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Canadian Decoration: C.D. [Merged]

V

Veteran`s son

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Hello

When post-nominal letters and regiment abbreviations are listed after someone‘s name, which one comes first?

For example, my Dad earned the Canadian Forces Decoration and served with the Royal Canadian Engineers.

Would the abbreviations be CD, RCE or would they be reversed? Also, does there have to be periods between the C and D?

Again, your replies would be appreciated!
 

Spr.Earl

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Vet‘s Son,
All award‘s come first like in your father‘s case
it would be Rank,Name,C.D. R.C.E.

The C.D. is conciderd as an award like the V.C. and all other award‘s.

C.D.,(twelve year‘s of undetected crime LOL)
is a good conduct medal.

If your father had won the V.C. it would be,
Rank,name ,V.C.,C.D.,R.C.E.
Award‘s go by rank,V.C. being the highest.

Like mine is Spr.Earl,C.D.,C.M.E.
(Canadian Military Engineers)

But campaign medal‘s are not put after your name.

Hope‘s this help‘s.

Can anyone post the Canadian Medal list to help
Vet‘s Son?
 

portcullisguy

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According to the Dept of Canadian Heritage, post-nominals are used in certain situations to denote Crown honours, awards, medals and official appointments.

Post-nominals have a specific order or precedence, and it is also not always appropriate to use all of them, depending on your audience or situation.

For example, if you have a PhD and a Bachelor‘s degree, you normally just put "PhD" and not "PhD, BA" following your name.

Generally, the highest-ranking awards come first after the name, unless the courtesy title "Esq." is used. In that case, the post-nominals follow the courtesy title.

A British book, "Debrett‘s Correct Form", sets out the custom used in Britain and the Commonwealth for the use of post-nominal letters. It includes both civil and military use, and styles of address, etc., for people of different rank and precedence. The custom is similar in Canada, except that we have our own precedence because we have our own honours and awards, which do not include or recognize knighthoods.

The general ranking of letters after the name are as follows:

1. Orders and decorations conferred by the Crown.

2. Appointments to Crown offices, such as Privy Councellor (PC), and Aide de Camp (AdC).

3. Law appointments: Queen‘s Counsel (QC), Justice of the Peace (JP).

4. University degrees.

5. Religious orders, then medical qualifications.

6. Fellowships of learned societies, fellowships/memberships to professional institutions, and Writers to the Signet (WS).

7. Members of Parliament (MP) and Members of a Legislative Assembly (MLA) or Provincial Parliament (MPP).

8. Membership in one of the armed forces corps (RCAC, REME, etc).

All of these letters follow "Esq." if used. If the person is a Baronet, they follow "Bt." if used.

The precedence of the orders is set by CF regulation. The Canadian Forces Decoration (CD) is one of the last ones in the order of precedence. The Order of Canada had three ranks and it is the most senior Canadian order. Companion, the highest rank (CC), follows immediately after the VC and GC, unless the holder is a Companion of another more senior order (CH, CB, CSI, CMG), which isn‘t likely in Canada.

Check the DND website for the ranking of military honours.

Not all honours include post-nominals.

One thing I noticed is here in Canada, some people use "MID" as a post-nominal, to indicate a mention-in-despatches. This is actually incorrect. There is no post-nominal for this.
 
V

Veteran`s son

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portcullisguy & Spr. Earl

Thank you for your responses to my question as it was most helpful!
 

Spr.Earl

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So Port,that mean‘s I can‘t put V.D. after my name now? Ahhhh!
 

Michael Dorosh

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Don‘t laugh, Spr. Earl, the Volunteer Decoration (VD) was actually awarded before it was replaced by the CD just before the Korean War. I wonder if it was as funny then as it is to us now?
 

Danjanou

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****, Michael beat me to it (again).

I remember the first time I saw that(VD)on a list of orders and decoration and though it must be a typo.
 

Spr.Earl

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Touche Sir Micheal,
There‘s me being a smart arse.

I salute you.

Oh quetion,what come‘s first the C.D. or the Jubliee medal?
 
M

MG34

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Everything goes before the CD even that idiotic CPSM.The CD is the lowest ranked decoration and it should be it is a gimmie medal like the Jubilee medals and 125 medal more wasted money so the PONTIs(Person of no tactical importance) could have gongs as well.
 

Recce41

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The JM, CD, 125 mybe give aways but are decorations. In the Boar War, WW1/2, the had give aways, Volunteer medal etc. In Britian they have theirs also. The Commandwealth Service, Volunteer Serve, etc. We can wear the Commandwealth servise, but no one here would allow it. The US is the worst for give MEs.
In the begining, every soldier was to receive the following, turn of Cent medal 1900, Kings Medal, Queens Cor, Queens 25, Queens Jub, 125, Centenial 67, and some that never came about, Cent 2000, Noble Peace, NATO Service.
Here at the Armour School we have loosers, with just the CD. Its funny, when them wine and cry. But tell them how can you go on tour, if your scared to go to the Regt.

:evil: :tank:
 
V

Veteran`s son

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Do most people who have earned the Canadian Forces Decoration use the post-nominal letters(CD) after their name? :salute:
 

Michael Dorosh

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I for one take great pride in my "gimme" medal; no one gave it to me, I earned it with 12 years service and good conduct. And I do put CD after my name in formal correspondence. I include it with my name on my book covers and I have it on the name plate outside my office at my civvie job.

Matters not, most people don‘t have a clue what it means, which is ok. Surely 12 years service, even in the Reserve force, is as prestigious if not more than a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology or Humanities, which also comes with a post-nominal representing four years of sleeping in a classroom.
 
V

Veteran`s son

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Michael

I think that it is great that you list the post-nominals(CD)after your name! :)
You must be very proud to have earned this medal!
 
V

Veteran`s son

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Am I correct in understanding that since my Dad served in the RCE, he was entitled to have that abbreviation after his name?

Does that apply only to CF members who are currently serving?

Also, are there any other medals such as the SSM that are being considered for the use of post-nominal letters?
 

The_Falcon

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If you the complete list of Canadian Medals and Honours, go to http://www.gg.ca/honours/ordprec_e.asp
This is the complete list of honours and decorations that can be awarded to Canadians, also it indicates which awards include the right to use post nominal letters and they are in order of precedence (a CD is not the lowest). The DND list is incomplete, they even state on the DND site that they only list medals commonly awarded to military members, but all military members can wear the non-DND listed awards if they have earned them. They may raise eyebrows though. On member of my unit was awarded the Ontario Police Bravery Medal, and the Sr NCO flipped cause they didn‘t what it was. I myself in a few years time will have earned the "Service Medal of the Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem" and probably also a grade of "The Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem". Both will get me noticed though
 

nbpcp

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This is a very old post but I needed to post after reading it.  I was wondering, are military and civil decorations and commendation post nominals, V.C., M.B., C.C. etc, held in the same regard as say regular educational/vocational post nominals like M.D., P.T. or B.A. etc.  Do post-nominals being issued by the Canadian Government as opposed to ones being issued by a College of Nurses for example or Physicians, have any added privileges, or be recognized in a different manner by the government?
 

1feral1

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Knew an old soldier once that had these - CD, VD Clap, and Scar (and its not me  ;D)

Ha!

With the five gongs I have, the only P-N is the CD, which I do use here but not very often.

Cheers,

Wes
 

Steve031

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In the modern Canadian Forces, the use of post-nominal letters to identify branch, corps or regiment is no longer in style.  In fact, I believe it is not even authorized.  Following the unification of the army, the RCN and the RCAF into the CAF, there was no longer a reason for post-nominal letters to denote what service a person belonged to.  Up until that point, it was necessary for a Lt. in the RCN to have post-nominals to distinguish himself from a subaltern in the army.  With the creation of the ranks of Lt (N) and Capt (N), this was no longer necessary.  So, for a modern officer to add post-nominals to their name signifying their branch would be highly unusual.

Since your father was a member of the RCE, he WAS in the army before unification and thus is from a period when such post-nominals were fashionable.  However, since your father was a member of the other ranks, he would not have been entitled to use them.  An example of a person who would use such post-nominals is:  Capt John Smith PPCLI  An example of a retired person who would use them could be:  Mr. Joseph Bloggins  RCEME (ret.)  In this case, the officer was a subaltern when he retired.
 
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