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Radio Chatter / Re: Is Your Workplace Tough — or Is It Toxic?
« Last post by Navy_Wannabe on Today at 17:44:55 »
Just like the referenced article, I have unfortunately got close to being confused as to who was the victim and who was the perpetrator. As a recent graduate, I definitely experienced that difficulty of securing a job. Unlike the baby boomers who had to choose 1 out of 25 job offers, at least an account from one of the guest speakers in class, I had to go through 25+ job interviews and secure 1 job offer. Most of my peers weren't able to get jobs right after graduation. I was so full of aspiration and determination. And now I know better.

With job insecurity, being so green in the field, and the desperation to learn as much as I can on the job, I endured the verbal and emotional harassment at that place. I definitely felt ashamed of myself.

The firm was ISO-certified (but was not anymore when I first got there). It is privately owned. Not that I was dirty, but I feel like, until today, bringing this experience to the attention of regulators/administrators/someone would be opening a can of worms. I don't think it will serve any purpose. Turn-over rate at that place was definitely high. During my less than 2 years I saw >25 people come and go. This is a company with a national presence. If an organization is stumbling/struggling, I believe that it will eventually manifest itself.
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Congo ~ there's now two or three of 'em ~ was a socio-economic and political disaster zone in 1960 when the Belgians turned tail and fled in the face of a black revolt. If memory serves (I'm just too damned lazy to Google old, painful memories) there were 18 black people in Congo with university degrees when the Belgians left ... the Church did a great job, actually, and some of those nuns and priests were probably saints, but they only provided an elementary education, up to about a Belgian 8th grade standard ... maybe.

The Congolese Army was, to be charitable, a shambles ... but the civil government made it look pretty good.

Union Minière du Haut-Katanga, the big HUGE, corrupt and brutal Belgian mining conglomerate had its own mercenary army (a few, a small handful of them were quite good, most were white trash of the worst sort, afraid of their own shadows) and its own puppet government.

The Congolese people had a whole hockey sock full of legitimate grievances ... Belgium ran way, with most of the money and left a few priests and nuns to say prayers. The Army revolted ... some of the atrocities don't bear thinking about. Brigadier (later General) Jacques Dextraze oragnized and, personally, led raids into Kantaga province to rescue hostages. RCCS Colonel "Buster" Stethem comandeered a UN or Red Cross (I cannot remember which) light aircraft and took a box of 36 grenades and conducted a "bombing mission' to break up one attack on a civilian (nuns) run relief camp not far from Leopoldville. The UN administration was a complete farce ... inept officials and the "lord high secretariat" in new York interfering in minor, local decisions and the UN military command ranged from OK, sometimes, to, too often, a nightmare.

When the UN left, mid-1960s, they left the place worse than they found it and no one - not Belgium, certainly, not the USA, not the USSR and not the fledgling EEC, gave a damn because even though Congo is resource rich, Union Minière had survived and was selling whatever Congo had to whoever had cash money.

Don't blame the Congolese ... they never had a chance.
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Recruiting / Re: Time use in the Regular forces
« Last post by PuckChaser on Today at 17:39:07 »
How do military folks usually deal when they have assets? Family trusts?

Family trusts, or they become administrative burdens because they're never able to do taskings since they're so busy with other aspects of their life. The latter of those individuals usually has a short, unfulfilling career in the CAF.

If regular time commitment is an issue, there's always the Reserves.
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RMC, CMR, ROTP / Re: Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP)-RMC [MERGED]
« Last post by FJAG on Today at 17:04:37 »
I was with the Legal branch for over twenty years before I retired and no one went through the system the way that you would prefer.

Simply put, the branch gets enough legal officers by virtue of the direct enrollment system meaning that the individual has already completed both his/her undergraduate and legal education at their own expense. This is a low cost system that allows the branch to evaluate lawyers with a proven track record for education and--probably--legal experience.

The concept behind the MLTP is to take officers who have been in other occupations in the military and provide them with a legal education at the crown's cost. The benefit for the branch is that it obtains a legal officer who has had some diverse form of military experience that will enable him/her to have more breadth of knowledge. Again the branch gets to select from people with proven educational and employment experience.

There is no advantage for the branch in funding someone to have both their undergraduate and legal education in the way that you describe. In essence they are hiring a high school student with a need for seven-eight years of post secondary education still to be done.

I strongly suggest that you look at a better Plan B. If he does wish to go to ROTP then he should do it with the expectation that he will serve out his obligatory service in whatever occupation he was recruited into (non-legal) and that his possibility of later being put on an MLTP is an outside chance.

If you have any further questions, I'll be happy to answer them on this thread or by way of a PM.

 :cheers:
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Radio Chatter / Re: Is Your Workplace Tough — or Is It Toxic?
« Last post by Good2Golf on Today at 17:03:55 »
I knew that many new 'iron rings' get treated poorly, as far as compensation, but that's quite something.  Assuming this is an ISO-certified engineering firm?  Couldn't be a 6-Sigma org, or if it is, has really worked the system.  Did the company have a 'whistle-blower' policy?  Most public firms do, these days.

Sorry to hear about what sounds like a horrible entrance into your profession that would have taken a lot of work and dedication to get into.

Most provinces' Professional Engineering Associations have avenues to register official complaints against such conduct.  Did you look into that at the time?  You yourself would not have to be a P.E. to enquire.

Regards
G2G
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Recruiting / Re: Time use in the Regular forces
« Last post by Move on Today at 16:57:29 »
Oh wow, fair enough.

How do military folks usually deal when they have assets? Family trusts?

PS: Is **** really an illegal word?
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Thanks for the info, Buck. So there won't be anymore ACSO selections using the 2017/2018 numbers?
For 2017/2018 all positions for DEO ACSO have been filled.
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Recruiting / Re: Time use in the Regular forces
« Last post by Brihard on Today at 16:34:40 »
Hello folks,

My concern regarding joining the regular is that I have a small farm. It would be better to put it straight ahead within a testamentary trust, and rent it out (for free, as long as they maintain the place, and they could keep farming revenues / with a special clause that I can come back any time if crap happens).
How do folks from the regular forces deal with their home? (no wifey for now)
Is regular forces 24/7/365 on base?

Regards,

Some work a normal Mon-Fri. Others work shiftwork. All may sometimes be subject to being sent away for weeks or months or a year on training, tasking, and deployments. This can happen arbitrarily and with little notice. If you’re Navy you may go to sea for weeks or months and live on your ship. If you’re Army you may go to the field for same and be out of contact with society. Air Force May have missions or taskings all over the globe.

Your off time is generally your own and most jobs most of the time are Monday to Friday... But it’s unwise to retain any commitments that specifically rely on your personal ability to be consistently physically present or available.
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Recruiting / Time use in the Regular forces
« Last post by Move on Today at 16:24:51 »
Hello folks,

My concern regarding joining the regular is that I have a small farm. It would be better to put it straight ahead within a testamentary trust, and rent it out (for free, as long as they maintain the place, and they could keep farming revenues / with a special clause that I can come back any time if crap happens).
How do folks from the regular forces deal with their home? (no wifey for now)
Is regular forces 24/7/365 on base?

Regards,
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