Author Topic: Higher education just became a much bigger factor on Navy FITREPs  (Read 655 times)

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Offline OceanBonfire

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The Navy is modifying its fitness reports to require officers to detail an individual’s educational accomplishments and how those pursuits will add to unit efficiency, the service announced.

Senior leadership believes the decision will show "that career-long military learning isn’t only job-related technical or tactical training," and that a commitment to higher education will produce Navy leaders with more refined critical thinking skills, according to a Navy release.

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https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-navy/2020/05/08/higher-education-just-became-a-much-bigger-factor-on-navy-fitreps/

https://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=112886
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Online Ostrozac

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It seems odd to me for the USN to be focusing on higher education at this point. Their recent well-publicized problems have been in the areas of corruption, war crimes, and seamanship — I don’t see a direct connection to why officers spending more time on education, and therefore less with their sailors, would help.

Offline Blackadder1916

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It seems odd to me for the USN to be focusing on higher education at this point. Their recent well-publicized problems have been in the areas of corruption, war crimes, and seamanship — I don’t see a direct connection to why officers spending more time on education, and therefore less with their sailors, would help.

Maybe you can glean some of the USN's thought process by looking at some references.

This is the admin instruction that kicks off the changes to their eval reporting.  NAVADMIN 137/20  https://www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/reference/messages/Documents/NAVADMINS/NAV2020/NAV20137.txt

The references in that navadmin include:

REF B IS SECRETARY OF THE NAVY MEMORANDUM EDUCATION FOR SEAPOWER DECISIONS AND IMMEDIATE ACTIONS. (February 5, 2019) https://www.navy.mil/strategic/E4SSECNAVMemo.pdf

REF C IS CNO FRAGMENTARY ORDER (FRAGO) 01/2019: A DESIGN FOR MAINTAINING MARITIME SUPERIORITY.  https://www.navy.mil/cno/docs/CNO%20FRAGO%20012019.pdf

REF D IS THE EDUCATION FOR SEAPOWER STRATEGY  https://www.navy.mil/strategic/Naval_Education_Strategy.pdf

This isn't some new good idea fairy overnight change.  It was a first step in an initiative that has been several years in development.  It seems that it's not just about more credit being given to individuals (at present officers) who attain higher education credentials but also that leaders (and the organization) will be evaluated on their efforts to encourage and assist subordinates in becoming better educated.


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