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Remains found at Kamloops residential school 'not an isolated incident,' Indigenous experts and leaders warn

Brad Sallows

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The confusion over Remembrance Day may be that it is federally (as in, federal employees) observed, but not required for federally-regulated companies. Some provinces choose to apply it, and some do not.
 

Colin Parkinson

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To bad this story didn't break before the election or during it


While Jean Chrétien was minister of Indian affairs, his federal department received several reports — including one addressed directly to him — of mistreatment and physical abuse of children at residential schools, government records show.

Chrétien, Canada's prime minister from 1993 to 2003, told a popular Radio-Canada talk show on Sunday that he never heard about abuse at residential schools while he was minister of what was then called the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development from 1968 to 1974.

Jean Chrétien says he never heard about abuse in residential schools while he was minister
A cursory look at the historical record reveals that while Chrétien was minister, his department received at least four reports outlining allegations of abuse and mistreatment of children at St. Anne's Indian Residential School, which operated in the Fort Albany First Nation, along Ontario's James Bay coast.

The department also received reports of abuse from other residential schools during his tenure, including two from one that sat about 130 kilometres north of his hometown of Shawinigan, Que., records show.
 

daftandbarmy

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To bad this story didn't break before the election or during it


While Jean Chrétien was minister of Indian affairs, his federal department received several reports — including one addressed directly to him — of mistreatment and physical abuse of children at residential schools, government records show.

Chrétien, Canada's prime minister from 1993 to 2003, told a popular Radio-Canada talk show on Sunday that he never heard about abuse at residential schools while he was minister of what was then called the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development from 1968 to 1974.

Jean Chrétien says he never heard about abuse in residential schools while he was minister
A cursory look at the historical record reveals that while Chrétien was minister, his department received at least four reports outlining allegations of abuse and mistreatment of children at St. Anne's Indian Residential School, which operated in the Fort Albany First Nation, along Ontario's James Bay coast.

The department also received reports of abuse from other residential schools during his tenure, including two from one that sat about 130 kilometres north of his hometown of Shawinigan, Que., records show.

witch hunt halloween GIF by W Network
 

Navy_Pete

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The confusion over Remembrance Day may be that it is federally (as in, federal employees) observed, but not required for federally-regulated companies. Some provinces choose to apply it, and some do not.
I'm actually a fan of this model, means the kids are in school and can do the observations there and actually learn something, so probably a good model for the TRC day. Not sure what schools are teaching now, but when I was a kid there was this weird empty potemkin village with a long house and whatnot where we learned about the First Nations like it was a historical thing, as opposed to there being a lot of reservations in the area and active residential schools.

Still blown away the last one close in 1996; the whole system caused generations of trauma.
 

Maxman1

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the last one close in 1996

Well, sort of. The last one to be operated, in any capacity, as a school, Marivelle, stopped operating as a residential school in the 70s and became a day school, and was turned over to the band in 1987, who continued using it as a day school until 1996.
 

Maxman1

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In similar news:
"Where did they go?" No human remains found on Charles Camsell hospital grounds

Nothing has been found after two more days of searching for unmarked graves at the site of a former “Indian hospital” in central Edmonton.

Crews completed the last of 34 excavations on the Charles Camsell Hospital grounds Friday - after ground-penetrating radar pointed to “anomalies” under the soil.

“We’re happy that nothing has been found here to date,” Papaschase Elder Fernie Marty said.

“No bodies, no bones of any kind, no human remains, so that’s a good thing. Now to find where the bodies did go to. Where did they go?”

Marty said he still believes there are unmarked graves somewhere in or around Edmonton.

He bases that off of stories he’s heard about people disappearing and accounts from former staff members he’s spoken to directly about things that happened in the hospital.

“A lot of evil stuff went on here. This place, in my opinion, should have been burned to the ground or blown up,” he said.

“You couldn’t give me a place to live here. I wouldn’t live here. Too much horror went on.”

The hospital building is now being converted to condos, owned by local architect Gene Dub.

Dub paid more than $200,000 for the search.

“I think we owe it to those families to search these grounds,” Dub said. “To find, truthfully whether they’re here.”

“His heart is in a good place,” Marty said of Dub, adding plans to add a commemorative stone to the property were appreciated by him and other Elders.

Starting in the 1930s, 31 hospitals were built in Canada with the goal of treating tuberculosis in Indigenous people - but according to the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre at the University of British Columbia, the hospitals were understaffed and used “experimental treatment” on their patients.

A class-action lawsuit brought forth in 2018 alleges patients suffered sexual and physical abuse, including forced sterilization, at these hospitals.

The Indigenous groups involved in the Camsell search said they will continue to seek answers - and possibly search other sites in the Edmonton area.
 

The Bread Guy

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Interesting take on the half-staff flags from an interesting group ...
Ray Deer answered the phone on a late October day and heard the news that Bo Curotte, a Vietnam War veteran, had succumbed to cancer. Deer is president of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 219 in Kahnawake Mohawk territory, and such phone calls are an ever more regular occurrence.

(...)

... understanding that a tribute needs to be paid to each departed veteran is one of the reasons Deer and the Kahnawake elders resolved that after keeping the flags at half-mast for a 30-day mourning period in the wake of the discovery of 215 unmarked graves at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School in British Columbia, it was time to raise them back up again.

“We didn’t want to have the flags lowered forever,” Deer said. “Quebec and Canada have never told us, as Mohawks, what to do, and so we put the flag back up when we felt it was the right time.”

(...)

Together with poppies, two minutes of silence, the laying of wreaths and the playing of the Last Post, lowering the national flag to half-mast at sunrise and keeping it there until sunset is an integral part of remembering.

“The rituals are crucial,” retired Gen. Rick Hillier said. “They are part of how we learn, and how we remember.”

But if the flag’s already at half-mast, the ritual can’t be performed, which would be unforgivable, Hillier said. Such was the former chief of the defence staff and Afghanistan veteran’s dismay that he pulled his car over to the side of the road while en route from the capital region to Montebello, Que., to say his soldier’s piece about what is shaping up to be a Remembrance Day fight over the flag.

“You can’t lower the flag on Nov. 11 unless you raise it,” he said. “We are past our best-sell-by date on this, and it is time to put the flags back to full-mast.” ...
 
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