Author Topic: RTs in Military  (Read 9430 times)

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Offline CMart

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RTs in Military
« on: November 04, 2012, 20:03:29 »
Hello All
Just trying to find out if there is anyone else out there that is a practicing RT (Respiratory Therapist) as well
as a member of the Canadian Forces.
I am an RT at St Michael's Hospital in Toronto. I have also been a member of the military
reserve for over 14 years. I am trying to put together a proposal to get RTs recognized
in the military, via a PRL MOC.
Let me know if you are out there.
Thanks

Offline Rider Pride

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Re: RTs in Military
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2012, 22:26:50 »
You should be.

As a sub-trade of Med Tech 334, just as PMed, OR Tech and others are.

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Offline ModlrMike

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Re: RTs in Military
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2012, 22:28:49 »
You should be.

As a sub-trade of Med Tech 334, just as PMed, OR Tech and others are.

 :brit poppy:

They can't get PAs recognized. What makes you think they're going to do any better for anyone else. Not that they shouldn't, just that I don't have any faith in them doing so.
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Online Blackadder1916

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Re: RTs in Military
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2012, 00:00:05 »
. . . . .  I am trying to put together a proposal to get RTs recognized
in the military, via a PRL MOC. . . .


I wouldn't hold your breath.  To establish a new MOC there must be a requirement to have positions that could only be filled by military members.  It has been a few decades since I had any interaction with RTs in military hospitals (when we had separate military hospitals) but the question has been raised before.  At that time (the 1980s), I seem to recollect that there was only one full-time RT in our largest hospital (NDMC) and a couple of part-time on-call positions (all civilians).  I fairly confident the other CFHs (well, I'm not sure about Halifax) didn't employ even civilian RTs.

Back then in the stone age, there were some stirrings about establishing Respiratory Therapist as a trade specialty of Med A (in the same manner as Optho Tech and Med Eqpt Repair before that became a separate trade).  It didn't get far because there was limited (if any) need for such skills on deployed operations (or even in the typical primary care facilities that is the major focus of the CFMS) that couldn't be provided by existing medical tradesmen.

Edited to add

The background I provided above deals with my experience as it concerns the Reg F.  Unless things have changed (I've been retired for a while), it is likely that "Respiratory" is still a sub-occupation for Medical Assistants Technicians in the mobilization occupation structure.  I've included some extracts from what is now either a superceded or very heavily amended publication (A-PD-055-001/AG-001, Canadian Forces Manual of Military Occupational Structure - my copy on disk dates from 1996) that will explain the differences among Mob, PRes, and Reg F occupations as well as a list of the mobilization sub-occupations for Med As.

Quote
213. SPECIAL FORCE (MOBILIZATION) OCCUPATIONAL STRUCTURE

 1.   As authorized in the National Defence Act, the Governor in Council may
 establish a Special Force (Mobilization) in an emergency, or if considered
 desirable by the Canadian Government. It may consist of:

      a.   Officers and NCM of the Reg F;

      b.   Officers and NCM of the Reserve Force (Res F); and

      c.   Officers and NCM not of the Reg F or Res F who are enroled for
           continuing, full-time military service.

 2.   The Special Force (Mobilization) Occupational Structure is:

      a.   the criteria for manning CF war establishments;

      b.   the mechanism for controlling and managing personnel during all phases
           of mobilization; and

      c.   the template to build the PRes and Reg F occupational structures.

 3.   Members will be enrolled, selected, trained and assigned to do a specific job
 for the duration of the emergency or war based on the principle of one member-one
 job. In mobilization or other emergency, operational requirements take priority
 over career concerns normally associated with PRes and Reg F personnel management.

 214. PRES OCCUPATIONAL STRUCTURE

 1.   The PRes is a sub-component of the Reserve Force (Res F) and consists of
 members who have undertaken to perform, whether on active service or not, such
 duty and training as may be required of them. The primary role of the Res F is
 augmentation and sustainment for Reg F Units. The occupational structure of the
 PRes is shown at Annexes A and B to this chapter. This occupational structure
 indicates that PRes personnel are not trained to the full scope of performance
 requirements, and do not have access to the assignment opportunities, of their Reg
 F counterparts. Adhering to the principle of operational effectiveness, PRes
 occupations must be structured in such a way as to be able to carry out at least
 one complete Special Force (Mobilization) job. These PRes occupations must also be
 structured to provide reasonable career opportunities for reservists with due
 consideration to their unique employment constraints.

 215. REG F OCCUPATIONAL STRUCTURE

 1.   The Reg F consists of Officers and NCM who are enroled for continuing full-
 time military service. To satisfy the manning requirements of a full-time
 professional military force, effective personnel management is necessary to
 provide those who develop and demonstrate the motivation, experience and
 potential, an opportunity to achieve greater skills and to accept more demanding
 responsibilities. The Reg F occupational structure is characterized by initial
 exposure to an occupation, and the acquisition of experience and new skills that
 can provide opportunities for personnel to develop and advance in accordance with
 CF operational needs and individual abilities. The Reg F occupational structure is
 shown at Annexes A and B to this chapter.


 710   MEDICAL              MEDICAL ASSISTANT                                     
                      M711B OPERATIONAL SUPPORT SEA       
                      M711C OPERATIONAL LAND SUPPORT     
                      M711D HOSPITAL                     
                      M711E CASUALTY AIDE               
                      M711F HEALTH RECORDS             
                      M711G RESPIRATORY                   
                      M711H OPTHAMALIC                                 
                      M711I ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC 
                      M711J ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC                         
                      M711K MEDICAL STORES               
                      M711L MEDICAL EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE                   

Mobilization occupations exist only as a paper structure, there is no tracking (or at least there wasn't in the past) of qualifications held by currently serving members as to whether they would fit into one of the mobilization occupations.  If you are planning on proceeding with your task, my suggestion is to review this publication (or whatever superceded it) as it will outline the steps required to change or add a military occupation.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2012, 12:27:00 by Blackadder1916 »
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Offline CMart

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Re: RTs in Military
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2012, 09:56:48 »
Thanks for the info. It provides alot of insight of how things could proceed...or not.

Offline MedCorps

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Re: RTs in Military
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2012, 08:40:04 »
The addition of an RT occupation / sub occupation was examined not that long ago.  Med Techs are about to undergo a restructuring, so I am guessing this is why it was being looked at. Some other civilian occupations were also examined and it does not look like any expansion will occur.  When you think about this it makes sense as it is bad fiscal times to attempt any expansion in the CF. I am told though that you will see some restructuring over the next few years, this will affect the Med Tech sub-occupations (PMed / OR Tech / Aeromed Tech / PA).

The proposal to add RTs was not accepted as an option for a number of reasons.  The solution (because many of the RT skills are useful for the military, especially in a role 3 environment) was to increase the RT-centric training of the Critical Care Nursing Officers (and to a lesser degree the General Duty Nursing Officers and Operating Room Nursing Officers).  You should see CCNOs (and maybe others) doing rotations with RTs in large civilian hospitals to increase their competency in RT areas of expertise.  Although it has been done for sometime, it will be now a little more formal and better controlled.  These rotations will not only be pre-deployment training (as was done in the past?) but will occupy some of the time of the NOs in the 1 Cdn Fd Hosp High Readiness Detachments.

I am not sure if NO's will be coming to St Micheal's hospital in Toronto.  If you are interested in mentoring / partnering with a Nursing Officer in your attractive civilian clinical setting and sharing your knowledge I would encourage you to identify this to you Fd Amb / PRL CoC. You experience, coupled with time in the military I am sure would be most welcome. If you get no joy from your CoC shoot me a PM and I will send you the e-mail address of the Senior Practice Leader for CCNOs who might be a little more interested. 

MC

Offline ModlrMike

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Re: RTs in Military
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2012, 08:57:00 »
I would have thought that the RT scope had more in common with PA than NO. Certainly as an ER PA there are substantial commonalities.
WARNING: The consumption of alcohol may create the illusion that you are tougher,smarter, faster and better looking than most people.
Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit upon his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats. (H.L. Mencken 1919)
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