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Medical Release ( merged )

dogger1936

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Hey folks.

I am currently being "sent away" to a static position of my choice to basically start the process of getting out. While it was once something  I was really trying to avoid; I've decided it is both best for the CF and my family and I. I will be medically released if all goes well with 14 years in, 5 of those being a Sgt making around 61,000 a year.

Family planning is my biggest concern. Looking at the big picture in the future along with my wife will hopefully put us in a secure position to raise our children and provide the best life we can for them IRT my disability and limitations. Working after release doesn't seem to be an option for me, and honestly my wife has a full time job looking after her three kids unfortunately (one being myself).

I've checked over this board a million times and have spent at least two hours tonight (on a Friday non the less!) searching out the boards here as well as VAC/DND sites to find answers; to which most were broken links or outdated information.

I'm hoping some of you SME's and people who have a working brain (unlike myself) can help me out with a few questions. While I realise there is no substitute for a scan brief or face to face with a release clerk I have not been able to do this as of yet. And am currently trying to plan as adults with my wife.

Here are a few:

1. released not able to work money is a concern. What would my military pension be every month for a 5 year Sgt making around 61,000 a year?

2. Can someone explain Indexed to me? I keep seeing indexted and believe it mean every year up till my 20 year mark it will increase by 2% annually? leaving me at 20 years with my full pension  I would have received?

3. I keep hearing about VAC not allowing my pay to drop below a certain point if  I cannot work. Can someone verify that?

4. I read somewhere in which I cannot find the reference that if your disabled 48% your children will receive free university. Is this true? And if so is it a combination of injuries which add up to 48% (i.e PTSD 30 % other injuries 18% for example only?)

If the answers to any of these questions are present on the board I apologise, however I believe I have done a detailed search.

To state the obvious I was injured under the new veterans charter in Afghanistan, if there is any confusion.

I thank you in advance for helping my family  and myself who honestly is beginning to feel I can't aid myself most times.

All the best.
 

the 48th regulator

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Crikey Dogger,

I wish you asked these questions earlier today... :)

When I get to work Monday, at the IPSC, I will see if I can get some answers for you.

dileas

tess
 

mariomike

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dogger1936 said:
2. Can someone explain Indexed to me? I keep seeing indexted and believe it mean every year up till my 20 year mark it will increase by 2% annually? leaving me at 20 years with my full pension  I would have received?

"Indexing (Inflation Protection)":
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/hr-rh/bp-rasp/pensions/pensionfacts-infopensions/indexing-indexation-eng.asp
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/hr-rh/bp-rasp/pensions/faq-eng.asp
 

medicineman

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To find out what your CF Pension would be, talk to a Release Clerk - they can sit down and do your pension forecast for you, and give you info on other release entitlements.

MM
 

Biohazardxj

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14 x 2 %= 28, 28% of $61000 =  $17080 (gross).  Less any penalties (if there are any) for not completing 20 years. 

This if a rough approximation.  As some one said earlier, go see a release clerk.
 

dapaterson

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Your CFSA pension is made up of two parts: a core benefit that's yours forever, and a bridge benefit to age 65 - but this bridge benefit is lost if you receive a CPP disability benefit.  The core benefit is about 1.5% per year of service; the bridge benefit is about 0.5% per year of service.

So, if the average of your best five years of service is $61000 and you are medically released with 14 years of service (even one day less will cost you!) you would get:

1.5% per year * 14 years = 21% of $61000 per year or $12810 per year in the core benefit, plus another $4270 per year up to age 65 (0.5% per year *14 years = 7% of $61000).  These amounts have be adjusted somewhat in recent years - the total is still 2% of pay, but the core amount you retain has been increased, and the age 65 reduction has been cut back.  I don't have the precise figures handy, but you should be able to use those figures as a rough guide.  They also vary depending on how much of your earnings were above the CPP maximum earnings.

Indexing means annual increases to account for inflation; it's als known as cost-of-living increases.  If you are medically released, this begins automatically; otherwise you would have to wait until your age plus your years of service was greater than or equal to 85 (for example, age 60 with 25 years of service). 

In addition, as this would be a medical release of a member with more than 10 years of service, you'd receive an immediate unreduced annuity - no penalties due to age or early release.

This is only the CFSA pension (the one you pay into on every pay cheque).  VAC benefits are not included in this.

Much more information on CFSA pensions is available at: http://www.cmp-cpm.forces.gc.ca/dgcb-dgras/ps/pen/reg/ap-ar/benefits-prestati-eng.asp and http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/forces-pensions/txt/faq-eng.html


For other benefits, there is information available at your local BPSO and at the local IPSC. 
 

dogger1936

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thank you very much guys. And yes  I totally agree a release clerk is the way to go. Im good friends with our cheif clerk and Im sure he can send me to see someone great over there.

DA thanks a bunch for the explination, however I think it would be 28% as the RMS has stated no? 20 % for 10 years 2% a year? Ihave no idea thats why I'm asking!! thanks for the links.
 

dogger1936

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the 48th regulator said:
Crikey Dogger,

I wish you asked these questions earlier today... :)

When I get to work Monday, at the IPSC, I will see if I can get some answers for you.

dileas

tess

Thanks man. drop me a pm and we can talk via email from work if you like!
 

dapaterson

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Dogger:  2% a year is the shorthand - the actual details are more complex.  And important to understand.  So 2% per year for 14 years is 28%.  28% of $61K is $17080.  But it's not all for life - there's the CPP reduction that comes in at age 65 or when you receive a CPP disability benefit.  The detailed formula is:

(YMPE = Yearly Maximum Pensionable Earnings for CPP)

1.375% of earnings up to YMPE  + 2% of earnings above YMPE  = lifetime benefit

0.625% of earnings up to YMPE = bridge benefit


It's the bridge benefit that goes away at age 65 or when you receive CPP disability.

At 61K, assuming the current YMPE of $48K:


Lifetime benefit = $48K * 1.375% * 14 years + ($61K-48K)*2% * 14 years = $9240 + $3640 = $12 880

Bridge benefit = $48K * 0.625% * 14 years = $4200 per year

Lifetime $12880 + Bridge $4200 = $17080


Be sure you talk with the pension experts to get a full understanding of what's lifetime and what's bridge benefit, and when the bridge will no longer be paid.
 

the 48th regulator

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This is a guide that will give you an idea how long it will take to be released 3(b) medical.  Please note this is not an official document, nor are timing set in stone.  This gives you a basic idea of what your are entitled to, and who is involved.

dileas

tess
 

OldSolduer

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Thank you! I've seen this before and its about right. It takes a while.
 

farrell486

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Just a general question or two.  I'm looking at leaving the CF and have started the process to try and get released medically but I've hit a road block.  I have a H4 for hearing loss (70 db loss in both ears) and have been accommodated for the past 10 years and according the CF i can't get released medically because of this.  Even though my trade and most CF min requirements for hearing loss is a H3.  I tried the university of service option of not being able to carry out deployments because of hearing aids gives out if they come in contact with water or sweat.  Anyone run into these issues before, myself I've seen people release for hearing loss before and am just wondering is the fact the military have invested 22 years into me maybe playing against me?
 

bison33

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H4 is below any trade minimum. When you were assigned H4, the MO had to recommend H4 and an AR(MEL) carried out by D Med Pol who then made your category permanent. Obviously DMCA, at D Med Pol's recommendation, gave you accommodation or RWOR.  Did you go to an MO and ask for a review and were told no? I cannot find where it says you only get one kick at the cat for a review. It's been a decade, things change.  Go talk to someone at the IPSC and go from there. They have the knowledge and can help you. Hope it all works out.



 

krustyrl

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Am I missing something here.?  You have a PCat for hearing loss and were accomodated for 10 yrs and you are not eligible for a 3b release.?
 

ModlrMike

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I sense a basic misunderstanding of terms is at work here. I wager, from your brief description of events, that you were likely retained without restrictions (RWOR). An accommodation is something completely different. If one is RWOR, they're allowed to stay in, and generally retire or release in the normal fashion... not normally under 3A or 3B. In addition, a medical release is generally not something one seeks, rather it is imposed on a member who fails to meet the medical standard, and can't be retained. Often these folks are accommodated for 1-3 years in order to solidify their pension entitlements.
 

krustyrl

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Check.  Thanks ModlrMike, it was the RWOR that was the curveball for how I read that. 
 

farrell486

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Yes i was wrong in my post I was retained without restrictions (RWOR) even though my catergory is a H4 and i was never placed on a Catergory.  This is what I've been told by the MIR who actually encouraged me to go for a medical release since i wanted to try another career.  I was told to do a medical review as i was told i break universality of service on a few points.  My case worker is looking into it even she's confused.
 

Strike

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It sounds like someone was trying to do you a favour some time ago and that favour is now backfiring.
 
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