemed to have no effect. (maybe I bought the placebo batch)
I would like to try something new - and have heard much praise.

Thks
 

Old Ranger

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Laser Therapy!

I'm on day 4 not smoking after 20+ years smoking.
The laser helps with the cravings, you just have to figure out what to do with the rest of your time.

Made the mistake of picking up one of the wife's cigarettes last night and almost puked instantly.
I've tried both patches, gum, wellbutrin, hot and cold turkey.

Will see how it goes!
 

midgetcop

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Thought I'd throw in my experiences on here...

I smoked for 13 years, since I was 13 years old. I worked pretty hard at getting addicted, God knows that cigarettes are damn disgusting when you're that age. But, as most can empathize, it was a way to feel 'grown-up' and 'cool'. A social tool. It wasn't long before it was a physical and psychological addiction, where I went through ENDLESS cycles of quitting for periods at a time. I was great at quitting - I must have quit hundreds of times! I was just equally as good at starting again. Someone at work mentioned a book to me by Allen Carr on how to quit smoking. He told me that as soon as he read the book, he instantly quit. I was pretty skeptical....I mean, I'm not usually one to put lot of faith in 'flaky' self-help books. But I was becoming increasingly frustrated at my lack of commitment and motivation, so I gave it a shot as a last ditch effort.

The book really explains all those reasons for WHY we smoke (I say 'we', because addiction works in a universal way) and the arguments/rationalizations that people use to feed their addictions. I won't explain the entire book, but all I can say is that I've successfully quit smoking, and I'm confident that I'll never do it again. The great thing is - I don't miss is. I don't feel that I've deprived myself of anything. I feel absolutely great about it.

Mods - I promise, I'm not a paid advertiser! But if anyone is interested about the book, feel free to give me a PM and I'll give you more details.

And to all those in the process - best of luck!
 

Springroll

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Old Ranger said:
Laser Therapy!

I'm on day 4 not smoking after 20+ years smoking.
The laser helps with the cravings, you just have to figure out what to do with the rest of your time.

Made the mistake of picking up one of the wife's cigarettes last night and almost puked instantly.
I've tried both patches, gum, wellbutrin, hot and cold turkey.

Will see how it goes!

Old Ranger, have you had any cravings at all after the treatment?
My mother, step father and one of my bosses have quit using laser therapy and none of them have experienced any cravings what so ever. Did you use the detox methods too?
I am looking into this method now since the Zyban isn't working this time around.
 

Yrys

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When I read/heard about smokers wanting to quit,
I can'T keep from wanting to kiss me/hug me
because I never started and because I resisted
bullying in high school to start.

Congratulations to all people that are trying.

Oprah made a show about quitting smoking , so there is some reference
about it on her web site...


Stop Smoking: Videotaping Instructions
 

Old Ranger

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Springroll- haven't forgotten just working at it.  Laser did curb physical cravings for sure, it's the psychological ones that get you. What Detox methods are you refering to?

Midge- Thank-you for the book info! Amazing book! Only $15.00 Book!

"Allen Carr's Easy way To Stop Smoking" ISBN 978-1-905555-14-7 if anyone's wondering (I have no financial ties to this book, other than it has already paid for itself)

I'm just trying to get my wife to read it and stop smoking with me.
It is more difficult with a smoker around you all the time, but I'm trying every day. More practice makes easier the cravings.

I find that when you do have one, don't do anything else. Hold the smoke in a different way so you can see it.
Concentrate on the taste, don't have your coffee or tea with it, you don't get to appreciate the full taste of the smoke.
Don't have a conversation, don't read (other than this book, at certain smoking exercises) don't think of anything else but that smoke
Best Wishes,
Ben
 

Springroll

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OR, I was told there are vitamins and such that are an important part of the detox afterwards.

 

Redeye

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I used Zyban to quit after 9 years and it worked like a charm for me - but I do remember having some really weird dreams and so on.  It's definitely not for everyone, and if you're going to go on it make sure people close to you know because they'll probably be the ones who will notice if you start really acting strange.

A good friend of mine used hypnosis.  I was skeptical because he smoked so much - but it worked perfectly for him, he's about a year off smoking now and says he doesn't miss it.

The thing I had to keep reminding myself at first was that it was going to get better - I was miserable at times in the process but it does get easier as you go along.  Eventually you'll start to feel a heck of a lot better in general and it just all fades away.
 

Old Ranger

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Zyban/Welbutrin

First three days of that was like half my brain was going turtle speed and the other half was going mach chicken.
Was interesting learning to regulate myself just to walk a straight line.

I'm hoping to hit the range soon with some 9mm to distract any urges ;D thanks Redeye :salute:
 

Redeye

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Glock therapy - you could write a book on it...  It's all polished up and ready to go for you.  I just have to get a box to pack it all up in for you...
 

Old Ranger

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Crappy...Got to try again....I'm am doing better. I only have to kick one cat a day.
 

Springroll

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Took the plunge on Monday and went for that laser therapy at Imagine Laserworks Inc..
Last smoke was at 08:40, appt at 09:00, been a non-smoker ever since!
It has worked like a charm!

I am not experiencing those physical cravings for them like I did with Zyban. I get that little voice in my head that says "smoke break" but I am have been correcting that with a "gum break". No withdrawl symptoms either. I am on their detox program which basically consists of liquid Magnesium, Vitamin C tabs, Chlorophyll tab's and a mixture of citric juice and cream or tartar. The Cream of Tartar binds to the nicotine, making it easier and faster to rid your body of it. Only complaint is that my sleep is kind of lacking and all over the place, other then that I feel great.

Best $300 gift my bf could have bought me for my birthday...seriously!

 

Bruce Monkhouse

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I found this interesting, I wonder what commercials we will be looking at in 25 years and saying " You've got to be kidding me?"

http://www.canoe.ca/Travel/Microgalleries/smokingads/home.html?&pic=0
 

Fusaki

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I've got to give a strong endorsement for Champix.

I got it free through the PSP Butt Out Program after a friend recommended it to me. I told the PSP people that after trying Nicorette and The Patch (years ago, outside of the Butt Out Program), I felt that I had the best shot at quitting with Champix.

I took Champix as directed by the doc for just under 3 weeks (the program can be up to 12 weeks, if you feel like you need it). I haven't had a smoke since the last week of August. The first few days of quitting still sucked, but the Champix took the edge off. I broke and had a smoke at once point, but it just felt gross and I got nothing out of it. After that, I realized that I'd just have to suck it up and wait for the cravings to pass because smoking cigarettes when you've been on Champix for a week and a half just isn't fun at all.

So, here I am. Havn't smoked in just over a month. I still get cravings - especially in the field - but it's tolerable. I figure it'll be a few years before they're totally gone. My next goal to quitting is going an entire tour without smoking.
 

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I quit monday. I was smoking pretty hard in Afghanistan from stress and boredom, and when I got back I smoked even more out of deeper boredom. I decided to take a vacation to Patagonia and there will be some high altitude treks and I figure I need my lungs at full capacity for that! I got my nicoderm courtesy of the Army. I haven't broken down and had a smoke yet, but I almost put the phone through a wall when I was on hold for 5 minutes, so I think the TV commericals with the flight attendant are horsesh!t. I might have a smoke or two on Nov 11th...
 
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