• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Name This Ship!

Oldgateboatdriver

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
308
Points
880
You are correct Winnipegoo7. I did not express myself properly: They were the first ships in a missile engagement: that is they were in a fight where there actually were ships shooting missiles at one another from both sides. Basically they traded shots with the Egyptians, resulting in a draw: nobody sank anyone.

The two first missile "kills" you mention were from missile boats against "classic" ships of their era, not armed against missiles at all and with no missiles of their own, but guns only (for surface warfare).
 

Cloud Cover

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Reaction score
30
Points
530
OGBD, you are going to have to drop a hint I'm thinking something down in the land of Oz, but cannot find a class or type that matches 2 X RHIB rapid on the stern with transom platforms port and stbd.
 

Oldgateboatdriver

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
308
Points
880
Yes. I think dropping a few hints is useful:

1) She is very recently (less than a year) in service;
2) She is a Canadian design (Yeah!) of STX, but I won't tell you which yard (yet);
3) Look South, young man (or woman, I am not sexist on ship ID), but not that far South (Oz).
 

Oldgateboatdriver

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
308
Points
880
Well done, NFLD Sapper.

Pride of the Senegalese Navy it is, indeed.

Glad to see that it got everyone looking for awhile.

Your move, my friend!
 

Nfld Sapper

Army.ca Fixture
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
14
Points
580
Hmm....

Let's try this.

Name, Country and for bonus points year laid down and year of decommissioning.
 

Lumber

Army.ca Veteran
Donor
Reaction score
150
Points
680
That has to be one of the most odd looking hulls I've ever seen.
 

Oldgateboatdriver

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
308
Points
880
Yes. It was one of those great design ideas of Admiral Popov, the creator of the all-round battleships. He figured that, with engines providing propulsion, you did not have to be married to hull forms that were created for sailing vessels and an all-round ship would be like an army fort at sea, able to have guns facing all directions.

His designs proved heavily flawed. His All-round battleships were impossible to steer properly, as for Livadia, her hull cracked as a result of waves crashing on it on her maiden voyage from the builder in Scotland to her home port. She spent most of her extremely short life in dry dock being repaired, having served only once for the purpose she was built for: yacht for the Romanov family.

 

Nfld Sapper

Army.ca Fixture
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
14
Points
580
Correct, I thought it would take longer to find....

The Livadia was an imperial yacht of the House of Romanov built in 1879–1880 to replace a yacht of the same name that had sunk off the coast of Crimea in 1878. The new Livadia, intended for service on the Black Sea, was a radically novel ship conceived by Vice Admiral Andrey Popov, designed by naval architect Erast Gulyaev and built by John Elder & Co. of Govan on Clyde. The Livadia continued Popov's line of circular ships although this time Popov sacrificed geometrical perfection for seagoing capabilities. She had a beam of 153 ft (47 m) against overall length of only 259 ft (79 m). An extreme example of tumblehome architecture, she sported a conventionally shaped superstructure mounted on a wide, flat-bottomed, turbot-shaped submerged hull or pontoon.

The Livadia left Greenock on October 3 with Popov, Tideman, Edward James Reed and William Houston Stewart on board. She safely reached Brest on October 7, where she picked up General Admiral of the Imperial Navy Grand Duke Constantine. On October 8 the Livadia sailed into the Bay of Biscay and was soon caught in a violent storm. According to Reed, sailing straight into the storm to test the ship was Constantine's idea and that no Russian dared to argue. Waves of six to seven meters failed to upset the Livadia: transverse roll did not exceed 3.5 degrees, longitudinal pitch was within 5.5 degrees. Stewart praised the comfort of the Livadia: "I never was in so comfortable a ship at sea in a gale of wind ... the absence of rolling, the easiness of motion, the great comfort on board, and the handiness of steering, were such as I have never seen before in any other ship under similar circumstances of weather and sea".

However, the crew was alarmed by the thunder-like sound of the waves slamming against her flat bottom. Reed and Vogak wrote that at times it sounded as if the ship had hit a hard rock. Around 10 a.m. of the next day the hull cracked, the space between inner and outer bottoms was flooded, and Vogak rushed his ship to a safe anchorage in Ferrol. The divers discovered a five-meter-long dent and numerous cracks in the fore segment of the hull which were ultimately blamed on waves. Popov concurred and admitted his failure "to foresee the effects of shallow draft". He wrote that the damage had dual mechanism: first, when the flat pontoon pitched above the waves, gravity subjected it to an enormous stress, bending the whole structure down. Next, as it plummeted down, the flat bottom hit water head-on, rupturing the rivets and tearing off the crossbeams. Reed noted that the radial framing pattern chosen by the designers resulted in a strong center section and inadequately weak extremities, and that any experienced shipbuilder should have discovered this weakness in advance.

The Livadia could have been quickly repaired in a drydock, but none of world's docks was wide enough for her. The new drydock in Nikolaev, designed by Clark Stanfield specifically for the battleship Novgorod and the other popovkas, had not yet been expanded to fit the Livadia. Moored in Ferrol, Spain, for seven months, she became an easy prey for the journalists. The New York Times ridiculed the Livadia, her designers and her crowned patron: instead of blowing up the Livadia, the "nihilists" designed her, for it was hardly possible to conceive a worse ship. According to the anonymous satirist she was "a yacht on board of which seasickness would be wholly unnecessary", "a Nihilist device that no Nihilist would dream of destroying." Instead of hunting terrorists, "the English and Russian Police should seize the designer of the Livadia and hang him on the spot." In November the newspaper changed its attitude, this time praising the Livadia for her stability on the high seas; the speed attained by "an enormous iron turtle" impressed the reporter who suggested that the Livadia "may possibly lead to considerable changes in the art of ship-building."

According to the New York Times, on December 10 the Russians dispatched 83 men to assist repairs on the Livadia while still entertaining plans to build a 12,000-ton Livadia-style armed ironclad. Repairs proceeded slowly, and the Livadia left Ferrol only on May 7 1881 [O.S. April 26]. The Livadia, captained by Vice Admiral Ivan Shestakov, proceeded with utmost caution, evading rough waves at all costs. She passed the Bosphorus on June 7 1881 [O.S. May 26] and reached Sebastopol on the next day. She made 3,890 miles in 381 hours, consuming more than 2,900 tons of coal. Shestakov reported easy steering, perfect stability and good build quality of the Livadia but advised against using her as a royal yacht until further tests could attest to her safety for Black Sea operations.

More information and pictures here

EDITED TO ADD

Answers to bonus questions....

Laid down: 1879 (Official ceremony: March 25, 1880)
Launched: June 25, 1880
Commissioned: September 30, 1880
Decommissioned:
1883 (hulked as Opyt)
1926 (written off)
Fate: Scrapped
 

Cloud Cover

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Reaction score
30
Points
530
  • NATO name of equipment
    Function
    Range(est)
    3 classes of ships equipped with it

 

Oldgateboatdriver

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
308
Points
880
The antena is for a Nato designated Russian made "Top Plate" 3D radar.

Function is surface and air surveillance. Range(-ish) is Line of Sight for surface contact and 130-50 Km -ish for air.

Three classes fitted with said radar: Soviet Navy  Krivak class destroyers, Indian Navy Talwar class and Russian Border Guard Nerei class. Your picture is actually of the INS frigate Trikand.  ;D
 

Eye In The Sky

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
1,548
Points
940
I thought there was more than just the Krivaks with it in the Russian fleet...Sov's for one.  I'd have to check my 'book' but...I'd be willing to bet a $20 Monopoly money.  ;D
 

Oldgateboatdriver

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
308
Points
880
You are quite right EITS, and many more classes fitted with  the "Half Plate" or other derivatives, but he asked for three classes, so I gave him three  :).
 

Edward Campbell

Army.ca Myth
Subscriber
Donor
Mentor
Reaction score
893
Points
1,040
It appears to be a Katanpää Class mine countermeasure vessel (MCMVs), built by Intermarine (Italy), for the Finnish Navy.

(I guessed MCMV then looked until I found that picture (top row, right end, in my Google search).)

Edit: typo.
 
Top