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What’s in a Soldier? How to Rebrand the Canadian Armed Forces

mariomike

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Who is "they"?
The government. Not going to argue if it is a good idea or not. That subject has already been beaten to death on here. Just have to wait till the next World War to find out if "they" will bring it back again.
 

brihard

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The government. Not going to argue if it is a good idea or not. That subject has already been beaten to death on here. Just have to wait till the next World War to find out if "they" will bring it back again.
If there's a next world war that gets that desperate, it will probably be over far too quick for a levee en masse to be of any use.
 

daftandbarmy

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If there's a next world war that gets that desperate, it will probably be over far too quick for a levee en masse to be of any use.

I recall that the Norwegians said they could mobilize about 1 million troops in four days, out of a total population of just over 4 million. As a result, their 'Home Guard' units, units raised locally to defend key points like bridges, were provided with about 4 days of Csups to hold in place.

The primary role of the 'Levee en Masse'/ conscription is to be able to respond quickly. Having said that, like any such mobilization program, it needs to be properly maintained and supported to be of any use, which can be really expensive.
 

MilEME09

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I recall that the Norwegians said they could mobilize about 1 million troops in four days, out of a total population of just over 4 million. As a result, their 'Home Guard' units, units raised locally to defend key points like bridges, were provided with about 4 days of Csups to hold in place.

The primary role of the 'Levee en Masse'/ conscription is to be able to respond quickly. Having said that, like any such mobilization program, it needs to be properly maintained and supported to be of any use, which can be really expensive.
In a way you could do something like that here but a focus on domestic tasks, with expeditionary as a secondary role. Example Blairmore used to have a RCEME platoon and a recovery platoon a long long time ago. Given its location, and if you equipped it correctly, a recovery platoon in the mountain passes to respond quickly to crashes involving big rigs would be interesting. Would require a level of assumed risk you don't see these days though.
 

mariomike

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Having said that, like any such mobilization program, it needs to be properly maintained and supported to be of any use, which can be really expensive.
Really expensive. And unpopular, with some.

The US government has had a draft in six conflicts. I'm old enough to remember their last one. Vietnam-era "draft dodgers" coming to Canada. And, seeing young men on TV burn their draft cards in Washington while chanting "Hell no - we won't go!". As well as reading of some purposely failing the medical, and recruiting process to avoid the draft.

Or taking an "Easy out". ie: A Bad Conduct Discharge ( BCD ).

There were also what were described as "handcuff volunteers". Men who volunteered to serve in other branches, rather than wait to get drafted into the infantry. eg: Gene Autry knew he would soon be drafted during the war. He said, "I didn't want to be drafted into the infantry."

So, he volunteered for the Air Corps.

In spite of the expense and unpopularity, the US draft ran non-stop from 1940 to 1973. They even got Elvis in the late 1950's.

Of course, it's always preferable for military vacancies to be filled by volunteers.
 
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daftandbarmy

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In a way you could do something like that here but a focus on domestic tasks, with expeditionary as a secondary role. Example Blairmore used to have a RCEME platoon and a recovery platoon a long long time ago. Given its location, and if you equipped it correctly, a recovery platoon in the mountain passes to respond quickly to crashes involving big rigs would be interesting. Would require a level of assumed risk you don't see these days though.

I seem to remember that the Home Guard units in Denmark and Norway were about a large platoon in size and were commanded by a Reg F Pl HQ. They trained regularly, including the guy who was OIC Nuclear Demolition Charges for the big bridges who also happened to be a truck driver.

I think they were grouped in companies and battalions regionally, anchored on the key points they were responsible for. They kept their personal weapons and ammo at home. Being fully 'Woke' to the cause of national survival, these were gender balanced fighting units!

Again, a big resource drain - but it makes sense if you're expecting 5 x Soviet Airborne Divisions to drop in for lunch unannounced.

And I know Blairmore really well, my in-laws being from there. The locals are so heavily armed I don't think it would be possible for the CAF to outgun them :)
 

Brad Sallows

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Canada has never really had an effective capability to mobilize quickly. It takes time to work up formations that can be risked in battle.
 

rmc_wannabe

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Canada has never really had an effective capability to mobilize quickly. It takes time to work up formations that can be risked in battle.


Expeditionally, we have punched above our weight time and time again when we work in a coalition and have the lead time to prepare an expeditionary force (from the Boer War to fighting ISIS).

Domestically, we have failed miserably in protecting ourselves from incursions (Be it Fenians, drug smugglers, or Russian Tu-95s ). This goes to a belief, colonial in nature, that someone else will take care of it. Canadian society has no appetite to be a military deterrent because is takes money and effort better put towards bettering our comfortable lifestyle. We build on additions to the house without raising our insurance coverage.

Canada has become the modern day equivalent of 1938 Poland; our domestic defense capability is undermanned, underequipped, and reliant on Treaty Partners coming to save us. We saw how well that worked out in the past...
 

daftandbarmy

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Expeditionally, we have punched above our weight time and time again when we work in a coalition and have the lead time to prepare an expeditionary force (from the Boer War to fighting ISIS).

Domestically, we have failed miserably in protecting ourselves from incursions (Be it Fenians, drug smugglers, or Russian Tu-95s ). This goes to a belief, colonial in nature, that someone else will take care of it. Canadian society has no appetite to be a military deterrent because is takes money and effort better put towards bettering our comfortable lifestyle. We build on additions to the house without raising our insurance coverage.

Canada has become the modern day equivalent of 1938 Poland;
our domestic defense capability is undermanned, underequipped, and reliant on Treaty Partners coming to save us. We saw how well that worked out in the past...

Except we're surrounded by either friendly countries or gigantic Oceans.
 

MilEME09

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Except we're surrounded by either friendly countries or gigantic Oceans.
Oceans aren't the great barriers they once were. Not when a hyper sonic cruise missile can be fired from archangel and strike parliament Hill if they wanted to.
 

Kilted

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I seem to remember that the Home Guard units in Denmark and Norway were about a large platoon in size and were commanded by a Reg F Pl HQ. They trained regularly, including the guy who was OIC Nuclear Demolition Charges for the big bridges who also happened to be a truck driver.

I think they were grouped in companies and battalions regionally, anchored on the key points they were responsible for. They kept their personal weapons and ammo at home. Being fully 'Woke' to the cause of national survival, these were gender balanced fighting units!

Again, a big resource drain - but it makes sense if you're expecting 5 x Soviet Airborne Divisions to drop in for lunch unannounced.

And I know Blairmore really well, my in-laws being from there. The locals are so heavily armed I don't think it would be possible for the CAF to outgun them :)
I remember working with a Dane that explained that he was a Sgt in the regular army and an officer in the home guard. Apparently you can independently be a member of both at the same time.
 

CBH99

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In a way you could do something like that here but a focus on domestic tasks, with expeditionary as a secondary role. Example Blairmore used to have a RCEME platoon and a recovery platoon a long long time ago. Given its location, and if you equipped it correctly, a recovery platoon in the mountain passes to respond quickly to crashes involving big rigs would be interesting. Would require a level of assumed risk you don't see these days though.
The way the reserves are currently structured, and where units are located, that's almost exactly what we have already.

Extra manpower & some big vehicles to assist in domestic operations, expeditionary being a secondary role (albeit trained for as in primary role)
 
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