Author Topic: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy  (Read 153428 times)

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jollyjacktar

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #250 on: April 03, 2016, 11:35:40 »
Look at the World Bank data, George:

In the 2011-15 period, it claims that there were 95 refugees that came FROM Canada, which is according to them 5 more than came from Saudi Arabia in the same period. Does this make sense to you?

That must have been after the Alberta provincial elections.    ;D

Offline Brad Sallows

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #251 on: April 03, 2016, 12:26:37 »
I'm too lazy to follow the link today.  Are those simply head counts which include refugees moving through successive countries en route to final settlement?
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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #252 on: April 03, 2016, 12:44:06 »
Actually; it makes you wonder what they use as a definition of "refugee".
From the page in question:
Quote
Refugees are people who are recognized as refugees under the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees or its 1967 Protocol, the 1969 Organization of African Unity Convention Governing the Specific Aspects of Refugee Problems in Africa, people recognized as refugees in accordance with the UNHCR statute, people granted refugee-like humanitarian status, and people provided temporary protection. Asylum seekers--people who have applied for asylum or refugee status and who have not yet received a decision or who are registered as asylum seekers--are excluded. Palestinian refugees are people (and their descendants) whose residence was Palestine between June 1946 and May 1948 and who lost their homes and means of livelihood as a result of the 1948 Arab-Israeli conflict. Country of origin generally refers to the nationality or country of citizenship of a claimant.
I'm too lazy to follow the link today.  Are those simply head counts which include refugees moving through successive countries en route to final settlement?
Could be, according to the UNHCR stats for Canada since 2012

Anyone have any objections to the Canadian stats now?   ;D
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Offline George Wallace

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #253 on: April 03, 2016, 12:53:53 »
SO?  Let's clean up our "Homeless" problem by declaring them all refugees, and the Liberal Government can then make their quota and save on the security checks, etc. as these people are already in country.    [:D   >:D   [:D




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Offline S.M.A.

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Canada could be pressed into reopening NAFTA
« Reply #254 on: May 25, 2016, 00:34:25 »
Both Bernie Sanders and Trump seem to be appealing more to the protectionist fringes of their respective parties, which won't bode well for Canada-US trade:

Canadian Press

Quote
Canada could be pressed into reopening NAFTA, U.S. lawmaker says
[Alexander Panetta, The Canadian Press]

May 24, 2016

WASHINGTON - Canada might be forced to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement if the next U.S. president insists upon it, a Washington lawmaker said Tuesday.

The California congressman said the northern neighbour is so trade-reliant on the U.S. that it couldn't easily ignore an American ultimatum on revising the deal.

"We could walk away from NAFTA any time," said Darrell Issa, who sits on different congressional committees dedicated to intellectual property, foreign affairs and trade. "We've always been able to."

Every major candidate for president has expressed support for changing NAFTA. Republican Donald Trump is a virulent, decades-long critic of trade deals which he's repeatedly said he would change; Democrat Bernie Sanders has been equally critical; and likely Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton has occasionally expressed support for reopening NAFTA.
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Offline Colin P

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #255 on: May 25, 2016, 10:35:31 »
In which case we better go full steam ahead on terminals and pipelines. Perhaps cutting some of the ties might be good for us in the long run.

Offline Chris Pook

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #256 on: May 25, 2016, 10:38:46 »
In which case we better go full steam ahead on terminals and pipelines. Perhaps cutting some of the ties might be good for us in the long run.

Colin - that is a big statement coming from you.

Dead serious.  Not wanting any heat.  If we are to get oil shipped off of your coast what is the best route and what is the best port?
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Offline Colin P

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #257 on: May 25, 2016, 11:54:11 »

Offline MilEME09

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #258 on: June 24, 2016, 22:29:07 »
http://www.macleans.ca/politics/ottawa/if-canada-is-really-back-it-needs-some-backbone/

Quote
If Canada is really back, it needs some backbone

During the high-anxiety run-up to the shocking Brexit vote, it was hard to get a Canadian politician to shut up about it. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he made no “bones” about his support for the Remain side. Ministers Bill Morneau and Stéphane Dion spoke openly about the dire consequences of the U.K. leaving the European Union. Meanwhile, Conservative MP and former House Speaker Andrew Scheer felt compelled to write an article supporting the Leave position. It got to the point where a foreign political leader who didn’t intervene in the domestic politics of Britain looked downright irresponsible. But ask these same people to give their view on Donald Trump and they seize up faster than a Brussels bureaucrat can straighten a banana.

The issues are not dissimilar. The Brexit debate hinged on concerns about trade and economic prosperity, mixed with nativist fears about immigration, security and nationalism: Trump issues to the max. The U.K. is Canada’s third-biggest trading partner, and the vote will hurt our economy. But the U.S. is our largest partner, and Trump’s anti-NAFTA, anti-immigration, volcanic rhetoric poses a significantly higher threat to Canada’s free trade and stability. So if the dangers of the Brexit justified the intervention of Canada’s leaders, shouldn’t Trump?

Apparently not. If a good politician is someone with an opinion carefully prepared to contain no ideas, then Trump has made masters of Ottawa’s mandarins. “I have great faith in the American people and look forward to working with whoever gets elected in November,” Trudeau said when asked about Trump. Yawn. But understandable. In 1967, when Charles De Gaulle blurted out “Vive le Quebec libre,” English Canadians were ready to burn baguettes.

Loads of international law supports butting out of another sovereign state’s business, from the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648 to the UN principle of non-intervention. Respect for sovereign rights has been the cornerstone of peacemaking and globalized trade, but the world has moved beyond the dated concept of non-intervention. The public now expects its leaders to raise issues of human rights or the environment—in public—during any bilateral trade meeting. Globalization has made domestic human rights, and worker rights, fair diplomatic game.

Trump, however, is proving to be an exception. So far, only Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne has dared criticize him. I spoke to her after the Orlando massacre and she said Trump’s policies were “dangerous.” A few days later she went to Washington and doubled down, calling Trump “divisive” and “destabilizing for the continent.” It is high-risk stuff coming from the leader of a province that depends so heavily on trade with the U.S., but she took the risk because her principles overruled political strategy. Isn’t that the kind of politician we want? Isn’t that leadership?

The person who ought to be leading on these files is Stéphane Dion, minister of foreign affairs, but recently he stood mutely as the Chinese foreign minister berated a Canadian journalist for asking a question about human rights. Dion was rightly pilloried.

Dion clings to his so-called doctrine of “responsible conviction,” now Canada’s foreign policy blueprint. The phrase derives from the philosopher Max Weber’s distinction between the ethics of conviction and the ethics of responsibility. It is meant to help Dion gauge the real-life consequence of action based on ideals. While it is refreshing to have a minister grounded in theory, it has revealed him to be a vacillating featherweight, a man who can’t decide whether he stands by selling arms to the Saudis or not, and who has humiliated himself in the debate over the Yazidi genocide.

Earlier this month, Dion voted against a Conservative motion asking the government to recognize that ISIS was committing genocide against 400,000 Yazidis in Iraq. ISIS itself announced its genocidal intentions. In March, John Kerry, the U.S. secretary of state declared it was genocide. Not Dion. Dion was steadfast on the day of the vote, and the day following the vote: no genocide. On the third day of the controversy, Dion did a complete 180, and said it was in fact a genocide. What changed? Not the evidence. The blood of Yazidi children, women and men was practically drenching the reports sitting on his desk. No, it was the appearance of a UN investigative report that changed his mind. #leadership.

The Brexit debate revealed that Canadian leaders will intervene in other countries’ affairs of to a degree, if we believe it protects our interests. Dion could salvage some credibility by challenging Trump on the issue of refugees and immigration, a file on which Canada has shown real leadership. If Trump was using words like “Jews” or “blacks” or “Italians” instead of “Muslims,” would we want Dion to step up and say something? Of course we would. Dion should join Wynne and risk breaking protocol. If Canada really is back, as Dion has bragged, it needs some backbone. So far he has shown none. Trump could be his chance.

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jollyjacktar

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #259 on: June 24, 2016, 22:56:15 »
Mr. Dion, is to my mind a classic Liberal minister with his useless, ineffectual, dithering.  I cannot imagine that knob as PM.

Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #260 on: June 28, 2016, 15:20:02 »
A fig leaf from Trudeau to Peña Nieto ?

Toronto Star

Quote
Canada to lift visa for Mexican visitors in deal before Three Amigos summit

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canada is dropping its visa requirement for Mexican visitors as of December 2016, while Mexico has agreed to open its markets to Canadian beef.

Tues., June 28, 2016

OTTAWA—Canada will lift the visa requirements for Mexican citizens that have become a diplomatic sore spot between the two countries, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced Tuesday.

At a joint press conference with Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto Tuesday morning, Trudeau said the requirements which limited Mexican nationals’ travel in Canada would be lifted by Dec. 1.

At the same time, Mexico has agreed to open their markets to all Canadian beef exports later this year.

(...SNIPPED)

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Offline GAP

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #261 on: June 28, 2016, 18:24:35 »
Forget the Syrians....here come the Mexicans.....again....
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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #262 on: July 06, 2016, 17:50:13 »
And meanwhile -

The Brexit impact on CETA

http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/686645/EU-Brussels-Canada-trade-deal-in-doubt-individual-nations-Brexit-EU-referendum-politics

Jean-Claude says Oui to Chrystia

Quote
Bureaucrats had hoped to act as a tacit EU superstate, rubber stamping the plan on behalf of members and even nations beyond the EU borders.

But, emboldened by Britain's Brexit vote, nation states were today in revolt forcing the European Union into a dramatic re-think.

Quote
Despite the Britich Brexit vote serving as a huge red flag that nation states are vehemently opposed to losing their sovereignty to an unelected Brussels bureaucracy Juncker last week said he believed there was no need to involve parliaments

Martin Schulz wanted a more powerful, overarchin EU government but nation states want more autonomy

Candian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had hoped for a quick EU deal

But Matthias Fekl, France’s trade minister, said it was “unbelievable” that Brussels had been planning to treat the deal as a decision for an overarching EU body.

He added: “I find it even more hallucinatory only a few days after the result of the British referendum that one could envisage this type of procedure at the level of the European Commission."

Romanian politicians have already threatened to oppose the deal because Bucharest is not receiving visa reciprocity from Ottawa.


Juncker’s self-serving decision to act as a superstate has now put the CETA deal in doubt.

Chrystia Freeland, Canada’s trade minister said: “If the EU cannot do a deal with Canada, I think it is legitimate to say: Who the heck can it do a deal with?”

The U-turn flies in the face of EU top chiefs’ calls for "more Europe", and each nation will now get to decide on the groundbreaking deal to stop it being forced through by the European Commission.

The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement between the EU and Canada has been on the table since 2009.

But it is now in doubt as 40 national and regional assemblies will need to approve it.


It is claimed the deal will increase bilateral exports of goods and services by €26billion annually but it appears nations have chosen their own sovereignty over financial gain.

Democracy may be breaking out all over.
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ignoramus et ignorabimus

Offline MCG

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #263 on: August 12, 2016, 13:41:59 »
I found this an entertaining read, and linking to this sites appreciation of "events, dear boy" is the recognition that Canadian leaders rarely have the option of picking the defining foreign policy issues of thier time in office.

Quote
How Trudeau's foreign policy could blow up in his face
It starts with the usual bad luck … and a President Trump

Michael Petrou
iPolitics
12 Aug 2016

Politicians can only rarely follow through on long-term, big-picture foreign policy plans. The world shifts and changes in unexpected ways, and leaders adjust.

Here, for example, is a now almost unrecognizable George W. Bush during a 2000 presidential campaign debate with Al Gore:

“I’m worried about over-committing our military around the world. I want to be judicious in its use ... I just don’t think it’s the role of the United States to walk into a country and say, ‘We do it this way, so should you.’”

9/11 made Bush an imperialist. His successor, Barack Obama, was going to end Bush’s wars, “reset” relations with Russia and pivot America’s foreign policy focus to the Pacific. America is still in Afghanistan, is in Iraq again and relations between Moscow and Washington are as frosty as they’ve been in a generation. The Pacific will have to wait.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau entered office with a vague and rather self-important foreign policy goal — to “restore constructive Canadian leadership in the world” and, more prosaically, advance Canada’s interests. Details included improving relations with the United States and Mexico by reducing trade barriers and lifting the Mexican visa requirement, increasing support for United Nations peacekeeping operations, restoring ties with Iran and mending frayed relations with Russia.

There was scant mention of terrorism or security threats in Trudeau’s mandate letters to either Foreign Minister Stéphane Dion or Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan: Trudeau instructed the two to end Canada’s combat mission in Iraq and Syria (where Canada had been bombing the so-called Islamic State) and refocus on training local forces and humanitarian efforts. Canadians, he said, wanted Ottawa to make a contribution to a more peaceful and prosperous world, and Trudeau’s government would support those aspirations.

Trudeau hasn’t been blown far off course — yet. He’s enjoyed a sun-setting political romance with Obama. Visa requirements for Mexicans will be lifted by the end of the year. All indications are that Canada will soon join at least one UN peacekeeping mission in Africa.

But the world shifts under Trudeau’s feet, too. If the prospect of a “reset” with America didn’t moderate Russia’s behaviour, it should have been obvious that a friendlier prime minister in Ottawa wouldn’t either. It hasn’t.

Russian President Vladimir Putin is ever more belligerent. Fighting between Ukrainian forces and Russia-backed separatists in eastern Ukraine is intensifying. Putin has vowed that a supposed incursion by Ukraine into Crimea (which Russia invaded and annexed two years ago) “will not go unanswered.”

Russia continues its military support for the murderous Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad. And now he’s staged a genuine reset with Turkey, a NATO member state which last year shot down a Russian plane that had briefly entered Turkish airspace.

Under President Recep Erdoan, Turkey is in the midst of a massive purge of those suspected of involvement in an attempted coup last month. Almost 70,000 people — including soldiers, journalists, teachers and judges — have been arrested, suspended or fired, numbers that suggest Erdoan is as interested in crushing dissent as he is in serving justice to those behind the coup attempt.

A NATO member state is sliding toward dictatorship, and its president is cozying up to NATO’s primary adversary. These would be worrying developments for Canada at the best of times. These are not the best of times — especially given the potential for a political earthquake in the United States.

America has always been the cornerstone of the NATO alliance. It will not continue to fill that role if Donald Trump becomes president. Among Trump’s many flaws is his lackadaisical commitment to protecting NATO allies, combined with a bizarre affection for Putin. A Trump presidency — which is a prospect Canada cannot responsibly discount — would embolden Putin and upend the security framework that has kept peace and order in Europe for decades.

This, even more so than the growing international reach of Islamic State, would have implications for Canadian foreign policy priorities, placing demands on Canadian military resources and diplomatic energies.

Contributing to UN peacekeeping operations in Africa, winning a spot on the UN Security Council, developing a North American environmental agreement, leading the global fight against climate change — these are all important goals, and if Trudeau has his way, they'll form the framework of his foreign policy agenda.

But, like other leaders before him, Trudeau won’t get to choose which foreign policy issues define his time in office. All he can do is choose how he responds to them. Trouble is brewing — in Eastern Europe, Turkey, Syria and, most alarmingly, the United States. Trudeau will be hard-pressed to avoid it.


The views, opinions and positions expressed by all iPolitics columnists and contributors are the author’s alone. They do not inherently or expressly reflect the views, opinions and/or positions of iPolitics.
https://ipolitics.ca/2016/08/11/how-trudeaus-foreign-policy-could-blow-up-in-his-face/

Offline Journeyman

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #264 on: August 12, 2016, 14:01:34 »
Contributing to UN peacekeeping operations in Africa, winning a spot on the UN Security Council, developing a North American environmental agreement, leading the global fight against climate change — these are all important goals....
Let's see.....likely disagree.....strongly disagree.....disagree.....and....strongly disagree.    Next.

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #265 on: August 12, 2016, 19:18:36 »
Das schwerpunkt - Georgia.

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Offline S.M.A.

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Trudeau sees chance for "reset" in Canada-China relations
« Reply #266 on: August 29, 2016, 10:53:40 »

Remember what Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said? "... the admiration I have for China because, uh, their basic dictatorship is actually allowing them to ..."


Trudeau will have to walk a fine line between offending China and offending any constituents back in Canada such as Falun Gong exiles whose parents or relatives were killed and harvested for their organs while imprisoned in China.

Canadian Press via Global News

Quote
China sees ‘new opportunity’ with Justin Trudeau in charge
By Andy Blatchford The Canadian Press   

OTTAWA – With Prime Minister Justin Trudeau set to embark on his first official visit to China, the Chinese government is trying to ease concerns about its human rights record as a way to encourage a deeper business relationship with Canada.

The economic superpower sees last year’s election of Trudeau’s Liberal government as a “new opportunity” to strengthen business ties between the two countries, China’s ambassador to Canada told The Canadian Press.

For both sides, the expectations around Trudeau’s week-long trip are high.

Trudeau, who leaves for China on Monday, will focus on building the economic connection between the two countries. On Friday, he described the trip as something of a “reset” in the relationship.

(...SNIPPED)
« Last Edit: August 29, 2016, 11:08:41 by S.M.A. »
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Offline Lightguns

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #267 on: August 29, 2016, 11:02:16 »
Trudeau will have to walk a fine line between offending China and offending any constituents back in Canada such as Falun Gong exiles whose parents or relatives were killed and harvested for their organs while imprisoned in China.

Canadian Press via Global News

I strongly suspect that he will view China the way his daddy viewed Cuba.  This will be the tone of the conversation for Canada; remember how Cuba went from human right abusing dictatorship to the poor little country that took on the USA in Canadian Liberal circles in the 70s.  I think he considers himself his daddy's legacy.   
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Offline Colin P

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #268 on: August 29, 2016, 12:34:26 »
China ratching up the ante. I suspect it has less to do with safety or quality, then to put the screws to Trudeau to see how he reacts. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-08-23/inventing-canola-no-help-for-canada-as-china-changes-import-rule

Offline Journeyman

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #269 on: August 29, 2016, 12:48:33 »
......put the screws to Trudeau to see how he reacts.
Possibly as a bargaining chip in a completely unrelated field. 

As a random example, China could  say "we'll modify this agricultural requirement for our good Canadian friends.....IF you back our South China Sea claims."  In such a hypothetical case, a $2B Canadian export would likely carry more election campaign weight than maintaining international norms.    :dunno:

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #270 on: August 29, 2016, 15:43:31 »
Not of course that China would ever stoop to such tactics......... [lol:

Offline Good2Golf

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #271 on: August 29, 2016, 18:07:38 »
Nor any other first world nation wanting ply its own resources globally like, say....asbestos... :whistle:

Offline S.M.A.

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #272 on: August 31, 2016, 12:33:05 »
No figures yet on what this current govt. will commit to the new AIIB:

Canadian Press

Quote
Canada signals intent to join China-led bank
Canadian Press
Andy Blatchford
9 hrs ago

BEIJING - Justin Trudeau has officially submitted Canada's application to join a controversial new international infrastructure bank led by China — an initiative the Asian country hopes will help build its economic credibility around the world.

China founded the US$100-billion Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank late last year to provide other countries in the region access to capital for investments in projects in areas such as transportation, power and telecommunications.

The Canadian government made the announcement after Trudeau met with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang on Wednesday in Beijing, but did not immediately specify how much money it would put into the new bank.

(...SNIPPED)

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"A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: We did it ourselves."   - Lao Zi (老子)
-------------------------------------------
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm."
- Winston Churchill

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #273 on: August 31, 2016, 12:40:12 »
As a random example, China could  say "we'll modify this agricultural requirement for our good Canadian friends.....IF you back don't actively oppose our South China Sea claims." 
Even that as a fall-back would be good news for the Chinese.
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Offline Lightguns

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Re: Canada's New, Liberal, Foreign Policy
« Reply #274 on: August 31, 2016, 12:43:06 »
Even that as a fall-back would be good news for the Chinese.

How can one not actively oppose those claims when they have no basis in international law, your largest trading partner does oppose, and you have huge ethnic populations from concerned nations in your stronghold ridings?
Done, 34 years, 43 days complete, got's me damn pension!