Author Topic: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy  (Read 976427 times)

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Offline Uzlu

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3150 on: September 16, 2020, 11:18:57 »
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Newfoundland design company enters teaming agreement on Arctic icebreaker shipbuilding pitch

A Newfoundland and Labrador design company whose growth has been fueled by the federal government's National Shipbuilding Strategy hopes to soon get another opportunity to make an impression.

Seaspan Shipyards and Genoa Design announced a teaming agreement in a news release issued Wednesday. Seaspan, based in Vancouver, B.C., is building non-combat vessels for government as part of the national strategy. The company is close to completing its third offshore fisheries science vessel and is also working on an offshore oceanographic science vessel, joint support ships, medium endurance multi-tasked vessels and offshore patrol vessels.

The new teaming agreement with Genoa Design for 3D modeling and production design services concerns Seaspan's bid to regain the contract to replace Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Louis S. St-Laurent — the only ship in the Canadian fleet capable of year-round operations in the Arctic. That job was initially part of the deal when government named Seaspan an initial strategic partner in 2011 for the multibillion-dollar strategy alongside Irving Shipbuilding in Halifax. The latter company was tasked to build six Arctic and offshore patrol ships (AOPS) and 15 new warships for the navy in Nova Scotia.

Last year, Ottawa decided it would re-open bidding to replace the icebreaker. In December, Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) announced Chantier Davie Canada, a shipbuilder in Quebec, had been pre-qualified to become the third strategic partner for the strategy in order to build six program icebreakers. That company has also publically expressed its interest in the contract to replace CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent with the eventual CCGS John G. Diefenbaker.

Vote of confidence

Gina Pecore, CEO for Genoa Design, said the teaming agreement and vote of confidence from Seaspan means a lot to her company, which has grown from 20 employees to more than 220 since joining the shipbuilder's supply chain in 2014. Genoa has designed five vessels for Seaspan.

"This signifies the next step in an ongoing, very strong relationship with Seaspan," Pecore told The Telegram. "Seaspan has been extremely conscientious in working with Genoa to support our maturity in this program, and it opened the door to what's next. And what's next for us is that polar icebreaker."

Seaspan has invested $185 million in its shipyard. In the new release, the company stated it was "purpose-built" to deliver the polar icebreaker, adding its workforce, facilities and capacity make it the only shipyard in Canada capable of meeting the 2029 deadline to deliver CCGS John G. Diefenbaker.

"I would say we have a very high degree of confidence that we are the right partner for government," said Seaspan CEO Mark Lamarre. "And with respect to delivering (the icebreaker) on time and to the Canadian requirements, irrespective of what other companies' marketing claims might be, I would say I can explain what it takes to be successful in meeting this challenge.

“You need a modern shipyard that meets the Government of Canada's target state requirements and a level of investment. We need a continued investment in the shipyard to ensure that we are up to date with current technologies and that our work force is trained. We need a hot production line ... we're delivering our third ship and working on our fourth."

He pointed to a third-party study on capacity at the shipyard as proof it can handle everything already on its plate while also working to complete the polar icebreaker.

"We're the only shipyard in Canada that has the work force capabilities, capacity, pan-Canadian supply chain and we're the only shipyard that can build the icebreaker entirely in Canada by Canadians on the Canadian Coast Guard's urgent timeline," Lamarre said.

Newfoundland connections

Seaspan announced in June another team player for the polar icebreaker pitch with ties to Newfoundland and Labrador. Heddle Shipyards has a teaming agreement with Seaspan to fabricate ship modules at its three Ontario shipyards. The agreement would provide some work related to the strategy program to Heddle's site in Mount Pearl, where Genoa Design is also based.

Lamarre characterized his company's relationship with Genoa Design as a trusted partnership.

"I would say we share common interests in investment and technology and our approaches to management," he said, adding Genoa's project-specific capabilities make the company a good fit for working on the polar icebreaker. Genoa is also a sub-contractor for the United States' Polar Security Program.

Pecore said continuing to build on its relationship with Seaspan is not only important to the company's growth in Newfoundland and Labrador, but also to fellow sub-contractors in the province that have built their businesses up through work with the offshore oil and gas sector.

"There's a lot of capacity and a lot of expertise that fits here in terms of supply chain and ice expertise," Pecore said. "We've proven, over the past, almost a decade now, that we've been able to grow through some pretty difficult times by building close partnerships with our customers, and in particular with Seaspan, and then leverage that to more export potential. It's so important to us that we have long-term relationships with our customers in this way."

PSPC issued a request for information in February for the polar icebreaker build. Lamarre said everything is in place to start design work early next year if Seaspan is successful.
https://www.journalpioneer.com/business/regional-business/newfoundland-design-company-enters-teaming-agreement-on-arctic-icebreaker-shipbuilding-pitch-497504/

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3151 on: September 21, 2020, 12:35:18 »
https://www.journalpioneer.com/business/regional-business/newfoundland-design-company-enters-teaming-agreement-on-arctic-icebreaker-shipbuilding-pitch-497504/

Quote
Seaspan still trying to win back CCG polar icebreaker contract by spreading work around in politically useful places:

'We felt that we won': Vancouver shipyard fights second icebreaker battle

Mark Lamarre is making his latest pitch for why Ottawa should choose Seaspan ULC to build the Canadian Coast Guard’s next flagship, the CCGS John G. Diefenbaker.

The pitch involves an arrangement in which, if the Vancouver shipbuilder gets the contract to build the polar icebreaker, it will hire Newfoundland-based Genoa Design International to do part of the work.

The aim of Lamarre’s presentation is to highlight both Genoa’s potential and how giving the contract to Seaspan, which announced a similar deal with Ontario-based Heddle Marine in June, will benefit different parts of the country.

Yet there is something else to his spiel, an underlying frustration over the fact he is having to sell his yard as the best place to build the desperately needed polar icebreaker. The source of that frustration: Seaspan already won the work once before.

"I just want to underscore again that this is work that we felt that we won," Lamarre tells The Canadian Press before repeating the point less than a minute later. "This is work that we believe we've won."

The Diefenbaker was first announced by Stephen Harper’s Conservative government in 2008 and awarded to Seaspan in October 2011, one of seven ships to be built by the Vancouver shipyard through Ottawa’s multibillion-dollar shipbuilding strategy.

The plan at the time was for the entire deal, valued at $8 billion for all seven ships, to usher in a new era of stability and prosperity for shipbuilding on Canada’s West Coast while delivering much-needed vessels for the Coast Guard and Navy.

The Diefenbaker was arguably the crown jewel of the package. Originally budgeted at $721 million, the polar icebreaker was supposed to be delivered by 2017 and replace the Coast Guard’s flagship, the CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent.

But scheduling conflicts, technical problems and other issues scuttled the timeline and budget — which was increased to $1.3 billion in 2013 and is now under review again — before the government lifted the ship from Seaspan’s order book in August 2019.

Ottawa asked shipyards in March to explain how and why they should get the contract. Seaspan and Quebec rival Chantier Davie, which lost out of the competition that saw Seaspan get the Diefenbaker in 2011, were among the respondents.

Still, it’s clear Lamarre doesn’t think there should be any question about which yard should be tasked with building the vessel.

"As I said, we competed for the work in 2011 and won the right to the non-combat vessels," he said. "Since then, we've invested into the one of the most modern shipyards in North America."

The company says those investments have totalled $185 million over the past nine years and were specifically made for the purpose of building the icebreaker — and Lamarre says not winning the contract "changes our economic outlook."

"We are a profitable business now," he says. "And we have a program of work in front of us, but I just want to underscore again that this is work that we felt that we won.... And it's what we based our decision-making on for investing in this program."

Asked whether Seaspan would sue the government if it didn’t get the contract, Lamarre says: "It’s too early for that."

The government has not provided much of an explanation for why it took the Diefenbaker away from Seaspan, substituting in 16 smaller vessels that the Vancouver shipyard argues were already promised to it by the previous Conservative government.

Ottawa has said it wants to make sure the icebreaker is built "in the most efficient manner," noting the increasing age of the Coast Guard’s entire icebreaker fleet. It has not said when a decision might be made.

Davie is considered Seaspan’s chief competitor for the Diefenbaker. After losing out of the competition for work in 2011, the rival yard has since charged back and is now in line to build six medium icebreakers for the Coast Guard.

Yet even as Seaspan has faced continuing difficulty delivering on its schedule, Davie still hasn’t delivered two of three second-hand icebreakers it pushed the Liberal government to buy two years ago.

The Quebec company nonetheless insists it — not Seaspan — is best placed to build the Diefenbaker, particularly given it is already in line to build the other six icebreakers.

"As the national icebreaker centre, we will consolidate experience, expertise and skills at Canada’s largest and highest capacity shipyard to create world-class icebreakers in a competitive and sustainable manner," Davie spokesman Frederick Boisvert said in a statement.

"As has always been the case, Davie is the only shipbuilder capable of delivering the polar icebreaker."

Lamarre argues that with the investments made in its Vancouver shipyard and its new partnership with Genoa, Seaspan is ready to start work on the Diefenbaker now — and that Ottawa should stop wasting time and just move ahead with its original plan.

"I don't know why you would give it to anyone else other than Seaspan," he said.
https://www.timescolonist.com/we-felt-that-we-won-vancouver-shipyard-fights-second-icebreaker-battle-1.24206468

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Offline MilEME09

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3152 on: September 21, 2020, 12:47:53 »
All I hear is delays, they better put penalties in for delays to construction, etc..
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Offline Uzlu

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3153 on: October 06, 2020, 19:30:33 »
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Shipbuilding industry pushes back as federal government shops for used icebreaker

Shipbuilding association says the domestic industry needs the work

The federal government is in the market for another used icebreaker that could be converted for use by the Canadian Coast Guard on the Great Lakes — much to the dismay of shipbuilders across the country.

A request for proposals to acquire an existing light icebreaker was posted on the government's procurement website in mid-September.

The timing is interesting. Federal decision-makers have known for five years that the coast guard needs such a vessel for the region.

The request for proposals — which closes at the end of October — was posted as U.S. lawmakers began to push bipartisan legislation through Congress to strengthen the U.S. Coast Guard's capacity to break ice and keep commerce flowing on the Great Lakes.

The plan for Canada to buy a used icebreaker follows a separate decision by Transport Canada to purchase a used ferry from Spain on an emergency basis.

Build them here, says industry

The Canadian Marine Industry and Shipbuilding Association (CMISA), which represents most of the marine suppliers and shipyards across the country, said both decisions represent a loss of domestic jobs and at least $250 million in federal spending that could have gone into a Canadian economy hard hit by the coronavirus.

"We're of the strong belief that vessels such as light icebreakers can and should be built in Canada," said Colin Cooke, president and chief executive officer of the shipbuilding association.

"We have the capacity. We have the skilled trades. We have the expertise, the technical expertise. We have the shipyards. And that was what the point of the National Shipbuilding Strategy was all about."

That shipbuilding strategy is supposed to direct government work to Canadian shipyards. Cooke said the plan to purchase an existing icebreaker and the deal to acquire a former Spanish ferry would both be unacceptable in normal times — but they're even less acceptable now.

"We are in a COVID time when we're looking for all sorts of ways to make sure that people are employed, that businesses are able to survive — I won't say thrive, I will say survive — through the lockdowns caused by this pandemic," he said.

Public Services and Procurement Canada was asked for comment last Thursday but did not respond.

The tender for the light icebreaker, posted online Sept. 18, describes the purchase as a necessary interim step for the coast guard to "bridge the gap while awaiting the delivery of dedicated new vessels."

Significantly, the request for proposals noted that the need for such a ship was identified five years ago — around the same time a comprehensive analysis warned that the coast guard icebreaking fleet was in dire straits and in need of immediate replacement.

"In 2015-16 the CCG identified a requirement for interim icebreaking capabilities to fill gaps in capacity resulting from ships being temporarily withdrawn from service" for refit and life extension, said the tender.

Two years ago, the Liberal government concluded a deal worth $827 million with Chantier Davie of Levis, Que., which operates the Davie shipyard, to refit three medium-sized commercial icebreakers for the coast guard.

Used icebreakers could be scarce

Tim Choi, a University of Calgary shipbuilding expert, said this recent tender suggests the federal government is operating on the flawed assumption that there is an abundance of used icebreakers on the market.

The deal with the Davie shipyard was an anomaly and federal officials "got lucky" last time because there happened to be three vessels available, he said.

Choi said he believes the federal government isn't likely to be so fortunate this time: his research suggests there may be only one light icebreaker out there that would fit in the bill — in Finland — and it's not clear the Finns are ready to part with it.

"There are very few requirements for a vessel like that outside of Canada and the United States in the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence region," said Choi. "It's not like there's a used car lot where you can just go out and buy these things."

The shipbuilding association said it can make a strong case for a fast-track build in Canada. Choi said he believes procurement services may be forced in that direction anyway because of market conditions.

In mid-September, three U.S. senators — Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), Todd Young (R-IN) and Gary Peters (D-MI) — introduced the Great Lakes Winter Commerce Act.

The bipartisan legislation is expected to codify the U.S. Coast Guard's icebreaking operations on the Great Lakes and, more importantly, increase the size of its fleet.

"Inadequate icebreaking capacity in the Great Lakes is costing us thousands of American jobs and millions in business revenue," said Baldwin in a statement. "We must boost our icebreaking capacity in the Great Lakes to keep our maritime commerce moving."
https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/shipbuilding-icebreaker-coast-guard-great-lakes-1.5751143

Offline MilEME09

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3154 on: October 06, 2020, 20:29:28 »
Yes build here  even though our order books are full for 10 years, but the coast guard can wait right?

We are at max capacity pretty much, any additional vessels should go off shore. I am sure south Korea could build us a sizable ice breaker fleet at a good price before a single Canadian one.

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Offline suffolkowner

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3155 on: October 06, 2020, 20:37:38 »
It's probably not helping that Davie is behind schedule on the other two icebreaker conversions. Covid probably a bit of a factor and then there's this

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/lead-paint-icebreakers-coast-guard-davie-1.5748295

Offline Colin P

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3156 on: October 06, 2020, 20:47:38 »
Covid impacts the supply chain that supports the shipyard. Need a valve to finish a module? Do you wait for that valve that's been delayed or add the module and work around installing the valve later even if it's harder?

Offline dapaterson

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3157 on: October 06, 2020, 20:53:18 »
Threaten to lay off all your workforce, increase fixed price contracts, and deliver arguably substandard product seems to work for ISI.
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Offline Weinie

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3158 on: October 06, 2020, 20:57:05 »
Yes build here  even though our order books are full for 10 years, but the coast guard can wait right?

We are at max capacity pretty much, any additional vessels should go off shore. I am sure south Korea could build us a sizable ice breaker fleet at a good price before a single Canadian one.

Yeah, and at a better price and better capacity.........pfffftt that idea is doomed.
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Offline suffolkowner

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3159 on: October 06, 2020, 20:57:45 »
Covid impacts the supply chain that supports the shipyard. Need a valve to finish a module? Do you wait for that valve that's been delayed or add the module and work around installing the valve later even if it's harder?

For sure although I think the one ship was supposed to be done before Covid. My son is pricing a building out in steel right now partially because the price of wood is 2.5x more, apparently due to the mills shutting down because they thought there would be no demand(?) I'm not sure if that's an Ontario thing or what but it shows the extent of the impact

Offline Underway

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3160 on: October 08, 2020, 08:51:03 »
For sure although I think the one ship was supposed to be done before Covid. My son is pricing a building out in steel right now partially because the price of wood is 2.5x more, apparently due to the mills shutting down because they thought there would be no demand(?) I'm not sure if that's an Ontario thing or what but it shows the extent of the impact

I can't speak to the mills shutting down but wood went into super high demand as all those people who were going to spend money on holidays spent it on home reno's instead (guilty as charged).  The wood prices are crazy and the wood itself in the yards is still wet, hasn't been dried properly after pressure treating.  Garbage stuff.  So I set up a jury rigged drying shed (read tarp over stacked wood with enough room for airflow).

As for supply lines there are plenty of things that are on backorder.  You can't get a modem for wifi, certain chemicals are in short supply, and the list goes on.  And of course the manufacturing base had to adjust their processes to account for social distancing etc... which effects efficiency.

Offline Colin P

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3161 on: October 08, 2020, 12:22:09 »
Even before Covid, the pressure treated wood they were trying to sell was garbage, knots everywhere and already badly twisted in the yard. You could not use it to build a deck or a shed.

Offline Halifax Tar

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3162 on: October 08, 2020, 12:33:25 »
You guys must be buying from Irving eh ? lol bahahaha
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Offline CloudCover

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3163 on: October 08, 2020, 16:51:31 »
All 7 mills in North Okanagan are running at full capacity. That includes the 3 that were scheduled to close.  The problem is logs- they are shipping way too many raw logs to China and the US mills.
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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3164 on: October 10, 2020, 10:10:31 »
Meanwhile, on the west coast:

Last of three new coast guard vessels handed over in Victoria

Seaspan Shipyards officially handed over CCGS John Cabot — the last of three offshore fisheries science vessels the shipyard has built — to the Canadian Coast Guard in Victoria on Friday.

The vessel, designed specifically for the coast guard and scientists from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, joins CCGS Capt. Jacques Cartier and CCGS Sir John Franklin, which are already in service.

https://www.timescolonist.com/business/last-of-three-new-coast-guard-vessels-handed-over-in-victoria-1.24218579
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Offline Navy_Pete

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3165 on: October 11, 2020, 17:57:16 »
Yes build here  even though our order books are full for 10 years, but the coast guard can wait right?

We are at max capacity pretty much, any additional vessels should go off shore. I am sure south Korea could build us a sizable ice breaker fleet at a good price before a single Canadian one.

Canada has had a 'Build in Canada' shipbuilding policy in place since the 1960s with a process to go offshore if certain conditions are met. If we have a yard with the facilities to build something, we generally need to at least look at trying to build it here first. When 30-40% of all wages paid out to a Canadian yard go right back to the GoC, it's pretty hard to make the economic argument, as no foreign yard will want to touch the economic offsets for what is a relatively small project. An open bid with no IRBs or anything else would be the only true comparison, but that's a political hand grenade that no one will touch. Even without those clauses, you would be able to get some Canadian spinoffs and calculate that for bonus points, but those big S. Korean yards probably won't touch anything that isn't standard commercial terms as their order books are full and it costs money to put together a bid.

Given the amount of inter-departmental BS happening, and the general lack of political will for longterm projects, surprised the NSS is still rolling along, but probably has enough momentum it's not going to stop. For some projects (like the high speed ferry), makes total sense to go offhore as there isn't a Canadian yard capable of handling a ship that size, but for something like the Polar class icebreaker that was already part of the NSS bid, can't see that being done outside Canada.

Offline Colin P

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3166 on: October 11, 2020, 18:16:17 »
The biggest problem with the NSS, is it was started 20 years to late, so we have yet another panic situation where the hulls won't let the politicians delay any longer. We almost lost an icebreaker a couple of years ago to corrosion and wear.

Offline Navy_Pete

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3167 on: October 11, 2020, 19:38:34 »
The biggest problem with the NSS, is it was started 20 years to late, so we have yet another panic situation where the hulls won't let the politicians delay any longer. We almost lost an icebreaker a couple of years ago to corrosion and wear.

Fully agree, but it did take 10-15 years to get enough support to get approved.

'Urgent operational requirements' can lead to interim fixes, or additional funding for unforeseen major repairs, but generally aren't a good enough reason on their own for a waiver from the 'Build in Canada' policy. JSS is a good example, as that project has been in the works in some form or another since the late 80s, and we could have gotten them built abroad at any time in the last 20 years no problem with a waiver and some other policy coverage on the different contracting terms and other related project details. Things like outsourcing our QC would be a big one, but the whole procurement/selection process for all the bits and bobs inside the hull would be quite different on standard commercial terms.

Personally think building outside of Canada would come with it's own big set of challenges (aside from politics), but agree a new imperfect ship would probably still be better then no ship, or keeping an old one limping along safely. But I think if we do build outside the country, we'll probably try and enforce all kinds of insane IRB equivalencies and make them go with equipment bids (as opposed to just let the shipyard select equipment to meet the spec using known suppliers they have good relationships with) so we would never get the actual benefits of going with an established yard (with an established supply chain) but have the drawbacks of trying to remotely manage something being built on the other side of the planet by a company with no real allegiance. We may have issues with the exisiting NSS yards having some political leverage, but not sure a foreign yard where we are just a demanding customer would be a better relationship.

Online YZT580

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3168 on: October 11, 2020, 23:12:35 »
wasn't Irving saying that they needed more work to avoid layoffs in between the AOP and the frigate?  I know for a fact that Heddle could start cutting steel by early spring and produce modules at each of their yards with assembly in St. Catharines or, under license with assembly in Vancouver provided they had the design.  Wouldn't interfere with the schedule at all: just provide long term and skilled jobs in another province.  So buy an off  the shelf design from one of the Baltic companies limit your changes to electrical instead of trying to Canadianize everything and just get it done.   
« Last Edit: October 12, 2020, 11:24:40 by YZT580 »

Offline MilEME09

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3169 on: October 12, 2020, 02:06:50 »
wasn't Irving saying that they needed more work to avoid layoffs in between the AOR and the frigate?  I know for a fact that Heddle could start cutting steel by early spring and produce modules at each of their yards with assembly in St. Catharines or, under license with assembly in Vancouver provided they had the design.  Wouldn't interfere with the schedule at all: just provide long term and skilled jobs in another province.  So buy an off  the shelf design from one of the Baltic companies limit your changes to electrical instead of trying to Canadianize everything and just get it done.   

Maybe to avoid lay offs lets bump up the Type 26/CSC schedule?
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Online YZT580

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3170 on: October 12, 2020, 08:44:57 »
can do both.  Better long term results than just giving cash away as we are doing now.

Offline Uzlu

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3171 on: October 12, 2020, 10:27:33 »
wasn't Irving saying that they needed more work to avoid layoffs in between the AOR and the frigate?
Yes.  That is why Irving is going to build an additional two modified Harry DeWolfs after the first six Harry DeWolfs.  I think you wanted to write AOPS.

Online YZT580

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3172 on: October 12, 2020, 11:25:21 »
whoops engage brain before putting fingers in gear.

Offline Navy_Pete

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3173 on: October 12, 2020, 12:16:31 »
wasn't Irving saying that they needed more work to avoid layoffs in between the AOP and the frigate?  I know for a fact that Heddle could start cutting steel by early spring and produce modules at each of their yards with assembly in St. Catharines or, under license with assembly in Vancouver provided they had the design.  Wouldn't interfere with the schedule at all: just provide long term and skilled jobs in another province.  So buy an off  the shelf design from one of the Baltic companies limit your changes to electrical instead of trying to Canadianize everything and just get it done.   

Lead time in a lot of equipment is measured in years, and you still need to do up a production design specific to the yard equipment (specifically available tonnage of the cranes and working area). You also usually have to update the design to reflect changes to SOLAS and class society rules. If it was just as easy as licensing a design and building it then none of the three shipyards would be behind schedule.

Offline Harris

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Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3174 on: October 12, 2020, 18:28:14 »
wasn't Irving saying that they needed more work to avoid layoffs in between the AOP and the frigate?  I know for a fact that Heddle could start cutting steel by early spring and produce modules at each of their yards with assembly in St. Catharines or, under license with assembly in Vancouver provided they had the design.  Wouldn't interfere with the schedule at all: just provide long term and skilled jobs in another province.  So buy an off  the shelf design from one of the Baltic companies limit your changes to electrical instead of trying to Canadianize everything and just get it done.   

But nothing is ever off-the-shelf.  For example Canada has different health and safety requirements so there has to be some modifications to any item of this size and scope.  It's the amount that makes the difference.
Cheers

Todd
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