Author Topic: Eighteen year-old Canadian takes out Caroline Wozniacki and Venus Williams  (Read 2020 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Retired AF Guy

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 52,005
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,754
Eighteen year old Canadian Bianca Andreescu, rated 152 in the tennis during the ASB Classic in New Zealand, serves up two upsets in a row. First on Thursday, she defeated Caroline Wozniacki. This was followed by her defeat of Venus Williams.

Highlights of matches here:

Bianca_Andreescu vs Caroline_Wozniacki

Bianca_Andreescu vs  Venus Williams
« Last Edit: January 04, 2019, 20:39:18 by Retired AF Guy »
"Leave one wolf alive, and the sheep are never safe."

Arya Stark

Offline Hamish Seggie

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 229,117
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 10,356
  • This is my son Michael, KIA Afghanistan 3 Sep 08
Bahahaha 👍 no doubt that the media reps will put a spin on their losses.
Freedom Isn't Free   "Never Shall I Fail My Brothers"

“Do everything that is necessary and nothing that is not".

Online AbdullahD

    update status.

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • 27,605
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 513
That is impressive good for her.

Be interesting to see how he career goes.

Offline Retired AF Guy

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 52,005
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,754
Andreescu's winning streak continues with the 18-year-old easily defeating 28th-ranked Hsieh Su-Wei of Taiwan earlier today.  More here.
"Leave one wolf alive, and the sheep are never safe."

Arya Stark

Offline Retired AF Guy

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 52,005
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,754
On a roll!!

Quote
The Stunning Rise of Bianca Andreescu, Who Just Won at Indian Wells

By Gerald Marzorati

12:54 P.M.

Bianca Andreescu is into creative visualization. She learned the technique, which involves thinking about the things that you are hoping will happen, from her mother, who showed her a Web site that explained terms like “image generation” and “image maintenance,” “image inspection” and “image transformation.” Not that Andreescu wanted to get into all that. “It’s also a secret of mine,” she told me, when I asked her about it recently. She first started doing it, for hours and hours, at the age of thirteen. But there is so much else that she has to do these days, such as going online at night to complete the required assignments and take the necessary tests to finish up high school. Now she does creative visualization for fifteen minutes each morning. She also does it before practicing tennis or playing a match. She said that it provides a calming effect, and greater focus.

On Sunday morning, Andreescu visualized playing and winning the women’s championship at the BNP Paribas Open, in Indian Wells, California. She imagined the tactical, physical, and emotional challenges that she might face on court, and she pictured herself working through them. On Sunday afternoon, which was one of those cloudless and gentle Coachella Valley days that attract streams of retirees from the Midwest, Andreescu accomplished what she had envisioned, defeating Angelique Kerber, of Germany, a shrewd veteran, outstanding defender, and former No. 1, 6–4, 3–6, 6–4.

Andreescu, a Canadian, is just eighteen years old. Not since Serena Williams, twenty years ago, has someone that young won at Indian Wells—or at any of the other “premiere mandatory” events (Miami, Madrid, Beijing), which are considered the most prestigious and competitive tournaments after the Grand Slams and the Women’s Tennis Association’s year-end final. To win, Andreescu had to defeat not only Kerber, but also Garbiñe Muguruza, of Spain, a two-time Grand Slam winner and former No. 1, and Elina Svitolina, of Ukraine, who won the W.T.A. finals in October. At the beginning of the year, Andreescu was ranked No. 152. But by the time she reached Indian Wells she’d been on a tear. At a tournament in Auckland that serves as a tune-up for the Australian Open, she reached the final, beating the No. 1 seed, Caroline Wozniacki, and Venus Williams along the way. Then, after winning a challenger-level event in Newport Beach, she reached the semifinals of the hard-court tournament in Acapulco that leads into Indian Wells. Still, Andreescu needed a wild-card berth—which is awarded to a player at the discretion of the tournament’s organizers—to compete at Indian Wells. (The last tournament of importance I can recall in which a wild-card entry actually won was the 2009 U.S. Open, when Kim Clijsters, of Belgium, a former No. 1, was returning to tennis after a two-year retirement.) If Andreescu visualized her swift, steep ascent, few others did.

Andreescu is part of a surge of terrific Canadian tennis players who are the children of immigrants. Andreescu’s parents moved back to their native Romania for a time when she was young, and it was in Romania that Andreescu took her first tennis lesson. But it was at Tennis Canada’s facilities in Montreal and Toronto that she honed her game. “We don’t have too many players,” she said, when I asked her about the program. “Which is nice, because the coaches can work with them on specific things a lot of the time.”

Andreescu’s game has many specific things. She can drive her two-handed backhand, roll it with topspin at acute angles toward the sideline when presented with a short ball, or slice it with one hand on an unwavering glide path, as if on a frozen rope. She has a deft drop shot. Her topspin lob is well disguised and deadly. Her second serve is not a sixty-five-mile-per-hour rec-league spinner of the sort that is all too common in women’s tennis but a ninety-mile-per-hour dare, slid out wide or blasted flat up the T, which you seldom see from anyone without the last name of Williams. And she can hit her forehand flat, sliced, or in a loopy arc with heavy topspin. It’s like watching Clayton Kershaw pitch: Andreescu seldom puts two shots in a row to her opponent in the same hitting zone, at the same pace.

For me, this kind of play is tennis. Andreescu’s approach against Kerber was thinky, crafty, and, for considerable stretches, simply lovely. She set up a break point in the first game with a gossamer dropper, earned the break when Kerber double-faulted, and won the first set without being broken. She had two break-point chances in the third game of the second set, but couldn’t convert them. Kerber broke her the next game, a long one, and Andreescu’s energy level looked to be sagging—she’d played a lot of tennis, not only at Indian Wells but with all her deep runs at previous tournaments. (There is, in tennis, a physical punishment for winning: you keep playing and playing.) Kerber held her serve throughout the second set, winning rallies with perseverance and incisive shot placement. The championship would be decided in the third set.

Kerber broke Andreescu in the fifth game of the final set, but Andreescu broke right back, and then held her own serve with the help of two resounding forehand winners. She was limping a little by then, and she’d had medical treatment on her shoulder during a changeover. But she was willing one last push, and the crowd was beginning to roar for her. She broke Kerber again, only to be broken back after failing to win three championship points on her serve—a forehand in the net, a backhand shanked to the stands, another forehand in the net. Nerves? Exhaustion?

She’d earn one more championship point with Kerber serving, and, when Kerber netted a forehand, the crowd stood and cheered deliriously—fans know when they have witnessed history. Andreescu fell to her knees, dipped her head, and kissed the court. Then she rolled onto her back and lay down like a Canadian kid about to make a snow angel. Picture that.

    Gerald Marzorati writes regularly about tennis for newyorker.com. He is at work on a book about Serena Williams.

Link
"Leave one wolf alive, and the sheep are never safe."

Arya Stark

Offline Retired AF Guy

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 52,005
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,754
First Canadian woman to advance to the Rogers Cup finals in fifty years.

Quote
Canada’s Andreescu advances to Rogers Cup final after gruelling win over Kenin

By John Chidley-Hill, The Canadian Press — The Canadian Press — Aug 10 2019

TORONTO — Bianca Andreescu dropped to her knees and covered her face in visible relief before kissing the Aviva Centre's hardcourt after advancing to the Rogers Cup final.

Andreescu, from nearby Mississauga, Ont., held on for a 6-4, 7-6 (5) victory over Sofia Kenin of the United States on Saturday afternoon.

The 19-year-old won on her fifth match point to become the first Canadian to make the Rogers Cup women's final in 50 years.

Faye Urban of Windsor, Ont., beat Vancouver's Vicki Berner in the 1969 final, when the tournament was still played on clay courts and called the Canadian Open.

It's Andreescu's first tournament back from a right-shoulder injury that has sidelined her since the French Open in May.

Saturday's win was Andreescu's first at the Rogers Open that did not go three sets. She has been on the court more than any other player at this year's Rogers Cup at 10 hours 54 minutes.

All that playing after a lengthy layoff has taken a toll. Andreescu needed to have her legs wrapped and taped during the second set of a gritty quarterfinal win over Karolina Pliskova on Friday.

She was taped up again for the semifinal against Kenin, the last woman to beat Andreescu in a full match at the Mexico Open in Acapulco back in February.

Andreescu has now won 16 consecutive matches where she has not retired due to injury, including victories over six of the top 10 players in the WTA. Her world ranking will raise from 27th to at least 19th.

She'll play the winner of the second semifinal between American Serena Williams and Marie Bouzkova of the Czech Republic.

Andreescu brought her drop shot back against Kenin after rarely employing it against Pliskova. Her most deft use of the light touch came in the eighth game of the first set.

She telegraphed going for an overhand smash but then just tapped the ball to drop her shot neatly in bounds. Kenin banged her racket off the net in frustration as the Aviva Centre crowd roared its approval.

Another drop shot sealed the first set for Andreescu. Kenin was able to return the Canadian's first drop shot on set point but Andreescu was in perfect position to send another one right back, to the delight of the fans.

Kenin held her first lead of the match in the second set when a series of unforced errors by Andreescu gave the American a 2-1 advantage.

Andreescu responded, however, by winning four consecutive games. She took a 4-2 lead on the set when a sure-fire winner by Kenin clipped the net and landed out of bounds. Andreescu then rolled to a 5-2 lead before Kenin finally took a game point back.

Despite the vocal support of the sold-out crowd, Andreescu struggled to close out Kenin, putting several shots into the net to virtually hand two game points to the American and tie the set 5-5.

Andresscu finally saved on love to take a 6-5 lead when Kenin's return on her serve went wide.

After that point Kenin asked for a medical timeout and left the court to be attended to by a trainer. Andreescu sat calmly with a towel draped over her face with only her hair bun poking out during the three-minute break.

That set up a lengthy game that went to seven deuces and stretched to nearly 13 minutes of play, with neither player able to finish the other off.

Kenin finally got lucky in the seventh deuce when her forehand clipped the net and fell just in bounds for advantage. Andreescu's return on the next point went into the net to set up the tiebreak.

Andreescu doubled over in frustration when her perfectly lined-up forehand smash went long, returning the serve to Kenin and making the tiebreak 5-4. Although Andreescu argued with the umpire on the next point when a shot was out, she still returned the shot and got a point to make it 6-4 on the tiebreak.

Kenin got a point back, but Andreescu's backhand winner sealed the match and brought the Canadian to her knees.

After kissing the hard court Andreescu lay on her back, crying and covering her face. After speaking with an on-court reporter she found her parents in the crowd for a lengthy embrace.

___

Follow @jchidleyhill on Twitter

John Chidley-Hill, The Canadian Press

Link
"Leave one wolf alive, and the sheep are never safe."

Arya Stark

Online AbdullahD

    update status.

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • 27,605
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 513
First Canadian woman to advance to the Rogers Cup finals in fifty years.

Link

You go girl! Do us proud!

I hope she wins :)

Abdullah

Offline Retired AF Guy

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 52,005
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,754
You go girl! Do us proud!

I hope she wins :)

Abdullah

That she did. First Canadian to win woman's title in fifty years after Serena Williams retired in first set.

Quote
Canada’s Andreescu wins Rogers Cup after Williams retires due to injury

By John Chidley-Hill, The Canadian Press — Aug 11 2019

TORONTO — As soon as Bianca Andreescu heard that Serena Williams was retiring from their Rogers Cup final, she went to her opponent's bench, took a knee, and started consoling the veteran tennis player.

Lost in that moment of empathy was the fact that Andreescu had just become the first Canadian to win the tournament in 50 years.

"I started tearing up because she was tearing up. It's because I know how she feels," said Andreescu on Sunday. "Injuries really, really suck."

Andreescu, from Mississauga, Ont., was up 3-1 in the first set at Aviva Centre when Williams called for a medical timeout. Less than a minute later, the chair umpire announced that Williams was retiring from the match, handing Andreescu her second WTA Premier title of the season.

"It's not the way I wanted to win, but a win is a win so I'm really happy," said Andreescu, who is the first Canadian to win the title since Faye Urban of Windsor, Ont., beat Vancouver's Vicki Berner in 1969. The tournament was still played on clay courts and called the Canadian Open when Urban won.

Williams was impressed with the 19-year-old Andreescu's class in that shared moment on the bench, calling her a "great sportswoman" and an "old soul."

"She's wiser than her, what is she? Nineteen years old?" said the 37-year-old Williams, who added that the brief encounter with Andreescu was the highlight of the tournament for her. "She definitely doesn't seem like a 19-year old in her words, on court and her game, her attitude, her actions."

Andreescu also won at Indian Wells in March, the beginning of a 17-match win streak, not counting when she has had to retire from matches due to injury herself. She holds victories over seven of the top 10 players in the world this season, including Williams.

"I would say that the win in Indian Wells was — I mean, it was a hard-fought battle," said Andreescu, referring to her three-set win over No. 8 Angelique Kerber. "So I felt like it was a sweeter victory at the time.

"But (the Rogers Cup) is at home. I've dedicated so much hard work and sweat on that tennis court and in this gym, so this tournament is definitely ten times more special."

Andreescu and golfer Brooke Henderson are early front runners for the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada's athlete of the year and the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award, The Canadian Press's female athlete of the year honour.

Henderson has won two LPGA events this season and has set the all-time record for wins by a Canadian professional golfer. Andreescu has her two titles this season and her world ranking will rise from 27th to 14th on Monday. Her previous high was 22nd.

Andreescu's Rogers Cup win was so fresh that she hadn't even considered that she might earn all-around honours like the Marsh or Rosenfeld.

"That hasn't crossed my mind. But if I win that, then it would be awesome. I'm not complaining right now," said Andreescu. "I haven't really thought about anything other than this win. So anything outside of this is a bonus."

The Rogers Cup was Andreescu's first tournament after a right-shoulder injury sidelined her since the French Open in May.

Andreescu had been on the court more than any other player at this year's Rogers Cup at 10 hours 54 minutes heading into Sunday's final. All that playing took a toll on Andreescu, who needed a medical timeout in her quarterfinal win over world No. 3 Karolina Pliskova to have her groin taped. Both legs were wrapped and taped for her next two matches.

Sunday's final lasted only 16 minutes before Williams's medical timeout brought it to a premature end.

"It's not easy for Serena, for sure, to pull out, especially to pull out in a final," said Andreescu. "I know how she feels because I've done that many times in my short career. But sometimes you just have to listen to your body."

Williams said the injury is a recurring back spasm that doesn't affect her ability to walk but makes serves and overhand shots painful. She expected to go to Cincinnati for the next stop on the WTA Tour to test it out ahead of the U.S. Open.

"The most frustrating part is that I've had these awful spasms a lot in my career," said Williams. "And they're incredibly painful, but it goes away after, like, 24, 36, maybe 48 hours, and like clockwork.

"So I do different treatments. I take a day off. But obviously, I didn't have 24 hours or plus to take off (ahead of the Rogers Cup final)."

Williams's retirement was the last in a string of high-profile injuries at this year's Rogers Cup. Fourth-seeded Simona Halep withdrew from her quarterfinal matchup with Marie Bouzkova.

On the men's side in Montreal, Milos Raonic of Thornhill, Ont., retired after two sets against Montreal's Felix Auger-Aliassime in a much-anticipated all-Canadian matchup. Sixteenth-seeded Gael Monfils then withdrew before his semifinal against world No. 2 Rafael Nadal.

Later Sunday, Katerina Siniakova and Barbora Krejcikova beat Demi Schuurs and Anna-Lena Gronefeld 7-6, 6-0 for the women's doubles title.

___

Follow @jchidleyhill on Twitter

John Chidley-Hill, The Canadian Press

Link

"Leave one wolf alive, and the sheep are never safe."

Arya Stark

Offline RomeoJuliet

  • Donor
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • 11,845
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 516
Bravo!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Online Remius

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 118,080
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3,531
I don’t follow tennis.  But very nice.
Optio

Online AbdullahD

    update status.

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • 27,605
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 513
That she did. First Canadian to win woman's title in fifty years after Serena Williams retired in first set.

Link

I was just reading this! I am beyond impressed!

A very impressive start to hopefully a long and fulfilling career :)

Abdullah

Offline Retired AF Guy

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 52,005
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,754
Bianca Andreescu, first Canadian to win a Grand Slam singles title! Beating Serena Williams 6-3, 7-5.

"Leave one wolf alive, and the sheep are never safe."

Arya Stark

Offline RomeoJuliet

  • Donor
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • 11,845
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 516
Sweet victory!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline Retired AF Guy

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 52,005
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,754
More here:

Quote
  Bianca Andreescu stuns Serena Williams to win US Open final

• Canadian 19-year-old holds nerve to triumph 6-3, 7-5
• Williams loses her fourth grand-slam final in a row

Kevin Mitchell at Flushing Meadows

Sat 7 Sep 2019 23.00 BST
Last modified on Sat 7 Sep 2019 23.18 BST

Serena Williams, so strong of limb and spirit, could not disguise her inner frailty when she stumbled at the tape in the US Open final, and tennis embraced another new teenage champion, Bianca Andreescu, who took an hour and 40 minutes to win 6-3, 7-5 on her grand slam final debut.

It was a match of uneven quality but festooned in unalloyed drama and much history. It also crowned the best first appearance in the tournament decider since Venus Williams lost to Martina Hingis in the 1997 final.

Serena has reached four of six slam finals (most recently losing to Andreescu’s friend, Simona Halep, at Wimbledon) since giving birth two years ago, but has yet to win one and remains stuck one short of the all-time record 24 majors owned by Margaret Court’.

“I remember always telling my team I wanted to play her right before she retires,” the 19-year-old Andreescu said of Williams, who won her first slam nine months before the Canadian was born. “She’s an amazing champion on and off the court. I remember watching her when I was about 10.”

She got to watch her close up for the second time on Saturday, having seen her across the net only for the 19 minutes it took for an upper back injury to cut the American down in Toronto last month, trailing 1-3, the one time they have played each other. Born in Ontario, Andreescu returned to her parents’ birthplace, Romania, between seven and 11, and models her game on that of Halep.

Williams began the match with a 97mph ace wide to the backhand, one of her slowest, but two double faults at the end of it as she strove for rhythm cost her the game. It was a dream start for the debutant finalist.

A fiery hold in the third showed how much winning this title for a seventh time meant to Williams, though. She clearly dreaded the prospect of losing to two teenagers in a row in her home final.

There was anger in every forehand and one smashed winner threatened to rattle the corporate windows. The crowd were with her, apparently having forgiven her for her meltdown when losing to Naomi Osaka in the decider a year ago.

Andreescu did not lack for support from north of the border and looked composed and patient, waiting for her chance to length her lead. She more than likely knew that Williams was 21-0 in slam finals when taking the first set. The Canadian needed to get on the board first.

The match was turning into an unapologetic hitting contest, with little between them in full-blooded exchanges – and much grunting. Williams saved five break points in the long seventh game and held with a ferocious forehand down the line.
The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian's sport coverage
Read more

The American got her first break point after 36 minutes, but Andreescu found an ace and held for 5-3.

She then grabbed set point with a killer forehand after 42 minutes – and Williams double-faulted. The door edged open.

When nerves gripped Williams’s racket in the second game of the second set, she double faulted on break point again. It was starting to look ugly. Andreescu’s demeanour did not change, much as Osaka had stayed calm at the centre of the storm on the 2018 final.

Williams grabbed four break points in the third game – blowing the third with a poor challenge – and clipped the net to get back on serve. It was a break in both senses of the word.

Williams was just finding some form and control when another double fault put her in peril again, and Andreescu broke her again to go a set and 3-1 up after a little over an hour of a match that was expected to go long. If she could hold her nerve, the title was hers.

A weird episode brought a hush over the packed Arthur Ashe Stadium when Williams stopped in the last shot of the fifth game, seeming to lose balance and cohesion, and shoving the backhand wide to go 1-4 down.

Struggling physically now as well as mentally, she looked lost in the one place she had nearly always seemed most comfortable, a tennis court. The errors grew, the self-belief drained from her. She double-faulted for the sixth time, but Andreescu could not convert the first of two break points. She didn’t need to. Williams wearily put a forehand wide, and Andreescu served for the title.

Would there be a last charge from the former champion? The strength had left her racket. Shots dropped short or sailed long. She kept punching, though, hunting down a drop shot, getting back for the lob and forcing an overcooked forehand from her opponent.

On her knees, metaphorically, she saved match point, catching Andreescu off guard with a decent return. A few shots from her memory bank, against all prior indications, kept her in it – and Andreescu, who had the match on her racket after an hour and a quarter, threw her a lifeline with a lazy forehand.

Energised, Williams held for 3-5. The pressure switched like an unruly hurricane to the other end. Hitting the ball became a chore not a joy for Andreescu. Williams broke for 4-5.

On the changeover, the crowd went crazy for Williams, and she looked around the stadium, in either puzzlement or appreciation. Andreescu put her head under a towel.

Andreescu did not touch the ball in the first four points of Williams’s service game: ace, double-fault, ace, double-fault. When she did, she hit too wide, and Williams had won four games in a row for parity.

Only then did Andreescu belatedly come to life, holding nervously to 30. After an hour-and-a-half, Williams served to stay in the match for the third time. Andreescu got two match points 23 minutes after her previous one – and Williams saved one with a wide ace similar to the one with which she started the contest. But there was nothing she could do about the forehand winner that ended the agony.

As Martina Navratilova said of Andreescu’s temporary disappearance: “You don’t win matches against Serena playing not to lose, you play to win.” In the end, that’s exactly what she did.

In 11 seasons, the 28-year-old Johanna Konta has beaten top five players just seven times; since Andreescu joined the Tour in 2015, Andreescu has beaten seven top-10 players, and the results have come in a rush, interrupted by injury, over the past year.

Last year she couldn’t get out of qualifying in all four slams and finished the year ranked 178 in the world. When she leaves here, winning in her fourth appearance in a main draw, she will celebrate a remarkable season by breaking into the top 10.

Article

It was touch and go in the second set with Andreescu leading 5-1, but Williams came storming back and the crowd roaring whenever she won a game, however, Andreescu kept her composure to win the match.

« Last Edit: September 07, 2019, 18:38:12 by Retired AF Guy »
"Leave one wolf alive, and the sheep are never safe."

Arya Stark