Author Topic: Russia's Arctic Militarization (merged)  (Read 50611 times)

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aesop081

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Re: Russia wants to deploy two brigades in the arctic.
« Reply #50 on: July 01, 2011, 14:25:13 »
Perhaps a more credible source:



You second source makes no mention of this :

Quote
Serdyukov noted that the Russian Armed Forces also intended to created similar formations in other Arctic countries, such as Finland, Norway and Sweden.

The above is from the first article you posted.

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Re: Russia wants to deploy two brigades in the arctic.
« Reply #51 on: July 01, 2011, 14:47:32 »
Here reproduced in accordance with the fair dealing provisions of the Copyright Act.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/world/2011-07/01/c_13961385.htm
 

Do the Russians even possess the capabilities to deploy several brigade sized formations in the arctic? Does this mean anything for us?

While it would not be any more of a direct military threat to Canada than currently exists - and even the current direct Russian threat is questionable - it does indicate that Russian politicians are having to play the same game as their western counterparts.  Though Vladimir Putin may enjoy the public spotlight, he probably yearns for the past days when a Soviet Russian leader did not have to worry about the voting public's opinion (not that he seems to worry much about it).  There is much similarity in the current Canadian government making noise about the need of an increased military presence in the North.

(Edited to add)

As for their capability to place two brigades in the arctic - note the two locations mentioned, Murmansk and Arkhangelsk.  If one compared similar Canadian locations in terms of size, facilities and transportation connections, it would be like placing a brigade in Halifax and Quebec City (except the port of Quebec City is not ice free year round).  Oh, there already is a brigade just outside Quebec City.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2011, 15:12:04 by Blackadder1916 »
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Re: Russia wants to deploy two brigades in the arctic.
« Reply #52 on: July 02, 2011, 21:57:45 »
                  Another article on the subject and shared with provisions of The Copyright Act

They have been bickering about a signed agreement by the former Soviet Union of setting up a naval installation in Syria since 1971.          http://forums.army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,100607.0.html  and Syria expects Russia to finally decide on the idea.  Perhaps the Russians see a brighter future in the North.

http://geoplotical.blogspot.com/
Russia has announced it will send two army brigades, including special forces soldiers, to the Arctic to protect its interests in the disputed, oil-rich zone.

Russia, the U.S., Canada, Denmark and Norway have all made claims over parts of the Arctic circle which is believed to hold up to a quarter of the Earth's undiscovered oil and gas.

Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said Russia 'remains open for dialogue' with its polar neighbours, but will 'strongly and persistently' defend its interests in the region.

Russia's defence minister Anatoly Serdyukov said the military will deploy two army brigades which he said could be based in the town of Murmansk close to the border with Norway.

He said his ministry is working out specifics, such as troops numbers, weapons and bases, but a brigade includes a few thousand soldiers.

In May Commander of the Russian Ground Forces Aleksander Postnikov took a three-day long trip to military camps on the Kola Peninsula, next to the borders of Finland and Norway.

A spokesperson for the Russian Defense Ministry said that the first soldiers to be sent would be special forces troops specially equipped and prepared for military warfare in Arctic conditions.

Claim: In 2007 The Russians used a mini submarine to plant their flag and stake a claim on much of the Arctic Ocean floor

The Russians say the establishment of an Arctic brigade is an attempt to 'balance the situation' and point to the fact that the U.S. and Canada are already establishing similar brigades.

Drilling for oil and gas in the Arctic Circle has been made feasible as much of the Sheet ice has melted due to climate change.

 Earlier this month Russia and Norway finally agreed terms on a deal to divide an area of the Barents Sea.

The two countries had been locked in a dispute over the 68,000 square mile area since 1970.

However the agreement does not address one of the Russians' key claims, that a huge undersea mountain range that covers the North Pole, forms part of Russia’s continental shelf and must therefore be considered Russian territory.

The race to secure subsurface rights to the Arctic seabed heated up in 2007 when Russia sent two small submarines to plant a tiny national flag under the North Pole.

Russia argued that the underwater ridge connected their country directly to the North Pole and as such formed part of their territory, a claim which was disputed by other Arctic nations.

The Russian company Rosneft has struck a short-term deal with BP to begin drilling in areas of the far north, even if the future of the marriage business is still not clear.

Oil reservoirs at the Val Gamburtseva oil fields in Russia's Arctic Far North. Russian state oil company Rosneft earlier this year announced a joint venture with BP

Another change brought about by the melting ice in the Arctic Ocean is that it has opened up new sea routes.

The amount of ice in the region continues to decrease each year and many experts predict it will disappear completely by the year 2030.

This week a leading British global security expert predicted that the competition between nations for natural resources will bring about a third world war.

Professor Michael Klare of Hampshire College, believes the next three decades will see powerful corporations at serious risk of going bust, nations fighting for their futures and significant bloodshed.

He said the winners in the race for energy security will get to decide how we live, work and play in future years - with the losers 'cast aside and dismembered'.


He explained: 'The struggle for energy resources is guaranteed to grow ever more intense for a simple reason: there is no way the existing energy system can satisfy the world’s future requirements.'

Offline 57Chevy

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Re: Russia wants to deploy two brigades in the arctic.
« Reply #53 on: July 06, 2011, 17:44:27 »
Russia launches Arctic expedition, beefs up military presence
  Jeff Davis/Postmedia News/July 6, 2011
http://www.canada.com/news/Russia+launches+Arctic+expedition+beefs+military+presence/5060448/story.html#ixzz1RMbFjApl

Highlights mine

A Russian scientific expedition — led by a nuclear-powered icebreaker — has set sail on a mission to solidify Russia's claim to a resource-laden tract of the Arctic seafloor, in a summer that will see intensified military activity in the high Arctic.
 
Russia has also announced it will station two new Arctic warfare brigades north of 60 degrees — a move that will expand Russia's northern military capabilities far beyond those of Canada.
 
The research vessel Academik Fyodorov will conduct a sub-sea mapping exercise of the Lomonosov and Mendeleev ridges in Russia's second mission to determine the boundaries of Russia's Arctic continental shelf.
 
If Russia's claims to these two ridges named for iconic Russian scientists is successful, they will gain more than one million square kilometres of Arctic territory.
 
In 2012, Russia will submit these and other data to a United Nations panel that will decide which nations own which sections of the Arctic seabed. The five Arctic nations — Canada, Denmark, Norway, Russia and the United States — are locked in a tight race to gather evidence to support their claims amid reports that global warming could leave the region ice-free by 2030.
 
"I expect that next year we will present a well-based scientific claim about expanding the borders of our Arctic shelf," Deputy Prime Minister Sergei Ivanov said in the northern town of Naryan-Mar, as the expedition set sail Wednesday.
 
"The expedition is equipped with modern equipment and everything necessary for a proper and scientific claim," he said told Russia's ITAR-TASS news agency.
 
The Arctic seabed is believed to hold 13 per cent of the world's undiscovered oil reserves and 30 per cent of the gas resources yet to be found, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.
 
Russia will do more than conduct mere scientific missions in the Arctic this summer.
 
The Russian military is putting together two brigades of specially trained Arctic troops to protect Russian interests, Russian Defence Minister Anatoly Serdyukov announced on July 1. A brigade typically consists of 3,000 to 5,000 troops.
 
"The general staff is currently drafting plans to establish two such formations. Those plans should take into account deployment sites, armaments, number of servicemen and infrastructure," the defence minister said.
 
The minister said the northern Russian cities of Murmansk or Arkhangelsk are being considered as the bases for the new Arctic warfare units.
 
Also last week, Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin announced plans to build a $33-billion year-round port on the Yamal Peninsula, in the Russian Arctic.
 

While Canada does not have such ambitious plans for infrastructure or military bases in the Arctic, the Canadian Forces will be mounting a large show of force in the Arctic this summer.
 

Operation Nanook is to play out in several phases on and near Baffin Island and Ellesmere Island throughout August, with more than 1,000 Canadian Forces personnel participating. It will involve CF-18 fighter jets as well a surveillance and transport aircraft, a warship, infantry companies from Quebec and Alberta, and 5 Canadian Ranger Patrol Group — Inuit reservists who have broad experience surviving in the extreme environment of the Far North.
 
"It will be the largest operation that has taken place in recent history," Defence Minister Peter MacKay said Saturday in Kandahar, Afghanistan.
 
"All of this is very much about enlarging the footprint and the permanent and seasonal presence we have in the North. It is something that we as a government intend to keep investing in."
 
Piotr Dutkiewicz, a professor of Russian studies at Carleton University, said Russian and Canadian claims to the Arctic seafloor overlap, and tensions stand to increase.
 
"The Canadians are also claiming part of this territory, so I see on the horizon some conflicting claims on this part of the Arctic,"
 
He said Canada's military and scientific presence in the Arctic pales in comparison to Russia's.
 
"At the moment, obviously, we are no match for the Russians," he said. "The Russians are stronger, better and have more money."
 

But while Russia has better scientific capacity, superior icebreaking and military capacity, Dutkiewicz said, Canada has a few northern strengths as well. He pointed out Canada's stricter environmental and biodiversity protections, better health and social conditions in the north, and excellent satellite technology.
 
He said co-operation, rather than conflict, will best serve Canada's national interest.
 
"If we start competition, at the moment, we may lose," he said. "If we start co-operation, we may win."
 

(With files from Agence France-Presse and Matthew Fisher, Postmedia News)

                                            Article shared with provisions of The Copyright Act

Offline WingsofFury

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Re: Russia wants to deploy two brigades in the arctic.
« Reply #54 on: July 07, 2011, 11:50:28 »
While Canada does not have such ambitious plans for infrastructure or military bases in the Arctic,

I know the plans are behind schedule but to say that we have no ambitious plans for infrastructure or military bases in the Arctic is, in my personal opinion, inaccurate.

I also think that there will be more plans announced over the next few years which will increase the Canadian Forces capability in the arctic on all three fronts.

From an Air Force perspective, with the successful completion of Op Boxtop last year using the CC-177, the successful landing of a CP-140 Aurora at CFS Alert, and the overflight of a pair of CF-18's and a Polaris tanker of Alert, will, as one of the articles states,

Quote
The Air Force’s increasingly robust capability to operate in the North will continue to be tested and demonstrated in the coming months and years.

Reference articles hyperlinked below:

Nanisivik, Nunavut naval facility project delayed at least two years

Northern lights shine on Canada’s Air Force

Aurora makes historic Alert landing

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Re: Russia wants to deploy two brigades in the arctic.
« Reply #55 on: July 07, 2011, 11:54:31 »


Reproduced with the usual caveats et cetera
NASA spent $12 Million designing a pen that could write in the zero gravity environment of space. The Russians went with pencils.

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Re: Russia wants to deploy two brigades in the arctic.
« Reply #56 on: July 07, 2011, 14:54:41 »
Hah that's funny, I can imagine the Afghan hands, scanning the beach at Coppermine for IED's just out of habit.

In 10 years the new guys will be rolling their eyes about the "Old Afghans types" just as the current genration rolled their eyes at the "cold war types", who rolled their eyes at the "Korean war vets".

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Re: Russia wants to deploy two brigades in the arctic.
« Reply #57 on: May 31, 2012, 07:52:01 »
I'm not a big fan of the ceasefire.ca web page, but the site is sharing a July 2011 Briefing Note (6 page PDF), obtained via ATIP request, attributed to the DM of DND outlining Russia's threat (or lack thereof) to the Arctic - an excerpt:
Quote
.... While many observers have commented in the media on Russia's perceived provocative actions in the Arctic, there has yet to be any serious cause for alarm .... {REDACTED} .... Moreover, DFAIT has noted in the past that both countries also share common challenges related to policy making in the Arctic.  Indeed, these commonalities could yield political and commercial opportunities for cooperation between Moscow and Ottawa.  From a Defence perspective, in spite of disagreements over Russian (Long Range Aviation) flights, there is mutual interest with regard to cooperation in SAR and Arctic domain awareness.  Defence is continuing to explore the potential for further cooperation with Russia in these fields ....
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Offline Chris Pook

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Russia's next objective: Assert Arctic Dominance?
« Reply #58 on: August 31, 2014, 14:16:26 »
Via the Guardian
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/aug/29/putin-ukraine-forces-nazis-arctic

Quote
He (Putin) answered questions from young supporters, some waving banners bearing his face, at a pro-Kremlin youth camp on the shores of a lake. He looked relaxed but his tone grew intense as he spoke of Russia's military might, reminding the crowd that Russia was a strong nuclear power. "Russia's partners … should understand it's best not to mess with us," he said.

And he made a pointed reference to the Arctic, which, with its bounteous energy reserves and thawing waterways, is emerging as a potential new point of conflict between Russia and its western rivals. "Our interests are concentrated in the Arctic. And of course we should pay more attention to issues of development of the Arctic and the strengthening of our position," he said.


How thin should we slice the salami?
"Wyrd bið ful aræd"

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Re: Russia's next objective: Assert Arctic Dominance?
« Reply #59 on: August 31, 2014, 14:49:42 »
Via the Guardian
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/aug/29/putin-ukraine-forces-nazis-arctic

How thin should we slice the salami?


Our first slice should be to announce that we will acquire and deploy at least four under-ice capable (say 15 days under ice endurance*) submarines: air independent propulsion. I do not have anything like enough knowledge, but at least two countries, Germany and Sweden, have and use such vessels.

_____
* I'm guessing that 10 days at, say 10 knots = 2,000+ nautical miles which I'm also guessing is sufficient for our purposes.)
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Offline MCG

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Re: Russia's next objective: Assert Arctic Dominance?
« Reply #60 on: August 31, 2014, 14:59:33 »
It certainly makes a NATO arctic expansion seem to our benefit.

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Re: Russia's next objective: Assert Arctic Dominance?
« Reply #61 on: August 31, 2014, 15:12:04 »
It certainly makes a NATO arctic expansion seem to our benefit.

Rejuvenate Goose Bay perhaps?
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Re: Russia's next objective: Assert Arctic Dominance?
« Reply #62 on: August 31, 2014, 15:46:48 »
CFB Churchill MB?
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Re: Russia's next objective: Assert Arctic Dominance?
« Reply #63 on: August 31, 2014, 16:05:41 »
CFB Tuktoyaktuk?
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/the-north/building-a-road-to-arctic-prosperity/article16396177/?page=all

Quote
Building a road to open up the riches of Canada's North

JEFFREY JONES
TUKTOYAKTUK, NWT — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 17 2014, 6:00 PM EST
Last updated Tuesday, Jan. 21 2014, 2:27 PM EST

... the construction taking place on the new $300-million all-weather road near the Arctic hamlet of Tuktoyaktuk, NWT...

....it winds its way toward Inuvik, 140 kilometres south....

When completed in four years, the gravel roadway will for the first time connect Tuktoyaktuk, ....to the rest of Canada year-round. It is a link that many northerners have long urged. They predict it will foster a new era of economic growth and prosperity following a number of false starts for resource developments over the decades, and it may one day become the northern section of a $1.7-billion route along the Mackenzie River valley.....

"Wyrd bið ful aræd"

"If change isn’t allowed to be a process, it becomes an event." - Penny Mordaunt 10/10/2019

“Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards” ~ Soren Kierkegaard

Offline Chris Pook

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Re: Russia threatens to seize swathe of Arctic
« Reply #64 on: February 06, 2015, 13:34:37 »
Bump

Vlad has not changed his tune in seven years

Quote
Vladimir Putin Wants an Arctic Air Army for 2015
 
Written by
BEN MAKUCH
EDITOR, CANADA
January 1, 2015 // 03:47 PM CET
​Most people might be pledging to themselves that they’ll eat less MacDonald’s or go to the gym more, but for Vladimir Putin, his New Year’s resolution is a new Russian war machine for the Arctic.

In a recent appearance on Russian television, top general Valery Gerasimov said the Russian army is looking to install a new “A​ir Army” in the north by 2015, with an eye at protecting hotly contested Arctic borders.

"We have already assigned an air defense division to the fleet, and we will form a joint air and air defense army there," Gerasimov said, according to a report from Russian state media service Sputnik.

The move is clearly in line with Russia’s overall plans of bolstering its northern presence to fend off the inevitable diplomatic claims of rival states like Canada, on so-far undetermined international Arctic borders.

In the same television interview, Gerasimov said the Russian military would be reopening old airfields and building new ones, stationing new specially trained arctic soldiers in Siberian bases, and all the while installing radar detection sites capable of catching enemy aircraft.

Amidst economic calamities in Moscow, the Russian military has continued to make announcements on new capabilities and purchases for its rapidly modernizing forces. Just last November, defence officials claimed the Russian military was in line for new hypersonic missiles in 2020 and a brand new drone base in northern Siberia.

Despite these new developments, Vladimir Putin was keen to dissuade the international community of any underhanded Russian plans for the Arctic, claiming in December that his country was against the militarization of the Far North.

“Once again I stress that we are not going to engage in the militarization of the Arctic. Our actions in the region are measured and reasonably moderate, and they are absolutely necessary to ensure Russian defense capabilities,” said Putin in a Sp​utnik report.

With estimates putting billions of square feet of natural gas and countless barrels of oil lying in the Arctic crust, Russia and other so-called Arctic states are circling the potential revenues at their doorstep. Putin, who presides over a major petro-economy in Russia, has made it his national and fiscal plan to conquer the Arctic.

But that’s not without the impositions of Canada’s own Prime Minister Stephen Harper, who has made plays for the Arctic in his own right. Drones for the Arctic are at the top his wish list, too, along with new fighter aircraft to patrol the frigid skies.

Both countries also played the fighter jet version of cops and robbers in 2014, as Russian MiGs and Tu-95 heavy bombers were seen and intercepted near Canadian airspace in what most saw as a pesky military response to Canada’s strong stance on the invasion of Ukraine.

In the end, while Putin may publicly state his nation isn’t interested in escalating its Arctic military capabilities, the creeping bombers, bases, and Arctic soldiers speaks volumes for the future: the Arctic is his gem and Russia is prepared to defend its claim.

TOPICS: arctic borders, russia, putin, arctic, machines, vladimir putin

http://motherboard.vice.com/en_ca/read/vladimir-putin-wants-an-arctic-air-army-for-2015?utm_source=Outbrain&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=MotherboardCanada

Not "mukluks" but certainly an enhanced "no fly zone".

"Wyrd bið ful aræd"

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“Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards” ~ Soren Kierkegaard

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Re: Russia threatens to seize swathe of Arctic
« Reply #66 on: February 06, 2015, 19:14:16 »
Two-dimensional gas?

Nah. Big field, just thin.
It's hard to win an argument against a smart person, it's damned near impossible against a stupid person.

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Offline Colin P

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Re: Russia threatens to seize swathe of Arctic
« Reply #67 on: February 07, 2015, 00:57:36 »
Our new Ranger rifle will surely put the fear of god into Ivan.

Offline Sheep Dog AT

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Re: Russia threatens to seize swathe of Arctic
« Reply #68 on: February 07, 2015, 01:04:10 »
I think they have their hands full with the Ukraine, worthless rubble, and surplus of oil.
Apparently infamous for his one liners.
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Re: Russia threatens to seize swathe of Arctic
« Reply #69 on: February 07, 2015, 08:06:38 »
Our new Ranger rifle will surely put the fear of god into Ivan.

Should they get them any time soon...which I doubt.  Ironically, they could probably trudge over the Pole or the Barents Sea and get some AK's pretty quick and cheap and be back shooting before someone in Ottawa makes up their mind what they'll get and what company in Quebec will be making them.

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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Russia threatens to seize swathe of Arctic
« Reply #70 on: February 07, 2015, 09:35:59 »
No surprise that it looks like they are flying a Scottish flag from the bridge of that Boomer:

Russia Sends Nuclear Submarine Troops on Arctic Exercise

http://www.newsweek.com/russia-sends-nuclear-submarines-arctic-exercise-304931
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Offline hotei

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Re: Russia threatens to seize swathe of Arctic
« Reply #71 on: February 07, 2015, 10:00:51 »
That is actually the Russian Naval Ensign. The Scottish flag is the inverse.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_Navy_Ensign

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: Russia threatens to seize swathe of Arctic
« Reply #72 on: February 07, 2015, 10:06:29 »
That is actually the Russian Naval Ensign. The Scottish flag is the inverse.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_Navy_Ensign

Coincidence? I think not....  ;D
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Offline Chris Pook

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Re: Russia threatens to seize swathe of Arctic
« Reply #73 on: February 07, 2015, 10:42:20 »
Quote
Andrew is the patron saint of several countries and cities including: Barbados, Romania, Russia, Scotland, Ukraine, Amalfi in Italy, Esgueira in Portugal, Luqa in Malta, Parañaque in the Philippines and Patras in Greece. He was also the patron saint of Prussia and of the Order of the Golden Fleece. He is considered the founder and the first bishop of the Church of Byzantium and is consequently the patron saint of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople.

The flag of Scotland (and consequently the Union Flag and that of its commonwealth countries) feature St Andrew's saltire cross. The saltire is also the flag of Tenerife, the former flag of Galicia and the naval jack of Russia. The Confederate flag also features a saltire commonly referred to as a St Andrew's cross, although its designer, William Porcher Miles, said he changed it from an upright cross to a saltire so that it would not be a religious symbol but merely a heraldic device. The Florida and Alabama flags also show that device.

The feast of Andrew is observed on 30 November in both the Eastern and Western churches, and is the national day of Scotland. In the traditional liturgical books of the Catholic Church, the feast of St. Andrew is the first feast day in the Proper of Saints.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_the_Apostle

Add in the predilection for both Burns and the Bottle (not to mention the Clydeside affection for Red Banners or the Declaration of Arbroaths reference to Scythian origins for at least some of the Scots) ....... MacComrade

Up St Andrew! Away with this upstart Romish cult of St Peter  >:D






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Re: Russia's Arctic Militarization (merged)
« Reply #74 on: November 20, 2015, 09:50:54 »
Here's why Russia says it's pushing troops onto the tundra ....
Quote
Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin has said that the Russian military bases in the Arctic are not aimed at militarizing the region, they are necessary for the protection of economic projects.

"The establishment of our military bases and airfields in the macro-region [the Arctic region] is not aimed at militarizing this region, we do not have such goals. Our aim is to create conditions for economic development and protect both the existing and future infrastructure projects," he told a joint meeting of the Arctic and Antarctic Expert Council under Russia’s Federation Council and the State Commission on Arctic Development.

Rogozin noted that Russia collaborated with its partners in this work.

"Today we hear criticism from many countries over the militarization of the Russian Arctic. "This is nothing more than propaganda," he said. "If we come to the Arctic region economically and implement such global projects as the work on the Arctic shelf, the development of the Northern Sea Route, it is clear that the economy requires security," he said ....
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