Author Topic: Question of the Hour  (Read 445258 times)

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Offline Danjanou

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #425 on: September 22, 2005, 22:54:38 »
I was hoping you would be on vacation.

I hope that's in reference to the fact you're aware I'm overworked  and will be going on a long overdue trip soon, and not because I know all the answers.  8)

Quote
You're correct - though I hope the question was correct; I think they were the ones who wore Polish outfits.  I know there was an SS unit involved also in a seperate incident, I think they faked the attack on a radio station that was the alibi to go to war.
 

As far as I recall that's true they also went into Holland before the main force. IIRC they technically came command of the Abwerhe (sp?) and canaries before Hitler wasted them away in pointless missions in Russia. I think you're right they were SS there too.

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There was a movie set in WWII shot in the 60s. which featured the Brandenburg commando - sort ofs, (complete with cuff titles on their uniforms as I recall).  One of the lead actors became famous later as the first public figure to announce he had AIDs, which he died of in 1985.  The other lead actor, who died in 1994, played a World War One flying ace in another film.   What was the movie with the Brandenburgers in it, who were the two actors, and what was the WW I film he starred in?

Oh this one is easy

The movie was Tobruk / (1966). Parts of it were also used for the film Raid on Rommel with Richard Burton.

Rock Hudson (who died of AIDs in 1985)  played the Canadian Engineer Captain and George Peppard who also played the arrogant ace in the Blue Max[/i] played the Brandenburger Hauptmann.

Peppard and his men weren't really Brandenburgers though, my question who were they?

Who played the British Commando CO?

Who played his RSM?
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Offline Bill Smy

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #426 on: September 23, 2005, 05:29:48 »
Which Canadian Governor General and Commander-in-Chief rose in rank from Ensign to Field Marshall wothout once resorting to purchase?

 :salute:
"I have ate of the King's salt and therefore I conceive it to be my duty to serve with unhesitating zeal and cheerfulness when and where my King or his government may think proper to employ me."

Offline STA Gunner

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #427 on: September 23, 2005, 10:14:21 »
Just a shot in the dark, because he was a stand up guy...

Viscount Byng?
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Offline Michael Dorosh

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #428 on: September 23, 2005, 10:50:21 »
I hope that's in reference to the fact you're aware I'm overworked  and will be going on a long overdue trip soon, and not because I know all the answers.  8)
 

As far as I recall that's true they also went into Holland before the main force. IIRC they technically came command of the Abwerhe (sp?) and canaries before Hitler wasted them away in pointless missions in Russia. I think you're right they were SS there too.

Oh this one is easy

The movie was Tobruk / (1966). Parts of it were also used for the film Raid on Rommel with Richard Burton.

Rock Hudson (who died of AIDs in 1985)  played the Canadian Engineer Captain and George Peppard who also played the arrogant ace in the Blue Max[/i] played the Brandenburger Hauptmann.

Peppard and his men weren't really Brandenburgers though, my question who were they?

Who played the British Commando CO?

Who played his RSM?


I already googled this so I will hold off. 

Here's hoping you get that vacation soon. ;D
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Offline Bill Smy

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #429 on: September 23, 2005, 11:39:48 »
Just a shot in the dark, because he was a stand up guy...

Viscount Byng?

If you accept that Ensign and 2nd Lieutenant are basically equivalent ranks, you're correct, STA Gunner. But I was thinking of another Governor General.
"I have ate of the King's salt and therefore I conceive it to be my duty to serve with unhesitating zeal and cheerfulness when and where my King or his government may think proper to employ me."

Offline Danjanou

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #430 on: September 23, 2005, 11:55:20 »
Which Canadian Governor General and Commander-in-Chief rose in rank from Ensign to Field Marshall wothout once resorting to purchase?
 :salute:

Field Marshal the Earl Alexander of Tunis (GG 1946-52)

http://www.gg.ca/governor_general/history/bios/alexander_e.asp
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Offline geo

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #431 on: September 23, 2005, 11:57:58 »
Hmmm

Field Marshall Alexander?
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Offline Danjanou

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #432 on: September 23, 2005, 12:07:23 »
Hmmm

Field Marshall Alexander?

"He was promoted to Field Marshal in 1944 after the capture of Tunis in 1943 and subsequently captured Rome in 1944."

(from the link I enclosed).

Mind I was alway under the impression that it was troops advancing out of the Anzio beachhead lead by the 1st SSF that captured Rome. Pretty daring for one middle aged senior officer to do it on his own. 8)
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Offline Bill Smy

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #433 on: September 23, 2005, 22:20:40 »
Field Marshal the Earl Alexander of Tunis (GG 1946-52)

http://www.gg.ca/governor_general/history/bios/alexander_e.asp


Well, I guess I goofed on this. But the key word in my question was "Ensign".

 :salute:
"I have ate of the King's salt and therefore I conceive it to be my duty to serve with unhesitating zeal and cheerfulness when and where my King or his government may think proper to employ me."

Offline Bill Smy

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #434 on: September 24, 2005, 03:12:41 »
I guess I should have done a bit more homework on this and worded the question better. The answer I was looking for was Sir John Colborne.

Of course, the purchase system was long gone by the time of Byng and Alexander.

 :salute: :salute:  :cdn:
"I have ate of the King's salt and therefore I conceive it to be my duty to serve with unhesitating zeal and cheerfulness when and where my King or his government may think proper to employ me."

Offline reccecrewman

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #435 on: September 25, 2005, 20:52:54 »
Where does the common saying "The whole 9 yards" come from?
Some people wonder all their lives if they've made a difference....... Soldiers don't have that problem.

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Offline ArmyVern

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #436 on: September 25, 2005, 21:04:25 »
This is a good one...I'm not sure anybody really knows for sure..

I've heard it's origins come from the amount of material required to make everything from a gentleman's suit, a nun's habit, a Scotsman's kilt.
To the Miltary origins in WWII (pilots using 'the whole nine yards' of their ammo, to Vietnamese tribes assisting US Forces, to Navalyards claiming it as their own.
Not to mention the famous "total load of the cement truck."

I wonder?? Where did it really come from?? ???
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Offline Michael O'Leary

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #437 on: September 25, 2005, 21:09:56 »
The whole nine yards:-

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/411150.html

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At the outset it should be said that no one knows the origin, although many have a fervent belief that they do.

Quote
These are some of the versions going the rounds: take your pick...

- It comes from the nine cubic yards capacity of US concrete trucks and dates from around 1970s.

- The explanation refers to World War II aircraft, which if proved correct would clearly predate the concrete truck version. There are several aircraft related sources, 1. the length of US bombers bomb racks, 2. the length of RAF Spitfire's machine gun bullet belts, 3. the length of ammunition belts in ground based anti-aircraft turrets, etc. No evidence to show that any of these measured nine yards has been forthcoming.

- Tailors use nine yards of material for top quality suits. Related to 'dressed to the nines'?

- The derivation has even been suggested as being naval and that the yards are shipyards rather than measures of area or volume.

- Another naval version is that the yards are yardarms. Large sailing ships had three masts, each with three yardarms. The theory goes that ships in battle can continue changing direction as new sails are unfurled. Only when the last sail, on the ninth yardarm, is used do the enemy know which direction the ship is finally headed.

- A mediaeval test requiring the victim to walk nine paces over hot coals.

If anyone has any hard evidence of this phrase being used before 1967, e.g. an appearance of the phrase in print, we would love to see it. Please post your feedback at the Phrase Finder Discussion Forum - but please, evidence not conjecture.

Offline ArmyVern

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #438 on: September 25, 2005, 21:17:04 »
Now that is the web-site that I needed when the instructor insisted on my 6s (during another inane topic to kill time) that this saying had originated because of the Vietnamese tribes which assist the US.
Despite all the other suggestions mentionned by students (I myself mentionned the Scotsman kilt as that is what I've heard-but most insisted on the cement truck theory), he insisted that this was published in a book having to do with the War in Vietnam and therefore must be right.  ???
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Offline redleafjumper

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #439 on: September 25, 2005, 22:43:18 »
The whole nine yards refers to the length of the ammunition belt for the .50 cal HMG (waist guns) in the B17 American Bomber of WW2.

What battle did Wellington consider his greatest victory and why?
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"After all, courage of the lonely sort is surely the most glorious thing that we can hope to witness, and whether it is displayed upon our side or upon the other, one feels the better for having witnessed it."  Major H. Hesketh-Pritchard, DSO, MC in Sniping in France 1914-18, p. 113.

Offline Michael O'Leary

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #440 on: September 25, 2005, 22:53:59 »
Assaye

http://www.victorianweb.org/history/crimea/beck/4.html

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Wellington first made a name for himself as a military leader in India, where in 1802 he defeated a much larger enemy force. At the village of Assaye, Wesley led 7,000 men and 22 guns in an audacious attack on an enemy force of 40,000 men and over 100 guns. Was this not a foolhardy deed? One of his volunteer soldiers wrote later, "I can assure you, till our troops got the order to advance the fate of the day seemed doubtful; and if the numerous cavalry of the enemy had done their duty I hardly think it possible we could have succeeded" (quoted in Hibbert 1997, 42-43). Wesley carried the day, and for this victory he was named Knight of the Bath. When asked many years later which battle had been his finest, the Duke "was silent for about 10 seconds & then answered, 'Assaye'. He did not add a word" (Ibid.) If, perhaps, Twain did take an event from Wellington's experience in India and move it to the Crimea, in a curious reversal only a few years later another author fictionalized the charge of the Light Brigade â ” and placed it in India (George Meredith's Lord Ormont, 1894). To say that Assaye was his greatest victory is an extraordinary claim, considering all his later triumphs in Spain, to say nothing of Waterloo. Still, one modern historian asserts: "Without question Assaye was the greatest of Arthur Wellesley's Indian victories" (Weller, 194).

Offline redleafjumper

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #441 on: September 25, 2005, 22:59:48 »
Michael, I'd sure hate to be in an ambush that you set up!  That was darn quick and as usual 100% correct.
Let's see how you do with this one:

What banned device, ruled to be a dangerous weapon of war, never killed anyone when used as designed?
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"After all, courage of the lonely sort is surely the most glorious thing that we can hope to witness, and whether it is displayed upon our side or upon the other, one feels the better for having witnessed it."  Major H. Hesketh-Pritchard, DSO, MC in Sniping in France 1914-18, p. 113.

Offline Michael O'Leary

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #442 on: September 25, 2005, 23:47:18 »

Could you be referring to the bagpipes, under the Act of Proscription (1747)?

http://www.scotland.com/forums/showthread.php?threadid=20680&pagenumber=4

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The Act of Proscription, passed in 1747, banned weapons of war and highland dress.

And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the first day of August, one thousand seven hundred and forty seven, no man or boy, within that part of Great Briton called Scotland, other than shall be employed as officers and soldiers in his Majesty's forces, shall on any pretence whatsoever, wear or put on the clothes commonly called Highland Clothes (that is to say) the plaid, philibeg, or little kilt, trowse, shoulder belts, or any part whatsoever of what peculiarly belongs to the highland garb; and that no tartan, or partly-coloured plaid or stuff shall be used for great coats, or for upper coats; and if any such person shall presume, after the said first day of August, to wear or put on the aforesaid garments or any part of them,

But it didn't ban gaelic. It also didn't specifically ban bagpipes, as is popularly thought - although in the administration of the Act, bagpipes were considered a "weapon of war" and thus included. When the Act of Proscription was repealed, proclamations were issued in English and Gaelic. I think the attitude of the English at this time as regards gaelic was one of ignorance and indifference, as the language remained the first language of many highlanders well into the 1800's. The depopulation of the Highands also undoubtedly contributed to the decline of gaelic.

Offline geo

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #443 on: September 26, 2005, 10:05:11 »
Have a bagpipe "open up" on you @ 5AM and tell me about it (sigh)

Some of the Chemical gasses used in WW1 had their roots in Agricultural fertilizers.
Believe the gas Zyclone B used by the Germans in WW2 also 1st designed and used for industrial purposes........

So - ised for purpose originaly designed - not dangerous.......... but killers nevertheless.
Chimo!

Offline redleafjumper

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #444 on: September 26, 2005, 15:26:44 »
Yes, another quick response - the great highland bagpipe - the weapon of war that doesn't kill.  Having opened up with them on a few folks myself, I have found that most of the danger is to the player!

What was the first rifle issued to the British Army and what was the first British Army rifle issued in any serious quantity?
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"After all, courage of the lonely sort is surely the most glorious thing that we can hope to witness, and whether it is displayed upon our side or upon the other, one feels the better for having witnessed it."  Major H. Hesketh-Pritchard, DSO, MC in Sniping in France 1914-18, p. 113.

Offline reccecrewman

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #445 on: September 26, 2005, 16:45:29 »
Quote
The whole nine yards refers to the length of the ammunition belt for the .50 cal HMG (waist guns) in the B17 American Bomber of WW2.

That is the correct answer I was seeking.  It certainly is a question thats up in the air to be speculated about, but in the military context, this is the answer I was seeking.  Both the cement truck & scottish kilt theories have a good claim as well.

Cheers
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Offline Larry Strong

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #446 on: September 26, 2005, 17:28:16 »
First issued in serious quantities would be the "Brown Bess".
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Offline redleafjumper

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #447 on: September 26, 2005, 19:43:22 »
The Brown Bess is not a rifle, it is a smoothbore musket.  A good effort though, anyone else?
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"After all, courage of the lonely sort is surely the most glorious thing that we can hope to witness, and whether it is displayed upon our side or upon the other, one feels the better for having witnessed it."  Major H. Hesketh-Pritchard, DSO, MC in Sniping in France 1914-18, p. 113.

Offline geo

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #448 on: September 26, 2005, 21:00:07 »
The Martini-Henry Rifle is a weapon of Empire. Unlike the Snider-Enfield it replaced, it was England's first service rifle designed from the ground up as a breechloading metallic cartridge firearm. It protected and served the British Empire and her colonies for over 30 years. This robust weapon utilized a falling block, self-cocking, lever operated, single-shot action designed by Friedrich von Martini of Switzerland. The barrel used the Henry Rifling System, designed by Alexander Henry. Henry Peabody, an American, was actually the father of the Martini action. His design utilized an external hammer to strike a firing pin for cartridge ignition. Mr. Martini's refinement of the design basically consisted of conversion to an internal coiled spring activated striker. Martini's improved design flourished and Mr. Peabody's is nearly forgotten. Later in the British Martini's career, other rifling patterns such as the Metford System and even a system devised at Enfield were adopted. It is therefore common to hear these weapons also referred to as Martini-Enfields or Martini-Metfords. The first Martini adopted for service in the British Army was the M-H Mark I, which entered service in June of 1871. There were an additional three main variations of the Martini-Henry Rifle...the Mark II, III and IV. There were also sub variations of these that are commonly called Patterns. In 1877 a Carbine version of the M-H was entered into service. There are five main variations of the Carbine Model: the M-H Carbine Mark I (a.k.a. Cavalry Carbine), the M-H Garrison Artillery Carbine, the M-H Artillery Carbine Mark I, the M-H Artillery Carbine Mark II, and M-H Artillery Carbine Mark III. Initially, British Military Martinis used the Short Chamber Boxer-Henry .45 Caliber black powder cartridge. The original cartridge case was made of a thin sheet of brass rolled around a mandrel, which was then soldered to an iron base. These cartridges were assembled by the orphaned children of British Soldiers, and were relatively cheap to produce. They were found to be vulnerable to being easily damaged, and produced inferior muzzle velocities. Later, the rolled brass case was replaced by a solid brass version which remedied both of these problems. There was also a Carbine version of the Boxer-Henry .45 Caliber cartridge. This round used a 410 grain bullet with 70 grains of black powder, instead of the 480 grain bullet and 85 grains of powder used in the infantry rifle load. The primary reason for the milder load was that the recoil of the rifle load was very punishing when fired in a carbine, and this was found to be the cause of many failures in prototype carbines. In an emergency, either load could be used in either weapon. When the advantages of small caliber, flatter trajectory, high velocity cartridges became evident, an experimental Martini in .402 caliber was designed. Known as the Enfield-Martini Rifle, these rifles offered superior ballistic performance compared to Martinis in .450 caliber. With the adoption of the .303 caliber service cartridge however, the British realized it would be a supply nightmare having to equip units with .450 Martini-Henry, .303, and .402 Enfield-Martini (not to mention pistol and Gating Gun cartridges as well). Thus, the .402 caliber Enfield-Martinis (of which thousands had already been built) were converted to .450 Martini-Henry caliber, and morphed into to what we know as the "A" and "B" pattern Martini-Henry Mark IV. "C" Pattern Martini-Henry Mark IV's were original manufacture weapons, not conversions from the E-M .402.

Chimo!

Offline redleafjumper

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Re: Question of the Hour
« Reply #449 on: September 26, 2005, 21:48:18 »
A lovely rifle and a comprehensive answer, yet unfortunately not the correct one.  Anyone else?  I must confess that I carefully crafted this question so that it was not as google-friendly as some!  I suppose a clue could be that the firearm in question is not a metallic cartridge firearm...
« Last Edit: September 27, 2005, 01:42:18 by redleafjumper »
Redleafjumper

"After all, courage of the lonely sort is surely the most glorious thing that we can hope to witness, and whether it is displayed upon our side or upon the other, one feels the better for having witnessed it."  Major H. Hesketh-Pritchard, DSO, MC in Sniping in France 1914-18, p. 113.